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Welcome from a whole different world - New Hampshire. You just joined the best woodworking forum of both worlds :yes:

A bit of advise to all new woodworkers - be safe. Know and understand your tools and the wood you work.

If you are new to the hobby - start by building a few simple projects for your workshop like a simple bench - work stations and storage shelves and bins. We all made mistakes when we started (we still do but we experienced folks know how to hide our mistakes).

Don't throw out your short cut offs - use them to practice joinery.

Above all else - have fun! Don't be afraid to ask questions and post a picture or two for difficult to explain questions. Lots of nice folks here on this site
 

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Welcome Aboard
 

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Half a bubble off.. {Θ¿Θ}
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Hey Jennifer. Welcome aboard. Dig around, read, watch vids, check out links & learn.
There's some great content here and great people to explain processes.
Above all else.. don't be afraid to ask questions!!
Big wave from Maine.
..Jon..
 

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Welcome Jennifer,

You couldn't have come to a better place.

I've been woodworking for 5(6?) years and I learn something every time I visit the forum.

Please don't be embarrassed to ask any question and keep us posted (with pics) on your progress.

Remember, a picture is worth a thousand words so when asking questions please include
photos/illustrations when possible.

And yes, safety first and foremost!

Jeff
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
BernieL said:
Welcome from a whole different world - New Hampshire. You just joined the best woodworking forum of both worlds :yes:

A bit of advise to all new woodworkers - be safe. Know and understand your tools and the wood you work.

If you are new to the hobby - start by building a few simple projects for your workshop like a simple bench - work stations and storage shelves and bins. We all made mistakes when we started (we still do but we experienced folks know how to hide our mistakes).

Don't throw out your short cut offs - use them to practice joinery.

Above all else - have fun! Don't be afraid to ask questions and post a picture or two for difficult to explain questions. Lots of nice folks here on this site
Great advice! I can already see that a big challenge will be having enough space in the workshop!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I do have a question regarding biscuits: do they provide significant structural integrity? Or are they mainly for esthetic appeal, or when screws can't be used? I ask because I will be building a bookshelf for my niece, which will have to support a good amount of weight. I just discovered the biscuit joiner and have been practicing with it on scrap wood. I really like the way it joins wood together, but would hate for the shelf to collapse under the weight of her books. Thanks!
 

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I do have a question regarding biscuits: do they provide significant structural integrity? Or are they mainly for esthetic appeal, or when screws can't be used? I ask because I will be building a bookshelf for my niece, which will have to support a good amount of weight. I just discovered the biscuit joiner and have been practicing with it on scrap wood. I really like the way it joins wood together, but would hate for the shelf to collapse under the weight of her books. Thanks!
Welcome to the forum. Good to see someone from afar.

Biscuits are normally used for alignment. If they are a tight fit, and if you use a gap filling adhesive like epoxy, they may add to the joint, but may not if you use e.g., yellow glue which can dry and leave voids.

Normally if you are gluing face or edge grain together, a tight fitting joint will be stronger than the glue, and does not need other reinforcements. For long board glue ups, I prefer to use dowels for alignment vertically and horizontally. Takes a little longer than biscuits, but I get better results. For short board glue ups, I just use clamps to control the alignment.
 

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For a book case, I would use dado cuts in the sides of the book case for 1 shelf in the middle and the bottom shelf (about 3 or 4 inches up off the floor). The top would at the minimum span over the sides. Add a back to the case and you have a strong stable structure.

If you are building a simple shelf with wood brackets, do what Dave has instructed for additional strength, but biscuits could work since the pressure will only be a downward push.

May I suggest you re-post your question in the woodworking and you will get a much better response. Add pictures if you can so we can all better understand your questions. In this case, are you building a simple shelf or a bookcase?
 
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