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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I seem to be building more glue-up panels than I expected before I turned from framing to furnature and cabinets. I need a sander
to speed the process from belt sander and random orbit.Grizzly seems to have a less expensive 18" open end sander. Does anyone have any coments on this tool?

Dave S
 

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I have the grizzly 18" open end sander and think it is a great tool. It has a pretty good dust port, is easy to use/adjust, and swapping paper is easy.
 

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Grizzly 18" sander

I have the Grizzly G0458 open sander. I have used it on short 2" x 4" pieces, and up to 6" x 6" x 12ft timber. I did a test seat platform glue up and it leveled up my poorly glued up 2" x 6"s nicely. It does produce a nice surface with the supplied sand paper. I haven't changed the drum sand paper yet.

However, tracking the drive conveyor belt, takes a bit of time for me. I just watch it and adjust accordingly.

Sanding 4 pieces of 9" long 2" x 4"s, I would try to keep at least one piece under the sanding roll to eliminate snipe. But one caught the outfeed side of the housing and tore the drive paper. I haven't had the chance to talk to Grizzly about this, maybe this was operator error.

Other then those two items, I like the unit and will be using it more on the chairs I need to make.

I picked mine up at the PA warehouse. The fork lift operator was able to load it in the side door of my van with an inch on both sides. (I also attached the stand to the sander unit while it was still in the van. Way much easier tipping it upright from the van height than from the floor like the manual says.)

Good luck with your purchase.

Jon
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Griz Open end sander

Thanks for your advise. I notice that the speed of the drum is 4000fom which is about twice that of others. Any problems with this speed?

Your problem with the feed table rip is interesting. Is the feeds surface like a sanding belt that can be replaced at low cost?

Thanks again

Dave S
 

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feeds, speeds and belt replacement

Dave,

The speed of the feed belt is adjustable from 2 to 12 ft per minute. The drum surface speed is 4000 fpm. I usually run the feed belt around 6 fpm. I do not notice any problems with the drum speed, but I have no experience to judge against either.

The tear is off to one side of the feed belt. I have not had the chance to call Grizzly tech support and ask about a replacement belt. It does not show up as a typical part on line. I think it is a replacement part from the parts break down sheet. I don't think the manuals show much as how to replace it either. But like I said, I haven't had the time to look into it.

I would not let your decision about buying this machine be effected by my ripped feed belt. I am not sure it wasn't operator error. I do need to get more use out of this machine because I also have some glue up panels for a bench and chairs to start making.

Good luck,

Jon
Northern Michigan
 

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Jon,

I was looking into this because I've done a few projects with reclaimed wood. I pull nails best I can and then pass over it with a metal detector. Then I run it in the planer after I clean it with a wire brush and wash it as best I can. This is along, tedious process, I'm trying to keep from destroying my planer blades. My question is have you ever run reclaimed lumber through your g0458? I was thinking if I have a piece of wood with a disengrated nail in it or just after I have preped a board best I can I could run it through that and skip the planer. Just looking to remove some of the tedious prep work associated with reclaimed wood while adding a valuable tool to my shop with the sander, hence my interest in it as I don't have any drum sander currently.
Thanks
 

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laxin213: I don't see why you could not use the sander for that clean up. I don't remember what the cost of the drum sand paper is for a roll, but I think you get three pieces per 22 ft roll. Probably much cheaper than the planer knives. Maybe try rough sand then run thru planer? But do you have to purchase a drum sander to try this?

Also on my tearing of the feed belt, I talked to Grizzly tech and told him I was sanding short 2" x 4" s. He thought the short 9" length of the board did not have enough weight to hold the short board down when exiting the drum. I have not had that problem when sanding longer boards. I still have not done any glue ups for chair "seats" yet either.
 

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I have a performax 16-32 and a performax 22-44 pro. If I had a spiral head planer I would use them less. I only have a 12 inch straight knife planer. I use the sanders to flatten every glue up because they have zero risk of tearout.
 

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Jon,

I was looking into this because I've done a few projects with reclaimed wood. I pull nails best I can and then pass over it with a metal detector. Then I run it in the planer after I clean it with a wire brush and wash it as best I can. This is along, tedious process, I'm trying to keep from destroying my planer blades. My question is have you ever run reclaimed lumber through your g0458? I was thinking if I have a piece of wood with a disengrated nail in it or just after I have preped a board best I can I could run it through that and skip the planer. Just looking to remove some of the tedious prep work associated with reclaimed wood while adding a valuable tool to my shop with the sander, hence my interest in it as I don't have any drum sander currently.
Thanks
I just ran some reclaimed pine through my drum sander. I never hit a nail, but it shouldn't hurt anything. The drum sanders work great (way better than a planer) for reclaimed lumber.
 
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