Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When I try to hand plane the ends of some boards that I've cut in order to even them up from my somewhat not-so-good cross-cutting, I get chip-out. is there a way to prevent this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
Are you using a shooting board or at least a backing board tightly clamped to the one you are planing?

+ 1 on the pictures and what plane are you using?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
No shooting board, and the plane is a small one - smaller than a no.5 jack plane. image-1189015240.jpg The one with the red handle. The boards I was evening out were too big for a shooting board, which i don't have, btw. Most likely i need to get better at cross - cutting LOL Oh, the chip - out is at the end of the plane run, when the plane goes off the end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Where is the area on the timber in question , is it the end of the long grain on the top of the board , or the endgrain of the board ?

Show us without the planes . For the plane photo , show the base , let us see what you see when you set the blade
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,801 Posts
Without a backing board you're going to get tearing/chipping at the back edge. You can minimize/prevent this by taking some short strokes from that side and then doing the other direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
First make a shooting board. Its almost a necessity when planning end grain, at least it is for me.

Second, always use a backer board and clamp your work piece tightly to it. Its the same principle as using a backer board to prevent chip out when drilling holes.

Keep your plane blades razor sharp and only take tiny cuts. Your cutting end grain and that just loves to chip even when everything else is perfect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
Another thing that will help with planing end grain is getting a low angle plane - one that is bedded at 12 degrees instead of 20 degrees like the one in your picture appears to be. It won't help with tear-out on the end of the board but will make the process a lot easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
I've used a #5 just like that one to plane end grain without a shooting board, though I prefer my #3 or #4 if I'm going to freehand. It can be made to work, but it's not as easy. I don't actually OWN a low angle plane, except maybe for one low-quality block plane, so I don't use one.

1) Sharpen the plane. No, sharpen it better. Really. You need it as sharp as you can get it; I have trouble getting mine sharp enough.

2) Close up the mouth. The frog can be adjusted, and you want it as far forward as possible without the iron actually contacting the front of the mouth.

3) Set for a very fine cut, as fine as you reasonably can. Planing end grain is hard work, don't make it harder on yourself.

4) Mark a line perfectly square to your reference edge on both sides of the board. Without a shooting board, you absolutely need the reference.

5) Start planing. You want to go from each end towards the middle, and I like to reach the marked line at the ends first, leaving a hump in the middle. It's easier to plane down the hump without tearout that way, because your strokes aren't reaching the edge of the board.

If you're getting dust out of the plane instead of shavings, you probably need to sharpen more. I'm told that moistening the endgrain with denatured alcohol helps, but I've never tried it, so I can't really say for sure.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top