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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thoughts on Ash for a 20" panel saw handle? The Ash material I have available for this project aligns with the customers history with the saw. Not convinced Ash works well for a saw handle since I am not seeing anyone else use this material. It looks great but will it stand up to a drop? Every saw has to survive one drop from the workbench to the floor. I want this to be no different.
Experience?
Input?
Thanks!
 

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where's my table saw?
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A straight grained wood will split along the grain no matter the species. A complex grain will not, like a burl.
I never knew Apple wood was a favorite for handsaw handles:
 

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Aren't baseball bats made of Ash? I'd think a few homeruns with a bat would (at least) equal a fall from a workbench. Grain direction would be very important, I'd think.
 

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mike44
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A friend of mine worked for Henry Disston a Philadelphia company that made many handsaws. I remember a broken pick handle that he made out of apple wood. I asked him why he used apple wood. He said he had a piece laying around and almost any straight grained wood would do. He was a saw setter most of the time but also worked in other areas including handle making. If I recall correctly the handles were made from Beech and Apple depending on what years they were made.. He said like the pick handle almost any straight grain hardwood would do for handles. He also made totes for hand planes as side job that continued when he retired. H.K.Porter bought out Disston in the 1950's .
The totes were made from several different species, cherry, walnut , apple etc. The wood used depended on what he had on hand .
mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A straight grained wood will split along the grain no matter the species. A complex grain will not, like a burl.
I never knew Apple wood was a favorite for handsaw handles:
So figured ash is what you would use- okay. Yes on Apple! Inherited old Disstons with Applewood handles and they feel amazing!
Again, to clarify your point - you would use Ash if the grain supported the geometries. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Aren't baseball bats made of Ash? I'd think a few homeruns with a bat would (at least) equal a fall from a workbench. Grain direction would be very important, I'd think.
Indeed they are and I agree about the grain direction. Sure seems to be a good material.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A friend of mine worked for Henry Disston a Philadelphia company that made many handsaws. I remember a broken pick handle that he made out of apple wood. I asked him why he used apple wood. He said he had a piece laying around and almost any straight grained wood would do. He was a saw setter most of the time but also worked in other areas including handle making. If I recall correctly the handles were made from Beech and Apple depending on what years they were made.. He said like the pick handle almost any straight grain hardwood would do for handles. He also made totes for hand planes as side job that continued when he retired. H.K.Porter bought out Disston in the 1950's .
The totes were made from several different species, cherry, walnut , apple etc. The wood used depended on what he had on hand .
mike
Thank you Kwoodhands- this is very good input and helps increase confidence in the material I am considering. Thank you very much!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I use ash for tool handles regularly. I bust them from hard use long before they could split. (i.e. mauls, axes, shovels, hammers, etc.)
Thanks! Confidence increased, material selected. Your input is appreciated, thanks again!
 

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where's my table saw?
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I use ash for tool handles regularly. I bust them from hard use long before they could split. (i.e. mauls, axes, shovels, hammers, etc.)
The grain direction on an axe handle is down the length, so it different than a saw handle which would be parallel with the force applied... JMO.

Thanks! Confidence increased, material selected. Your input is appreciated, thanks again!
I'm back to referring about grain direction. A plane's tote or a saw handle has a different force direction applied than an axe handle. I have had nice Walnut totes split right along the grain direction from a drop or just old age. That's my concern here, no matter the wood choice.
 
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