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Well after my cold outside thread. I really think hand tools are about the only way to go inside. Although I was not to find of the idea at first after reading into it I'm kinda getting excited about it. So first off I need to acquire some tools. I have a block plane a no.4 and a no. 5 as well as a no.78 although it is missing the depth stop and fence. I also have a 1/4 3/8 and 1 in chisel. And an old backsaw that I tried to sharpen and now won't cut hot butter. So what would a basic hand tool beginner kit consist of. And maybe a good project idea to get me into the dark arts lol.

Stupid phone the title is supposed to read hand tool newb.
 

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You also have at least one mallet. :icon_smile:

Do you have a brace? You need some way for drilling.

More hand planes such as router plane, shoulder plane.

Some cabinet scrapers, flat and curved. This will help a lot to reduce hand sanding and minimize dust.

http://www.woodcraft.com/search2/search.aspx?query=cabinet scraper

You need some type of bench in this bedroom-come-workshop.

I used B&D Workmates for decades before I made some benches.

One of the challenges of temporary workshop can be clamping without your normal bench and vises. Think about how you want to hold boards.

Initial projects to help later work
a) Shooting board to get edges or ends square
b) Bench hook. Firemedic has a thread with a good design/video by Roy Underhill
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/roy-undethill-bench-hook-43453/
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Oh yes I have a mallet I made and a very nice one from Robert as well. I forgot I do also have a bahco card scraper only a flat one though and a workbemch is no problem the vise like you said however is I really don't want to take the one on my large bench outside off hat would be quite the hassle.

Thaynks for the tip I was thinking a router plane probaly. And the hand brace.... To bad its not flea market season.
 

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Any tips at all???
*****Disclaimer: I'm a newb too, and much of my hand tool knowledge is coming from Christopher Schwarz's book, _The Anarchist's Tool Chest_. I would recommend (The digital version is very affordable). I do have decades of woodcraft know-how though, but not to the level of some of these guys.*****

You can use your No. 5 as a try/joiner by picking up another iron from Lee Valley and grinding a very, very slight camber, or radius, to it. Since the No. 5 is short it would take a lot of skill for joining edges and truing faces.

For wasting a lot of material, you'll want your jack's original iron to have a large camber to it.

All that said, you'd probably be happiest in the long run with a dedicated joiner such as a No. 7 or No. 8. You can pick up a 7 for a lot less $.

Then a block or apron plane.

Add a grinder (I like hand grinders) and some sharpening/honing system to the top of your list. I like oil and arkansas stones for the latter, but water systems are very popular. Just don't forget to lubricate after sharpening!

That's about as far as I dare venture giving anybody else advice. ;-)

Good luck!
 

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lay out, measuring, marking knife,
panel saws, rip and cross cut,
back saws rip and cross cut.
turning saw / coping saw / fret saw
burnisher for your scraper.
turn screws or screw drivers.
clamps, all types and sizes.
rasps,
files to sharpen your saws.

a twin screw vise commonly known as a moxon vise is always nice to have.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So any advice on saws in particular I know I need a decent one for clean crosscuts dados and rabbets. One that won't break the bank though.
 

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So any advice on saws in particular I know I need a decent one for clean crosscuts dados and rabbets. One that won't break the bank though.
First you need to decide what style you want. Western or Eastern. Western saws typically cut on the push stroke, while eastern saws typically cut on the pull stroke. Then you need to decide if you want to buy new or old. New saws. for a decent mid grade saw look into Thomas Flynn or Veritas. these are decent mid grade saws. top of the line would be the lie nielsens and countless other small saw dealers who craft custom saws such as bad axe or Northwind toolworks.

If your looking for older saws look into antique dealers who mainly sell tools. look for brands like Disston, Disston made saws from the late 1800's untill im not sure when, When buying older saws, Generally the older the saw the better the steel is in the blade. the handle or tote is usually made from a fruit wood or beech. and will have a classic elegant shape to it. When you buy an older saw usually you are buying someone else's troubles. I find alot of these saws that are warped, bent, cracked / broken totes, dull, missing parts.

If I was in your shoes. I would buy new. less headaches to deal with. I would buy a rip back saw in a veritas or lie nielsen average price of $75 to $150 ish. then I would buy a cheaper grade of a Thomas flynn or crown rip panel saw. I would buy an el cheapo coping saw (mainly for dovetails).

What I am going to say next may cause an argument, it is not my intention to. But, you can use a rip saw to make cross cuts. as long as it is a sharp saw its honestly not that bad with tear out as long as your using a knife to mark your lines with and you saw straight. It is a lot easier then trying to use a cross cut to do rip cuts, this works too. But it will gum up if your wood has any water or a high sap like pine. Doing this will get you started. and not break the bank. And you can add to your collection. as you go. If you decide to buy old and need work on your saw done. you can find a few saw doctors that can fix your saw untill you learn to do it on your own. Such as
http://www.thesawwright.com/

http://www.logancabinetshoppe.com/

these are just a couple. I know these 2 are good at what they do. pricey but good.


just my opinions.
 
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Not much to add to what John wrote about saws, but I would offer one option. Depending on the size of projects/wood you are going to work with, a gents saw is an option (cheaper too). I used one for a couple of years on small projects (<3/8" thickness) before I bought a dovetail saw. It will cut material thicker, but with ~16-18 tpi, it is slow going.

I've got to give a +1 to using a rip saw for crosscuts. I've got a good classic Disston CC backsaw, but it's dull and I just haven't found time to sharpen it so I've been using my Veritas DT saw for CC.

Another thing that just occurred to me. Make yourself a chute (shoot) board and use the #4 and/or block plane with it. You'll be amazed what you can do with one. Clean up end grain, cut miters and bevels, adjust widths of small boards, square ends. In fact, just today I was using it with a shoulder plane to cut tenons on small pieces. And it's not just for use with a plane. I use mine to support the wood when making CC (it also helps keep the saw perpendicular).
 

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Hello wood_chucker, Interesting thread.
I’ve also been thinking a lot about using hand tools and cutting back on power use. I do love my power tools, but my electric bill is killing me with all the penalties for overuse. When I look at my retirement income in another year or so, I just don’t think I’ll be able to afford it. The other thing that’s hard for me anyway is noise pollution. I do not sleep very well and sometimes I want to work in the shop at night only I would probably be arrested or shot if I tried turning on a saw or something in the middle of the night. LOL

I inherited a lot of tools from my dad who was a carpenter all his life and I’ve just recently pulled them out to clean them, but the one thing I’m realizing now that I’ve been getting into planes is that I need a wood vice system. I have a good workbench top, but no bench dogs for long boards. I’ve been clamping one end while working on the other side them swapping sides, but I’ve noticed that I can see were the two sides meet in the middle.

My dad left me with 12 handsaws of different teeth count for ripping and crosscut as well as different lengthens for getting into tight places I guess. Now I'm not an expert on hand saws and I only know from what I have and what I've bought from Sears. I have looked on eBay, but all I see there it hand painted works of art.
 
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