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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Grandfather passed away a couple of months ago. He was an avid woodworker since his first job at a wooden toy company back in the 50's-60's.

He spent his last few years semi-retired and he & a partner ran a small thermo-form shop. Pretty amazing - he'd build a mold out of wood, shaping it exactly to specs and then melt the plastic over the mold using a shop-made oven.

I was invited to his shop to take my pick from some of the tools. There is a lot of industrial machinery that, although I'd love to have, I don't have the room or 3 phase to run it. I opted to pick out some hand tools and some other misc tools.

You can see the tools in the pictures - some clamps, some small saws, a heat gun, an old Grizzly/woodcraft dovetail jig, some books, a craftsman rotary head with a foredom (grinder?) end, what looks like a taper jig (maybe missing a piece?) some other misc stuff and this scraper thing. It has 2 cherries & germany engraved on it, so I'm assuming it was made by the same folks that make the chisels, etc. I don't really know what it's for. Does anybody recognize the scraper thing?

I estimated it to be worth about $125. I have no idea. Some of it doesn't really have any value (like the outdated books), but the other stuff may be worth more than I think. Any body care to venture a reasonable value for this stuff?

I have another box of stuff I'll be picking up later this week. I'll post some pics and I'm sure I'll have some questions.

Thanks for looking!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The last picture looks like a draw knife (AKA draw shave). Primary use is debarking logs. Can also be used for shaping wood.
Gotcha. Thanks cabinetman. I hope to one day find good use for it.
Any thoughts on the overall value of this lot?
 

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Agreed = that's a draw knife. Big ones are expensive.
Another use is to prune down oversize log ends for tenon cutters to make rustic furniture.

For some variety and prices, look at Magard Log Home Building Tools.
 

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Only you can determine the value of the stuff. What amount would you need to part with everything? A similar, but different question is how much would this stuff sell for on the open market. I would say a couple bucks per item, or that's what I would pay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Only you can determine the value of the stuff. What amount would you need to part with everything? A similar, but different question is how much would this stuff sell for on the open market. I would say a couple bucks per item, or that's what I would pay.
Thanks and I appreciate your response. That's kind of what I tried to do. It doesn't really matter, we're just trying to keep track (value-wise) of who gets what. I mostly don't want to take something that has a lot of value without accounting for it.
As long as nobody sees anything that they think has a lot more value, I suppose I'll keep it at my original estimate.
 

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I think you may have some top quality tools in that bunch, along with some ordinary ones, and the used value is closer to $500. If those nippers are by Klyenk, they are $20 each. The Wextler clamp is $25, best clamps ever. The Foredom tool with the foot switch, not being able to see the hand piece, could be $300, $40 on the draw knife. The rest looks like $10-20 items but can't see what's in the bag. Your grandfather bought some nice tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think you may have some top quality tools in that bunch, along with some ordinary ones, and the used value is closer to $500. If those nippers are by Klyenk, they are $20 each. The Wextler clamp is $25, best clamps ever. The Foredom tool with the foot switch, not being able to see the hand piece, could be $300, $40 on the draw knife. The rest looks like $10-20 items but can't see what's in the bag. Your grandfather bought some nice tools.
Thanks for your feedback!

The clamp is a Wextler and really does look leaps and bounds above most of the other clamps I've seen.

I did not realize that the Foredom piece could be so expensive. I looked into it a bit more and it seems to be the common #30 hand piece. The similar kits on Ebay seem to go for around $130, but have a different motor head and are in seemingly nicer condition. Not sure if the craftsman motor is better? There is quite a bit of ware on the flex shaft and the cord probably needs replaced.

Here is another (barely) better picture. Do you think for this piece in it's current condition would be around $100?
 

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The Foredom motors are top of the line but they make several different ones. The flex shafts are inexpensive, the hand pieces and foot switches can be $100 each, depending. The foot switch can be used on a scroll saw. Look up the model number on the motor, I don't recognize it. Some are more expensive than others. Craftsman tools are not considered top of the line and are lower value.

You can't buy Wextler clamps at a store, you have to order them from the company. The fact that your grandfather had at least one may mean he knew the difference and where to get them. That could be a sign that he knew about pro quality tools and he might have other top quality tools among the more ordinary ones, or maybe not.

Your estimates for making a comparison of who got how much are probably fine. If there are some better quality tools in the lot you may want to keep them or sell them for their true value. You still have to figure out what they are and establish their condition. They are only worth what someone will pay but people will know and pay a bit more for the top quality stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you Hammer1. I will keep my eyes out for more of those clamps.

He actually seemed to appreciate that not every tool has to be "top of the line" to do the job you need it to do. He was a fan of Harbor Freight and "entry level" for some stuff. Other things were much higher quality. There's a gigantic Bridgeport milling machine that he must have invested a ton of money into. On the other hand, the small spindle sander at his house is a Ryobi. I guess we all do this to a certain extent. I have a few cheap-o tools that do the job well enough.

Thanks again for your insight.
 

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If you're going to use these, there'll be less contention about their worth from your relatives. In similar situations in my family people only get butthurt about the item/value split if someone is selling off the heirlooms.
 

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It's really a matter of being practical. I imagine your grandfather was an experienced craftsman. Like they say in the pool room, it ain't the stick. You don't need the best tools to do the best work but with some business needs, it pays to have better equipment. An experienced pro knows when it counts and when it doesn't. The tools you pictured appear to be in good shape, upper level or not, they can go back to work and that's the real worth.
 
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