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I need to make about 25 half laps in 1-1/2" x 3" inch Douglas Fir using a router table and was wondering what the best approach would be without getting overly complex with fancy jigs and such. I am relatively new on a router table.

I don't want to sound like I am over-thinking it but just want some feedback/help. My plan was to:

1) Set router fence to 3 inches as a stop for the shoulder

2) Use a simple MDF push block riding on the fence to push material
through

3) Start cutting on the end of the work piece with a 3/4" bit (biggest I have) and move work piece towards the fence.

4) For the last cut, make sure work piece is against fence and push block to establish a straight shoulder and repetitive along 25 separate pieces.

This may be the way everybody does it or may not be a good way at all. I'm just looking for simple ideas. Also, I think I prefer to not use a miter gauge strictly due to the fact of having to have the fence absolutely parallel.
 

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I need to make about 25 half laps in 1-1/2" x 3" inch Douglas Fir using a router table and was wondering what the best approach would be without getting overly complex with fancy jigs and such. I am relatively new on a router table.

I don't want to sound like I am over-thinking it but just want some feedback/help. My plan was to:

1) Set router fence to 3 inches as a stop for the shoulder

2) Use a simple MDF push block riding on the fence to push material
through

3) Start cutting on the end of the work piece with a 3/4" bit (biggest I have) and move work piece towards the fence.

4) For the last cut, make sure work piece is against fence and push block to establish a straight shoulder and repetitive along 25 separate pieces.

This may be the way everybody does it or may not be a good way at all. I'm just looking for simple ideas. Also, I think I prefer to not use a miter gauge strictly due to the fact of having to have the fence absolutely parallel.
That sounds like it would work. You might do them in more than one pass though. Probably three passes.




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That's the way I do it too. However, if I'm using oak I pre-score the shoulders on my TS. Oak likes to bend away from the cutter leaving a frizzy edged shoulder. 80% of the time it sands away....that leaves too much to do over, IMHO!

Typically, I'll nibble at full height about 1/4" - 5/16" each pass since height is critical for half laps. But I do them quickly.

Also, since I took a pic for someone else today, you may find something like this helpful. The block is 7 X 7. Closet rod handle is held by a 3" screw, counter-bored on the bottom. All 4 edges have 1" wide rabbets, from 3/4" to 3/8" deep. Workpiece slips under the ledge and provides more control. Leading edges get a little nipped sometime, but doesn't affect the function. Enough said, here's a pic.



 

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I need to make about 25 half laps in 1-1/2" x 3" inch Douglas Fir using a router table and was wondering what the best approach would be without getting overly complex with fancy jigs and such. I am relatively new on a router table.

I don't want to sound like I am over-thinking it but just want some feedback/help. My plan was to:

1) Set router fence to 3 inches as a stop for the shoulder

2) Use a simple MDF push block riding on the fence to push material
through

3) Start cutting on the end of the work piece with a 3/4" bit (biggest I have) and move work piece towards the fence.

4) For the last cut, make sure work piece is against fence and push block to establish a straight shoulder and repetitive along 25 separate pieces.

This may be the way everybody does it or may not be a good way at all. I'm just looking for simple ideas. Also, I think I prefer to not use a miter gauge strictly due to the fact of having to have the fence absolutely parallel.
you may add a backer block to minimize tear out on the bit exit.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the tips guys. I got them cut using this method (bought a 1" straight bit). I'll put up pictures of the workbench when its completed.
 
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