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Sawdust Creator
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I agree....for close to the same price you can get a well reviewed craftsman.
 

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I have that model router and it works great. The inlet work all you would need is a straight cut bit. The router comes with a template guide so all you would need to make is a pattern. If a 1/2" straight cut bit would do your inlet work the router also comes with a bit. To make rabbet joints all you would need is a rabbet router bit. They come in different sizes depending on your needs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks. I'm trying to decide because I'm on a budget and I can get the hf one cheaper with their coupons. Are hf router bits any good?
 

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Thanks. I'm trying to decide because I'm on a budget and I can get the hf one cheaper with their coupons. Are hf router bits any good?
IMO there are too many other reasonable choices to take the chance on HF bits. Router bits spin in excess of 20K rpms, and can shed pieces of carbide at high speed. The MCLS 15 pc set for $42 shipped is pretty decent, and is an excellent value. The Grizzly purple bits are reasonably priced and are on sale for 20% off if you buy 3 items.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I can get the hf router for 54 bucks but it has a 1/4 shank. What's the downfall to 1/4? I was thinking it might be good until I get enough money to buy a nicer one. But I'll definitely buy the mlcs router bits that you recommend.
 

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I can get the hf router for 54 bucks but it has a 1/4 shank. What's the downfall to 1/4? I was thinking it might be good until I get enough money to buy a nicer one. But I'll definitely buy the mlcs router bits that you recommend.
If you get the HF router it comes with a 1/4" and 3/8" collet adapters so you can use any size router bit including 1/2". To answer your question though 1/4" shank router bits are easy to bend making them useless.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks. I'm pretty sure I'll go with the hf router for now and eventually upgrade. I'll let you guys know how it goes. Thanks for all your help.
 

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A router for a table is better bought with certain features in mind as opposed to one brand over the other. Having a larger router (13 amps +/-, usually referred to a 2 1/4 HP; or larger) and variable speed is extremely useful. then consider how to raise/lower it in the table. Many fxed base routers wil work for this, in a fashion, so be sure you get something you're willing to live with. Plunge routers can sometimes be a little easier. All that would assume you're not planning on a lift. Regardless, I'm sure you'll be satisfied with the Craftsman router you purchase...it will probably be just one of many after a few years :laughing:.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Fred Hargis said:
A router for a table is better bought with certain features in mind as opposed to one brand over the other. Having a larger router (13 amps +/-, usually referred to a 2 1/4 HP; or larger) and variable speed is extremely useful. then consider how to raise/lower it in the table. Many fxed base routers wil work for this, in a fashion, so be sure you get something you're willing to live with. Plunge routers can sometimes be a little easier. All that would assume you're not planning on a lift. Regardless, I'm sure you'll be satisfied with the Craftsman router you purchase...it will probably be just one of many after a few years :laughing:.
It has a variable speed and I'm planning on just buying an insert plate for my top. I think I'll be happy with it and I'll definitely will be routin more
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Im still trying to decide on what type of material to use for the top and how thick it should be. Do you have any suggestions?
 
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