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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These are at an estate sale. No idea how much they want, sale hasn't started yet. There are no pictures of other tools at the sale, so I think it's a bit odd to see these.

I'm not a plane user, so I have no idea if any of these are any good or special. I want to learn more about the different types, get a decent assortment, and start using them.

Can anyone tell from the picture if any of these are worth going to look at?

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input. I'm not opposed to having some for carpentry use, but I'm going to skip it. If it was close, I'd go take a look, but it's a drive and I see nothing else of interest at the estate sale.

I have about 7 planes now. As I said, I don't know much about planes and what the differences are. Mine go from short to one about 18 or 24 inches long. Some were passed down to me, others I got at estate sales for a few bucks each. All are in much better shape than the ones above. Any suggestions on a good book or site to learn about the different styles and what to use them for? At some point I will want to go through them get them into top shape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
"The Stanley Plane" by Alvin Sellens is a good place to start. The block planes in the bucket have the blade set at a higher angle (20 degrees I think), while a variety of planes for precision work on hard end grain have a lower angle (12 degrees I think).
I've developed a process with books, probably because of the expense of them for my son in high school and college.

We have a great library. It is a part of a system of about 100 libraries. I can look for an item on their website and order it. If my library doesn't carry it (or if they do but someone else has checked it out), it gets transferred to my library within a few days. Sometimes I just make notes from the book from the library and that's it. If I think it is something I will look back at enough, I generally look for a used copy to purchase.

If I can't get a copy from my library (as is the case with the book @JohnGi mentioned, my library system didn't have it), I'll see if it is available to read online. In the case of this book, I was able to read it at no charge at Internet Archive: Digital Library of Free & Borrowable Books, Movies, Music & Wayback Machine. After looking at it, I decided to purchase a copy, depending on the price.

If you think prices are crazy on used woodworking tools, you haven't looked for books! The book @JohnGi mentioned is listed by various sellers from $55 - $179.50 for a used hardcover version. One seller was asking $502.88 for new copy!

Surprisingly, there are also copies of this book available that are what I consider a bootleg version. These are copies that come from outside the U.S. They are scanned from a genuine copy and then printed, so they are only as good as the copy that was scanned. They might have blurry, missing or areas with black spots. I doubt I would ever buy one of these no matter what book it was. I assume they violate copywrite rules, which is why they are "printed" and come from outside the U.S.

A few minutes of searching on 5 or so book sites and I found a used hardcover copy described as in "fair" condition for only $10.63 with tax and shipping. I ordered it. The next best price was $55. I would say the condition of the books I have purchased has been better than what the sellers have described. I have only had one problem, and the seller refunded my money with no questions asked.
 
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