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I’m thinking about framing up a little garden shed and the prospect of swinging a hammer all day is less than appealing, but spending a lot on a framing nailer isn’t exactly appealing either.

I don’t need to drive 100 nails per second, it I also don’t want to spend my time clearing jams either.

Can someone recommend a framing nailer that will get the job done for a reasonable cost? Maybe $150 or less.
 

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Try a pawn shop, they have some good tools. My personal preference in nail guns are Bostitch, Porter Cable, Pasload, Makita, Senco and the one I have now is a Ridged, I think it is, anyway it is a good one. When you go to the pawn shop, try to find something wrong like: just look at all the wear on this gun, it is half used up already. Hey, it works for me to get the price down. lol

You can also rent one if you don't plan on using it a lot down the road.
 

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my first full head framing nailer (Porter Cable) was from the pawn shop for $60.
it lasted well over 15 years and was used often.
my second one is a big heavy Senco 702XP from the pawn shop for $80
and that puppy weighs about 10 pounds.
I didn't take that into consideration when I bought it. (and I am 20 years older).
so look at the weight of whatever you decide to go with. (they are not all the same).
but, a good one that is light weight is worth the investment. (IMO).

.
 

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How good are you at tool repair? I have a Bostitch 28 degree you could have for the cost of shipping from the Dallas area. I bought a overhaul kit once and it didn't have half the parts and didn't fix it so I gave up and bought a new one.
 

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spend $20 on construction screws and screw your shed together

not knocking a tool purchase, but a garden shed is hardly a project worth buying a framer for
air nailer, box of 3.25" (framing) and 2.25" (sheathing) nails would probably cost more than the shed
i have my 23 year old cordless paslode framer and finish nail guns that i love
both have had many boxes of nails run thru them
 

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I went through this just a few months ago and decided to try the HF 3-1 nailer. I have no complaints...other than it is heavy as hell! I did have to rip it apart once as a nail go stuck up in the internals.

Now that my project is done, it might site in the drawer till someone wants to borrow it, so I figure it was worth the $100.
 

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spend $20 on construction screws and screw your shed together

not knocking a tool purchase, but a garden shed is hardly a project worth buying a framer for
air nailer, box of 3.25" (framing) and 2.25" (sheathing) nails would probably cost more than the shed
i have my 23 year old cordless paslode framer and finish nail guns that i love
both have had many boxes of nails run thru them
Agree!!
 

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I like Senco but I keep thinking it was the Paslodes a lot of framers talk about...I remember Hitachi got excellent reviews for roofing nailers...
 

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Smart and Cool
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I bought my framer about 20 years ago, at the time Hitachi was the top of the heap. I worked with a local store that rebuilt them, told them I was looking for one, a couple of weeks later they had a rebuilt one for me. It's been trouble free, but it doesn't see a tremendous amount of use.
 

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I agree, Hitachi was top of the line and their name pretty well said the price Hi...tachi. A Pasload or Senco trim gun was running about $300 back then, Hitachi was $400 and worth it.
 

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Last year a bought Hitachi 16 and 18 gauge nailers. No issues with the 16 gauge. However the 18 gauge jams like clockwork. If I put a full stick of nails in it, after I use about 25% of it, the remaining stick separates in about 1/2 and the first nail or two on the back half will overlap the same on the front half and jam. The nail carrier is a hard plastic and the grove the nails ride in is too wide, allowing the overlap. Drives me nuts! And no, I have never dropped it. Just poor manufacturing tolerances. I don’t know about their framing nailer but I won’t buy another Hitachi. Not worth the frustration.
 

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Ancient Termite
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About 20 years ago I bought a Porter Cable framing nailer for $180 (I think) from Home Depot. (IIRC, the HF was $90 at the time.) I did the small job and was done. About 5 years later a flooring contractor took $225 off the job in exchange for the nailer. LOL! But then he wasn't a rocket scientist either.

I would tend to avoid using screws that go into the end grain. Screws just don't hold well in end grain. For framing we use not well dried 2xwhatevers. When we nail things together, the water/sap tends to make the nail adhere to the fir better and makes a very solid long term stabile joint.

I used the framing nailer with a 4 gallon pancake compressor and a 50 foot hose. When that hose was extended by another 100 feet the compressor struggled and could not keep up. I had to wait 15 or 20 seconds between shots. On the 50 foot hose, up in the rafters I could bounce 3 or 4 shots without having to wait.
 
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