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I have some enormous (12 feet long, 2 feet wide, three inches thick) aquidneck beech from a tree that we had cut down. They have been curing inside in a dry space for about a year. I was thinking about making an *insane* dining room table from them. The only problem is that I need a crew to lift one and I can't imagine a joiner big enough. So, I was thinking circular saw and them an old fashioned hand joiner. Thoughts?
 

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I have some enormous (12 feet long, 2 feet wide, three inches thick) aquidneck beech from a tree that we had cut down. They have been curing inside in a dry space for about a year. I was thinking about making an *insane* dining room table from them. The only problem is that I need a crew to lift one and I can't imagine a joiner big enough. So, I was thinking circular saw and them an old fashioned hand joiner. Thoughts?

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I'm including this excerpt from one of my other posts:

For example I had three Mahogany boards that were 20" wide, 18' long and 12/4 thick. I couldn't cross cut them because I needed the lengths, but I had to rip them. So, jointing was the first step, and wound up tipping over a jointer. Ripping on the TS was a feat of strength just to push it through. Some procedures call for two men.

Some of the size problems can be solved in how and what you order for the project. The problem I had was I needed all my solid wood from the same batch, and I didn't want to run out. It also depends on what's available.


There are those times when going to hand tools can be necessary. It's a PITA if that is also the time to learn how to use them.










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.....insane dining room table.... a crew to lift [one board]......Thoughts?



Besides "wow" my only thought was about reinforcing the dining room floor before everyone gathers for thanksgiving!
 

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The good news is that you should have a couple more years before they are dry enough to make a table. I usually figure at least one year per inch. Hopefully someone else will chime in and either confirm or add more info. on air drying thick lumber. In the mean time you could brush up on the "Old School Way". After that, there is no reason that you could not true them up with a jointer plane. All you have to do is chalk a line down the length and plane down to it. If you do not all ready have a plane you can find one at a flea market or on e-bay. I would look for a Stanley/Bailey no.7 or a no.8. Another option might be a hand power planer. I have never used one of them so I can't speak from experience.
 

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Welcome!
The good news is that you should have a couple more years before they are dry enough to make a table. I usually figure at least one year per inch. Hopefully someone else will chime in and either confirm or add more info. on air drying thick lumber. In the mean time you could brush up on the "Old School Way". After that, there is no reason that you could not true them up with a jointer plane. All you have to do is chalk a line down the length and plane down to it. If you do not all ready have a plane you can find one at a flea market or on e-bay. I would look for a Stanley/Bailey no.7 or a no.8. Another option might be a hand power planer. I have never used one of them so I can't speak from experience.
KD is an option. I wouldn't use a hand power plane for jointing. It's very aggressive and very difficult to keep a minimized edge. Too easy to screw up fast. I use them mostly for passage doors.










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