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Countersinks

I have been using the insti-bit set from Rockler.com for several years. It consists of different size countersinks with tapered pilot bits that can be adjusted in regards to depth. Once you drill your pilot hole/countersink combination, you slip on the sleeve that holds the driver and set the screw before you move to the next hole. Very convenient.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I wouldn't recommend the Hitachi ones that lowes sells. The countersinks are good but the drill bits are junk. They have a slot that a stopper screw hits for depth adjustment. All of mine broke along the slot and I'm pretty careful not to break drill bits.
Hah, too late! :censored: Already broke the bit on #8 & #10. That's why I'm here. I'm also thinking maybe the countersinks don't have sharp enough edges to cut through hardwood so I'm having to apply more pressure than need be.

I also need to know if there are any retailers who might have good ones--that I can walk in and buy and not have to order out of a catalog or online. I'm kind of in a time crunch.
 

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Countersinks

In a crunch you can go to Sears or even some automotive parts stores for standalone countersinks. If you have a specialty hardwood supplier close by, no doubt they have them as well. If worse comes to worse, order on line and then use a larger drill bit to create the countersink. Just be careful, this would best be done in a drill press if at all possible. You may also consider using a different type of screw (online order also). I use a flat head screw I get from Mcfeeleys.com that has a rib under the head that is capable of creating it's own countersink. Plenty of options but nothing for right now I guess. Good luck.

Ed
 

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johnep
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countersinks

Turbogold screws from Screwfix have ribs under head and I rarely have to countersink or drill a pilot hole. only improvement would be to use a torx head rather than pozidrive. slotted screws belong in a museum.
johnep
 

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Slotted screws

Amen to burrying the slotted screw. Ancient technology that has no place in the hands of todays craftsman.
 

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johnep
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countersinks

looking in my trusty screwfix catalouge, they list a TC countersink.
Perhaps a router bit might do you.
johnep
 

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The only countersinks worthy of consideration for hardwood are Fuller brand w tapered bits and Amana w/ carbide if durability is a big issue. Neither are inexpensive but are worth the extra expense. Not available at Lowes or Home Depot.
 

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I know this thread is VERY old but it seemed like the right place to ask my question. I have the Bosch 3 piece countersink set. I noticed the #6 countersink has a 9/64 drill bit on it. #8 has 11/64.

Wood magazine had a nice screwchart that I'm sure most of you have seen. It states the following for pilot hole size:

Softwood Hardwood
#6 5/64 3/32
#8 3/32 7/64

To me it seems like the 9/64 drill bit for the #6 is WAY too big. Dewalt, Make it Snappy, all have the same sizes so I'm assuming they're correct. Kobalt has a 3 piece set that seems to make more sense and match the screw chart but....it's Kobalt, I'd think Bosch and Dewalt would be right.

Am I missing something here? I used a #6 screw last night with the Bosch countersink and I could push the screw pretty far down into the pilot hole before I had to screw it in. Maybe this is the way it's supposed to work? I just know I wouldn't be using a 9/64 drill bit for a #6 screw. Can anyone shed any light on this subject?
 

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Hardwoods need a slightly larger hole than softwoods or engineered product.
 

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But you wouldn't use a 9/64 drill bit to drill a pilot hole for a #6 screw, right? I would use a 5/64.....so why would a 9/64 be used for the countersink?
 
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