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The two larger planes appear to have the irons vertical. Scraper planes are like that. I have a Jack plane that is old, and other planes some I have made. 35/40 ° I think is the angle of the bed on my Stanley #5.
I've got to back fareastern on this one. Those blades are 45 degrees to the bed and those are normal hand planes
 

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where's my table saw?
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One of the best sites I've come across regarding Stanley Planes:

The column on the right has every sub-category of types and specifics you'll ever need;
 

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mike44
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Might I suggest that you put at least one of your jack planes in a bucket,stand back,and look at it?As for scraper planes,are we considering something like the Stanley 80 or a toothing plane?
Not a toothing plane but a Stanley #112 or similar. I do not claim to be a hand plane expert as you seem to be.
I have seen scraper planes which could be like those pictured. I use a simple card scraper , not a plane when needed.
Not familiar with Stanley # 80. The scraper plane that I have seen sat on a shelf and I personally never saw it used.
My boss used card scrapers and taught me the same.
mike
I've got to back fareastern on this one. Those blades are 45 degrees to the bed and those are normal hand planes
I'm done arguing about this post. No matter how I look at the photo the irons appear vertical to me.
Hopefully this will be the last post about the planes in the bucket.
 

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Egg Spurt
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I'm kind of a snob towards tools that are outrageously priced..planes running upward to $700 each.. Sure..nice planes, but not $700 worth of nice for what I do..My $35 Stanley's do what I need them to do..
 

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Thanks for the input. I'm not opposed to having some for carpentry use, but I'm going to skip it. If it was close, I'd go take a look, but it's a drive and I see nothing else of interest at the estate sale.

I have about 7 planes now. As I said, I don't know much about planes and what the differences are. Mine go from short to one about 18 or 24 inches long. Some were passed down to me, others I got at estate sales for a few bucks each. All are in much better shape than the ones above. Any suggestions on a good book or site to learn about the different styles and what to use them for? At some point I will want to go through them get them into top shape.
Here are a couple of websites that I found informative and interesting. You may too. Best of luck, Frank

 

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This is a stanley 112
Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Rebate plane Jack plane


The larger planes in the bucket are definitely no 5 type planes...which is the most common rusty plane in America.
 

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Is that your plane? How do you sharpen the blade? 90* like a card scraper, or with a bevel? 45* or more like a regular plane blade?
It is a stock photo and I do not own one.

I was taught to use the blade at 90deg like a card scraper so you can use both sides. Having used one only a few times, I'm no expert, but I did have to adjust the burr a few times to get it at the right angle to cut.
 

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It is a stock photo and I do not own one.

I was taught to use the blade at 90deg like a card scraper so you can use both sides. Having used one only a few times, I'm no expert, but I did have to adjust the burr a few times to get it at the right angle to cut.
That’s not correct, BC. A cabinet scraper blade is set up very differently from a card scraper. See post above. Never used one either but I would assume a scraper plane is the same.
 

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Property mgmt
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That’s not correct, BC. A cabinet scraper blade is set up very differently from a card scraper. See post above. Never used one either but I would assume a scraper plane is the same.
Ok, the picture i posted of the Stanley 12 is my tool. I have sharpened the blade and tried to use it a little, so i guess amongst those posting here … i’m the expert. Now that’s a scary thought. Anyway, i had thought about sharpening the blade square like a card scraper, but didn’t, instead i did an angle. Part of my logic was … given that I am used to sharpening chisels and plane blades at an angle, trying to consistently sharpen at 90* would be awkward. Just clamp the blade in the wheeled holder and take a few swipes like a regular blade. It works.

Sidebar. The scraper blade is very wide. I could get it clamped in the holder, but it’s wider than my diamond plate and wider than my stones, so i have to push it sideways across the stone. Lots of short strokes.
 

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Ok, the picture i posted of the Stanley 12 is my tool. I have sharpened the blade and tried to use it a little, so i guess amongst those posting here … i’m the expert. Now that’s a scary thought. Anyway, i had thought about sharpening the blade square like a card scraper, but didn’t, instead i did an angle. Part of my logic was … given that I am used to sharpening chisels and plane blades at an angle, trying to consistently sharpen at 90* would be awkward. Just clamp the blade in the wheeled holder and take a few swipes like a regular blade. It works.

Sidebar. The scraper blade is very wide. I could get it clamped in the holder, but it’s wider than my diamond plate and wider than my stones, so i have to push it sideways across the stone. Lots of short strokes.
Did you turn a burr? A properly set up scraper should have a hook and product shavings.

Handwriting Plant Twig Font Line
 

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where's my table saw?
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I think these are both cabinet scrapers, a Stanley 112 and a L.S.Starrett:
Metal Fashion accessory Auto part Titanium Nickel
Household hardware Kitchen utensil Gas Spoon Metal
 

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That’s not correct, BC. A cabinet scraper blade is set up very differently from a card scraper. See post above. Never used one either but I would assume a scraper plane is the same.
I've only used one once 20 years ago. My memory may be off, and I'm definitely not an expert. I do remember it being hard to dial in the burr at the correct angle. I thought the blade I used had square edges, but I could be wrong.
 

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I disagree with most that entirely. Who doesn’t want to use quality tools? It’s not snobbery, it’s knowing a good tool will do better and make the work better, too. A person who maybe doesn’t have the funds/priorities/permission to obtain them may have a tinge of jealousy?

The fastest path to frustration and discouragement is a newbie trying to develop skills using cheap tools. Period!
I have a lot of Bedrock and Bailey planes, even a few Lie Nielsen. Yes, it is a joy to work with them. But, I picked up a Stanley handyman (#4) series plane for a couple of bucks; cleaned it real well, trued up the sides and the bottom, then stuck a Ron Hock iron and breaker in it. Works as nice as the others now. I guess what I am suggesting is that if you take a little time to fix up (tune) any plane and stick the right iron in it, you could end up with a really nice tool. For the beginner woodworker this is a good way to start to acquire some tools without the expense and start to develop skills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I have a lot of Bedrock and Bailey planes, even a few Lie Nielsen. Yes, it is a joy to work with them. But, I picked up a Stanley handyman (#4) series plane for a couple of bucks; cleaned it real well, trued up the sides and the bottom, then stuck a Ron Hock iron and breaker in it. Works as nice as the others now. I guess what I am suggesting is that if you take a little time to fix up (tune) any plane and stick the right iron in it, you could end up with a really nice tool. For the beginner woodworker this is a good way to start to acquire some tools without the expense and start to develop skills.
@Swedish Carpenter, couldn't agree more. And it applies to more than just planes.
 
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