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Discussion Starter #1
Well..got it hooked up and, but way too slow. Apparently a motor intended for things like bandsaws, etc., don't particularly work well in a joiner so..need one that goes about 3 x faster.. tried different pullys...all way too slow as well.
Table saw motor perhaps?
 

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Theres only two speeds for AC motors.

The two most common speeds for induction motors used on woodworking power tools are 1725 and 3450 RMP. A 1725 motor would require a 6" pulley on it to turn the same RPMs as a 3" pulley on a 3450 motor, because it's half the speed to start with. Similarly, divide the diameter in half to get the speed on the 3450.

So, a 6" jointer cutterhead should spin at around 4,500 to 5,000 RPMs:
https://www.grizzly.com/products/Grizzly-6-x-48-Jointer-with-Cabinet-Stand/G0814

An 8" jointer spins a little faster at 5,500 RPMs:
https://www.grizzly.com/products/Grizzly-8-x-72-Jointer-with-Built-in-Mobile-Base/G0855

You have an 8" jointer based on your previous post, so you should be looking at turning 5,000 to 5,500 RPMs. If you get a 3450 RPM motor use a 2" pulley on it and a 3" to 4" pulley on the machine.
Often, there is restricted space around where the machine pulley fits, so smaller is better if that's the case. If the pulley is on the end of the cutterhead where there is no restriction you're all set.

I would call Grizzly or Delta tech support and ask what combination of pulley sizes they recommend based on the RPM of the motor you end up with. As far as sources go, Grizzly sells new motors and their motors will be Asian made, but are very good.
https://www.grizzly.com/search?q=(elecrtic+AND+motor+AND+3+AND+HP)+OR+(elecrtic+OR+motor+OR+3+OR+HP)


A great deal on a 3 HP motor on Ebay:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-Dayton...886968&hash=item46b5b1b6e5:g:M40AAOSwxr1fYm1u

Another source for motors is Surplus Center which I have ordered from in the past. Their prices are sometimes half of other sources:
https://www.surpluscenter.com/electric-motors/
Leeson and Marathon are good made in USA brands.


Be aware of "compressor duty motors" as they are not meant for woodworking machines:
https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=ccompressor+duty+motors+on+woodworking+machines

Shaft diameter comes into play when selecting pulleys, typically a 5/8" shaft is most common, bat a 3 HP motor may have a 7/8" shaft. The mounting base is typically a NEMA 56 base, but other bolt configurations like 182 come on larger motors. Not a big deal if you make your own mounting plate. You do not want a C type mounting flange in this case. You do not want a 3 phase motor either. The techs at Grizzly will recommend the correct motor for your application.

You can use a 1 or 1.5 HP motor on a 6" jointer. You should have a 2 or 3 HP motor on an 8" jointer for best performance on face jointing hardwoods. Some jointers have 3 blades, others have 4 blades, more blades equals a finer finish cut for the same spinning speed. So, more is better, more blades and more HP, as a general rule.

:vs_cool:
 
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Well, my choices are limited mainly because of my inherent lack of money. You did mention not to use a compressor motor. Any reason? Right now I have two lose motors, both around 1700 rpms, way too slow. I do have a compressor with a hole in the tank I considered and an old ryobi table saw good for very little.. I'm not sure I can even get a pully to fit the ryobi motor shaft.. By the way, it's a 3 blade deal, an old Dewalt I haven't been able to find the first reference online to..
The base was custom made by someone a long time ago. It's well made, but I don't know exactly what motor it was designed to use. For now we're just using a hinged board bolted to the bottom of the stand..

Another problem I'm having is one of the blades has a lot of wood fiber jammed between the blade and the gib..I can't get the blade to budge in the slightest. The screws all came lose, but even lose nothing budges at all..
Edit: got the blade out and the gib is caked thick with hardened wood fibers.. I can scrape all it off..
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ha! Next question..how can I reinstall the blades? There are no springs, just the gib and blade with 4 set screws to push up against the gib to tighten, but the problem as I see it is the blade is about 3/16ths narrower than the gib so when I drop it into the slot the blade disappears down below the gib with no apparent way to lift it above the gib. I tried a magnet, but it only lifts the gib, not the blade. I have a hunch the old owner just left it in there with a the wood fiber to hold it in place, but I don't know.
just an open slot with the set screws to the right. I'm not sure what is supposed to hold the blade and gib together for installation.
 

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No fun, but I got em in there straight. I don't have a micro measuring gauge, but a straight edge till I see no daylight between the outfeed table and the blade itself so for now that'll have to work. I lost count of how many times I thought I sliced my finger open, but it's blood free.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Pretty much how it worked out. It took me a little while to figure out how to get the blade from falling. Basically I had to tighten the screws a bit too much then back them off till I had just a kiss of friction between the screw and gib and blade. It's tedious since you can't check the height without turning the whole thing without the Allen wrench in place and just the slightest bit of over tighening means pretty much starting over.. Just a tiny bit of tightening at a time..about a 32nd of a turn maybe? Yeah, that's fun on the old knees..
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Pretty much how it worked out. It took me a little while to figure out how to get the blade from falling. Basically I had to tighten the screws a bit too much then back them off till I had just a kiss of friction between the screw and gib and blade. It's tedious since you can't check the height without turning the whole thing without the Allen wrench in place and just the slightest bit of over tighening means pretty much starting over.. Just a tiny bit of tightening at a time..about a 32nd of a turn maybe? Yeah, that's fun on the old knees.. Now I'm back to the motor issue and it probably wouldn't hurt to clean out the other blade with a bit less wood fiber in it..
 

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Discussion Starter #9
One of these days I probably oughta invest in a micro adjustment thingamajig for the joiner and maybe even the table saw, but for now it's working. I had been running soft pine through it and running into problems, but I tried some tzaman and white oak and it came out great even at slower speeds.
The pine was 3/4 material, but I think I'll try heavier inch and a half material and see if it comes out any different..
 

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I have problems with my knees too...in fact, I just had the second one replaced about a month ago. I use a roll around "shop" stool for automotive work, and it adjusts to a good working height for me to do that kind of thing. (I know, because I just did a set of knives about a year ago!).
I think I also used a sharp tool bent at 90 degrees to get under the edges of each side as I was adjusting. I put the end under the knife, and gently pried it up as needed. I managed, after a LOT of fine tuning, to adjust the set screws so that I could still move the blades with the tool, but stiff enough to keep them put while checking the adjustment. Get one blade set, and use a piece of masking tape on the cutter head then mark it with your measurement (on the tape, how far it moves the straight edge), and duplicate that with the other two. I think I spent about an hour just adjusting the knives....I'm learning to be patient!

Brad
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Pine..not so wonderful, but hardwoods and even cedar go through it great. I'll just have to suffer with pine, but expensive hardwoods I think I can stop cutting off that half inch or more on every rough cut board with the TS.. This is a great change from how I had been losing a few inches with every piece of hardwood. Pine is cheap enough I'm not really concerned, but $4.50 per bf of hardwood? Quite a different story.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have problems with my knees too...in fact, I just had the second one replaced about a month ago. I use a roll around "shop" stool for automotive work, and it adjusts to a good working height for me to do that kind of thing. (I know, because I just did a set of knives about a year ago!).
I think I also used a sharp tool bent at 90 degrees to get under the edges of each side as I was adjusting. I put the end under the knife, and gently pried it up as needed. I managed, after a LOT of fine tuning, to adjust the set screws so that I could still move the blades with the tool, but stiff enough to keep them put while checking the adjustment. Get one blade set, and use a piece of masking tape on the cutter head then mark it with your measurement (on the tape, how far it moves the straight edge), and duplicate that with the other two. I think I spent about an hour just adjusting the knives....I'm learning to be patient!

Brad
Ain't getting old funner than a barrel of monkeys? There is at least one upside to it though and that's being able to take naps whenever you damned well feel like it and nobody asks questions about your morality.. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Something I really like about this setup is the chute that puts the shavings right where they're easy to sweep up. For someone without dust collection setup anywhere this works great..

I kind of wish the planer had one..
 

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Ain't getting old funner than a barrel of monkeys? There is at least one upside to it though and that's being able to take naps whenever you damned well feel like it and nobody asks questions about your morality.. lol
My father used to say, "Getting old is not for sissies!"
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Best part of getting old is taking afternoon naps and nobody questions your integrity about it!
When you're young you're either a lazy SOB or you must be sick. When you're old everyone pretty much expects it. It occurs somewhere around 59 7/8s..
 
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