Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been adding what my wife and I feel are the last few bits that I need to get my beginner hobbyist shop setup.

A trip down to Woodcraft in Allentown and I ended up leaving with a 151 spokeshave and Wood River? low angle block plane. I got home and put some left over 2x4 stock I had in a vice and gave them both a try. Wow! :eek: There was something that felt fundamentally right on a primal level shaping the wood. First, I used the block plane and actually made the 2x4 square. Then I rounded it to a respectable circle with the spokeshave. Given the price, I could see hand tools easily being a much larger expense than machines?

I found that it was a bit easier to push the spokeshave rather than pull it as I started to get more round. Am I imagining things?

Anyway, noob post just sharing some excitement!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
Welcome!

I'm glad you are having such a good experience for your first time using a plane/spokeshave. It is a rush the first time everything starts to work right for you.

Hand tools can easily become an obsession, but not necessarily too expensive. Many of us who use a lot of hand tools work with vintage tools that have been purchased and refurbished to their original functionality.

Of course you can also choose to buy new and have a well working tool right out of the box. It's a matter of money vs. time for a lot of people.

In case you haven't noticed it yet, we have lots of these type discussions in the Hand Tools forum.

Glad to have another "hand tooler" join the ranks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,399 Posts
Finding it harder to push then too pull is good. Everybody does the same job their way. The only rule to follow is to do what feels best for you. Then again, did you try flipping the wood? The grain direction is just as important as tool direction. Find what feels best for you and enjoy!
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
The Allentown Woodcraft is also my local store. I am north west of the store. You are in NJ.

The 1/2in radius spokeshave can be pushed or pulled. As Bernie mentioned, the grain direction will have the biggest impact. You want to the stroke to be in the direction of the grain. If the stroke is against the grain it will take more energy and has the risk of tearout.

A block plane is useful. If you are getting to like hand tools, you will soon find you need additional planes, chisels, etc.

Hand tools can be less expensive or more expensive than power tools. Like many hobbies, there is a large spectrum. I have seen infill planes with asking prices in the thousands of dollars.

The Wood River planes are not bad, but many folks like the vintage Stanley planes.

I am almost finished with a restoration of a No. 5, seen in this thread. The No. 4 in this thread has already found a new home.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/restore-not-restore-no-5-a-48981/index2/

I have another No. 4 in transit and presently starting to work on a No. 6. I also have two other No. 5's which are in the restoration queue.

If you have not seen the Hand Tools forum on the site, it is worth taking a look. Perhaps existing threads for some of your questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
909 Posts
Try a card scraper (and burnisher) next... very cheap, and lots of fun if you like the planes and spokeshaves! For just a square of spring steel they're stunningly useful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Glad to hear that you are enjoying yourself with your new found tools. A block plane and a spokeshave, once properly honed and set up can be unbelievably satisfying to use.

At one time I had a fully equipped shop with thousands of dollars worth of electric powered machines but had to sell it all when I relocated. Now I have a small modest shop with only a band saw, router table, circular saw, drill, belt sander, drill press and a collection of hand tools. With that equipment I find that I can build just about anything I care to build and find that using the hand tools like what you bought brings me more joy and sense of accomplishment than using the power assisted machines.

Oh, one other thing I need to mention, you are blessed having a wife who understands your woodworking passion... mine never did and was problematic at best at times.

Good luck and happy woodworking to you.
 

·
Master firewood maker
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
mine doesn't either. then again, i don't understand her obsession with court tv. so i guess we are even.

welcome to the rabbit hole.

garage and estate sales are a great way to find good vintage hand tools for much less than good new ones. for a smoothing plane, it is really hard to beat a vintage stanley #4 that has been tuned up.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top