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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Some examples:

Table Wood Wood stain Hardwood Gas
Wood Table Flooring Floor Workbench


Modified for table saw height used in front or back for big panels or long rips.

Shelving Shelf Wood Gas Box


Against the wall for most operations.

Wood Wheel Mode of transport Beam Hardwood


In the middle of the room for large panel finishing.
I have fixed benches, but I find my three roll arounds in use for most every project.
How many of you also use roll around benches?
 

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Chester's Gorilla
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I have one that mostly stays behind the table saw for outfeed, but rolls around as an auxiliary workspace. I used locking casters. Did you also, or are the benches heavy enough to not move?
 

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dbnewton
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My bench is permanently secured to the wall. But my planer and joiner are on one cart (w/locking casters) and my belt/disk sander and spindle sander are on another cart. Power cords for carts are overhead so wheels don't run into cords.

I prefer the bench secure because it has two vice that sometimes see a lot of force.
 

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Just about everything in my shop is on wheels. Mostly retractable wheels. Almost everything is also about 1/8" lower than my table saw - for obvious reasons. The only work table/bench that is not on wheels houses my drill press and chop saw. The table that is utilized/mobilized the most is my table saw outfeed table/assembly table. My shop is 12x35.
 

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Not exactly on the topic of wheels - what shape would you prefer for your shop. Tony B said his is 12x35. That's 420 square feet. 20x20 would be about the same square footage. Which shape would you find more functional? Why?
 

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@Woodworking Wolf
Let me start off by saying that I rent this place. It is a self storage location.
I have had both squarish and long and narrow. When talking 6000 square feet, it really didn't matter much. But when talking 420 square feet, to me it makes a tremendous difference. Length is very important to me because of my work habits.
I unload plywood from my van/truck laying flat and slide it onto my table saw. Slide it off my table saw and onto my outfeed/assembly table. Roll my assembly table to the rear of the shop where I have my vertical storage. Slide my plywood off the rolling table and onto the step of my vertical storage rack. Raise the end of the ply (still resting on the table) and lay it flat against my vertical storage rage rack which is slightly angled backward toward the wall.
With a 35' 'runway' my table saw is 5 feet from the door. the saw is approx 2 1/2 feet F to R. My outfeed/assy table is 6 feet long. My vertical wood storage rack is approx 2' deep resting against back wall .That gives me approx 20' of open space between my table saw and the storage rack. When not cutting long boards, I keep my outfeed/assy table about 5 feet from the table saw. That gives me plenty walk around space between the assy table. and the table saw and leaves me around 15' between the saay table and the wood rack. Thats more than enough space to set my current furniture projects on the floor and still work on the rest of it on the assy table. Both side walls have woodworking machines and shelves. They take up approx 2' on each side. that leaves me approx 8' of open space between sides. More than enough to spin my 6' outfeed/assy table around.
When lathe turning, I move the assy table towards the rear. Roll the lathe around 5 or 6' from the rear of the table saw. with my back to the open front door. My tools rest on the table saw top so that I can just turn around and reach them as I need them. The biggest advantage is that most of the shavings that travel over my head land on the floor just short of the front door. Lots easier to sweep up and little to no shavings along the side walls behind machines and tables.
My step son-in-law had a 2 car garage which was around 20 x 20. We had approx same same tools and machines and storage. My last shop was 10 x 30 with a similar arrangement and it was easier to work in than his garage.
My current 12 x 35 gives me 94' of wall space counting the door. If your 20x20 was 20 x 21 giving us same square footage, you wall space would be 82'
 

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Sometimes space constraints force it on you.

My woodshop is the 22’x30’ 2 car portion of my 3.5 car garage with the garage door facing west.

Things have to move, so I can park in there.

The router table/miter station, storage cabinets, spindle sander, jig storage, and bandsaw are along the south wall with dust collection in the south east corner.

Table saw is on a mobile base that pulls out from the east wall. There is also a non mobile workbench on that wall for hand tool work.

On the north wall is the jointer/planer on a mobile base, an out feed/assembly table with flip down casters, wood storage racks on the wall, and sheet storage behind the table(not that I keep much of that around since I hate to store it).

I also have overhead racks for storage of odd sized sheets, weird cutoffs, and projects I have to set aside for longer than I’d like.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Retired engineer
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I finally caved in and put wheels on my bench. I rarely move it, but when I do, I really appreciate them. My whole shop is on wheels because the driveway is my "shop annex." I can't move in the garage; it is just where I store wood and tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
I have one that mostly stays behind the table saw for outfeed, but rolls around as an auxiliary workspace. I used locking casters. Did you also, or are the benches heavy enough to not move?
The medium bench, used in front and back of the table saw also doubles as an assembly/glue up table. It does have locking casters. It's 23.5" wide by 65" long. The base is slightly narrower so it can roll throughout the shop. I have a smaller bench that is really just a material cart 20" wide and 51.75" long that does not have locks. The bigger bench, 31" deep by 62.5" wide has a 2' flip up end extension for holding longer projects when it's away from the home wall space. This bench is taller than the other moblie table saw aux tables at 38". I use it a lot for hand tool operations and router stuff. It does not have locking casters but weighs about 300 lbs. I still clamp a stabilizing pole that rests against a wall or other immobile surface if I'm routing something big. For hand tool operations, it holds still.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Not exactly on the topic of wheels - what shape would you prefer for your shop. Tony B said his is 12x35. That's 420 square feet. 20x20 would be about the same square footage. Which shape would you find more functional? Why?
I've got an "L" shaped 672 sq. ft. shop built in 2002. It's shop #7. I'm not planning another. I've got all my machines on wheeled stands with stabilizing pads or locks. I still change my mind on shop layouts and sometimes I need to expand assembly spaces if I'm building larger sized projects in the winter and can't use the drive outside for the assembly annex. Shoving drill presses and lathes together is an option. After all, nobody really needs three drill presses..... except sometimes they do.
 

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I've got an "L" shaped 672 sq. ft. shop built in 2002. It's shop #7. I'm not planning another. I've got all my machines on wheeled stands with stabilizing pads or locks. I still change my mind on shop layouts and sometimes I need to expand assembly spaces if I'm building larger sized projects in the winter and can't use the drive outside for the assembly annex. Shoving drill presses and lathes together is an option. After all, nobody really needs three drill presses..... except sometimes they do.
Good point, I never thought of rearranging the shop based on the project. I can see times when I would want to do that. Certainly adds to the idea of making your machines portable.
 

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Let me just say this about that.
Don't buy cheap wheels. The brakes wont hold much and the wont last long either.
Also, sweeping is a must. Dont take much to stop a small wheel from rolling.
I use nothing but 2 1/2" and 3' Wheels.
Most wheels I used are retractable. Especially on heavy work benches.
Expect to spend around $40 and up for a set of 4.

One of the unintended positive perks is that sweeping and blowdown is really easy and quick with everything on wheels.
 
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Termite
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If you intend to use the bottom for storage I would add wheels if it need be moved. If it’s just a top with bottom support I wouldn’t . You could probably push it that easy. If you intend to weight it down with accessories you might look into a pallet jack for your shop. My bench is in the rear so I don’t have to move it..
 

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Some examples:

View attachment 439176 View attachment 439302

Modified for table saw height used in front or back for big panels or long rips.

View attachment 439177

Against the wall for most operations.

View attachment 439178

In the middle of the room for large panel finishing.
I have fixed benches, but I find my three roll arounds in use for most every project.
How many of you also use roll around benches?
I have done the same thing. My work bench is on lockable casters set to the height of my table saw. Your bench is real nice looking. Mine I started doing years ago. A simple trestle base with a solid core door slab for the top. When it gets to beat I flip it over. When that side gets beat I get my lumber yard to give me a damaged door on the cheap. Underneath on the trestles is where I store my clamps.
 

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where's my table saw?
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work benches VS assembly tables VS work supports.
They are all different from one another, but may double up on some functions.
My two main work benches never move. They weigh 200 lbs + for the metal shop and almost the same for the wood shop. Too heavy to move around without a floor jack.
My assembly table is attached to my outfeed and table saw, so it never moves. it's also very heavy.
My work supports are light, collapsible and easy to store and move into place when needed.
If you want wheels on a workbench, then get industrial rated casters with substantial locks.
They need to "stay put" when locked in place with "grippy" wheels the won't slide when sideways forces are applied. It's a safety issue.

Power tools on wheels should be treated the same, stay put, don't wiggle or wobble in use OR bad things will happen.
My table saw is on casters, BUT it has rubber base leveling pads that help secure it to the floor.
I welded up a heavy duty frame with foot extensions with the casters up underneath for my 10" Craftsman saw:
Wheel Wood Motor vehicle Red Automotive wheel system


My 12" Powermatic needed a large frame:
Table Motor vehicle Machine tool Wood Automotive exterior
 
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