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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend of my father's had a neat business. It was basically a membership woodworking place. You could buy a membership and come use his equipment for projects, have your own bin for wood etc. Neat idea. Unless the electrician screws up the wiring and it causes a fire. That's what happened. He put all his equipment in storage and has been in a lawsuit for 2 years. I talked to him recently and told him I was moving my business into finished, dressed high grade lumber. He offered to bring some of his pieces to my shop, set it up, use it for a few months and then settle on a price. I went to see his stuff and was in heaven -- Powermatic industrial 15 inch planer with spiral cutterhead, 3hp dust collectors, big edgers, band saws with all the shims to do veneer cuts-to much more to list.

Spring is going to be a vvveerrryyy happy time for my humble little shop :yes: :yes: :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It must be a sign. I've been mulling over the idea of selling the logging side of the business. The mill seems to have had real steady work since 2002 and enough people have been asking me about drying and final dressing of lumber that I think it would be a good venture. Selling the logging equipment would fund finishing the kiln, resaw building and the equipment to go inside. It's a scary move, I've been in the woods for about 20 years and it's something that I know and am comfortable with but this seems like the way to go. The closest kiln from my location is almost an hour away. Plus I know all the loggers in the county so whatever I need for log stock, I could zip around with my trailer and buy it right off the landing.

The guy with the woodworking equipment has literally got everything that I could possibly need in one shot instead of piece meal for the next who knows how many years. He also had a guy working for him that is an excellent mechanic and kept all the equipment in top shape, plus that guy said he would be happy to come to my shop if I ever needed him. It's still intimidating leaving the woods but the wife and some friends have convinced me that things seem to happen for a reason. I hate to wake up one day at 80 years old and regret not trying something like this.
 

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It does sound like an opportunity although the details are sketchy in my little brain.
Is there a way you can make a transition period without totally abandoning the control of having a sawmill?
I realize everyone's situation is different but if I were to close my sawmill, which I really don't even use very often, it would kill my business before I even have the opportunity to go at it full bore.
It's true that the further up the processing chain you get the more money you make "with less work" (boy is that relative) but with my little experience it seems you ought not let the whole thing go until you are sure this is what will work for you. Not just what you want.
I look back over the last 2 years and see how I would have redone things and I would have been leaps and bounds ahead of where I am now.
Just my uninvited 2 coppers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No, no, I'm not getting rid of the sawmill. Just the logging side of the business which is basically selling my skidder and just doing the milling, kiln and the resaw shop (planer work, making hardwood flooring etc). The sawmill has enough business from just doing custom sawing and a couple good customers that are consistent buyers.
 
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