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Hey everyone, I currently do not own a single plane. Where do I start? Which type should I start with and what brand should I get? I am a hobbyist so not planning to spend a ton of money but will spend enough to get a quality plane that will last for a long time. Thoughts? Advice??
 

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There are different planes for different purposes. What do you think you will do with a plane if you had one? If we knew that we could make a recommendation.

I haven't bought a new plane in thirty years but I often look at old tools at antique malls and flea markets. A lot of us on this forum like to fix up old planes and some make them from scratch.

I think the most recommended all around plane has been the Stanley "5". I have one, which I bought new about 35 ys ago. For me it's a less frequently used plane.

Bret
 

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" ... not planning to spend a ton of money" /QUOTE]

We all say that.

Before you spend any money, read everything you can get your hands on. Go to the local library and see if they have Fine Woodworking or Popular Wood Working. While there are numerous woodworking magazines out there, these two seem always to have a hand plane bent to them.

Also, the Handplane Book by Garrett Hack (The Handplane Book: Garrett Hack, John S Sheldon: 9781561587124: Amazon.com: Books) Is a great resource.

Two good manufacturers/retailers are:

Lee Valley Tools: http://www.leevalley.com/us/
Lie-Nielsen Toolworks: http://www.lie-nielsen.com/

There is also:

Woodcraft (Woodriver handplanes): http://www.woodcraft.com/category/2021170/woodriver-v3-bench-hand-planes.aspx

Woodcraft (Stanley): http://www.woodcraft.com/search2/search.aspx?query=stanley

What ever you do, do not by Groz planes. You will regret it.

I would give up my wife, my kids, my pickup and my dog, before I would give this up: http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=61963&cat=1,41182,48942 This is just a wonderful block plane that does everything I ask of it, is an excellently machined tool, looks nice and is quite comfortable. Regardless of the direction in woodworking you head (handtool only, mix of handtools and machines or machines only) you need a block plane.

Good luck and report back what you come up with.

Greg
 

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Head over to the Hand Tools section and peruse some of the recent threads. There have been several in the last couple of months addressing your exact questions. Once you've done some of that reading, you'll be better prepared to ask some more specific questions and get some answers that will fit your situation better.
 

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Head over to the Hand Tools section and peruse some of the recent threads. There have been several in the last couple of months addressing your exact questions. Once you've done some of that reading, you'll be better prepared to ask some more specific questions and get some answers that will fit your situation better.
You beat me to this reply. Other good earlier replies.

Yours is a common question, so many earlier threads. Worth reading.

You will find useful information, and perhaps more focused questions.

This is a recent thread.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/first-hand-plane-help-46304/

Another recent thread.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/first-hand-plane-44959/

You have to give some thought to how you will use a hand plane.

Will you be using it to flatten long boards?

Will you be using it to get a straight edge on a long board?

Will you be using it to remove glue?

Will you be using it with small pieces of wood?

Will you be using it to clean the bottom of dado's?

Will you be using it to clean tenon's?

A long time ago I walked into a woodwork related store and told the sales person I wanted to buy a hand plane. The person was honest and said he knew nothing about hand planes. I was still in a mood to purchase one, so I left with a Record No 5, which I still have.

Over the years my hand plane collection has grown as I found out some planes are designed for certain tasks, some are specialized for certain tasks.

A common answer is a block plane and a No 5 bench plane.

I have a No 4 and No 5, and like the lighter weight of the No 4.

My favourite plan is the Lee Valley Medium Shoulder Plane, but this is only relevant for certain tasks.

If you read the linked threads you will see other threads about restoring hand planes.

I am presently restoring a Stanley No 5 and just restored a Sargent 408 (equivalent of Stanley No 3). I purchased these for $5 each. A decent amount of time involved, but I find it very satisfying.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/latest-rust-bucket-planes-46494/

Whatever hand plane(s) you get, you should also read up on sharpening blades. Even a brand new plane will soon need sharpening once you start to use it.
 
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