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The old block planes were 100% carpenter tools. Very few furniture makers used them. I don't like the old block planes.

The bench plane on the left had a weird casting and a plastic handle. That is a $5 plane IMO.

Thre right one does not have a lateral adjustment lever. This could mean it is broken, or it could be a cheap design.

Any one of these will take a good amount of work and skill to make usable.
 

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Not really true, BC. A good block plane is part of every furniture maker's arsenal. :)
I am taking things as hear-say, but my source was Garret Hack.
Block planes are common and useful now, but prior to Lie Nielsen times, the block plane was mainly popular with carpenters. The vintage Stanley's are not great for furniture.
 
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I find a lot of the comments here to border on snobbery. Cheap casting. Wrong bed angle. Carpenter not woodworker. Plastic handle. Nobody remembers the cliche “it's a poor craftsman who blames his tools”? Clean it, sharpen it, tune as best you can … and put it to work. Use your skill to overcome the economy of the tool.
Oh hell yes, I'm a tool snob.
There are so many great tools around today that nobody should have to suffer with a bad one.
With vintage planes, the price difference often isn't large between a bad tool and a great user either, so it pays to be patient.
 

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I like that. Nothing wrong with that attitude.

But it’s like people who are heavily invested in Festool, or Snap-On … danged expensive tools, and there are lesser tools that will perform just as well.

None of us have touched the tools in the bucket, and we have one picture to go buy. Could be … more than one of those planes could be good enough to clean & tune, and use for a loaner, or pass on to a young person as a starter gift.
I've got a modestly large hand plane collection with all grades of tool represented. There are very few that are unusable. The history is important to me as well as the functionality. When I pick up a tool to use though, I'm going to reach for the one that is the best for the job though. Sometimes that is actually a cheap, lightweight plane and sometimes it is a lie Nielsen.

But I'm a total snob with my purchases. I only buy things that fit into a specific niche, and I dont need any tools that are second best to something I already own.
 

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The two larger planes appear to have the irons vertical. Scraper planes are like that. I have a Jack plane that is old, and other planes some I have made. 35/40 ° I think is the angle of the bed on my Stanley #5.
I've got to back fareastern on this one. Those blades are 45 degrees to the bed and those are normal hand planes
 

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This is a stanley 112
Smoothing plane Plane Scrub plane Rebate plane Jack plane


The larger planes in the bucket are definitely no 5 type planes...which is the most common rusty plane in America.
 

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Is that your plane? How do you sharpen the blade? 90* like a card scraper, or with a bevel? 45* or more like a regular plane blade?
It is a stock photo and I do not own one.

I was taught to use the blade at 90deg like a card scraper so you can use both sides. Having used one only a few times, I'm no expert, but I did have to adjust the burr a few times to get it at the right angle to cut.
 

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That’s not correct, BC. A cabinet scraper blade is set up very differently from a card scraper. See post above. Never used one either but I would assume a scraper plane is the same.
I've only used one once 20 years ago. My memory may be off, and I'm definitely not an expert. I do remember it being hard to dial in the burr at the correct angle. I thought the blade I used had square edges, but I could be wrong.
 
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