Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello to all here. I am new to this forum, but am moderately experienced in amateur woodwork.

I am presently building some simple bookshelves from 3/4" oak plywood and will be using some 1/4" x 3/4" oak strips to cover the front edges to hide the laminations. I plan to glue them for the best appearance but have had some problems with getting the right amount of glue in joints before this. I will be doing this on saw horses as I am in the process of building a shop and do not have a good wood working table at the present time. I plan to add some 1" wire nails in the front edge of the plywood, leaving the heads sticking up. I will then cut the heads off with some heavy pliers as close as I can, leaving a short (1/16" or less) and sharp point sticking out. These should keep the wood strips aligned while I tighten the clamps but they will not stick through the oak strips so they will not be visible. I have not tried this technique before so does anybody see any problems with it?

As for the glue, I know I will get a little bit squeezed out of the joint, but I want to keep this to a minimum so the sanding will also be kept to a minimum. I plan to stain and seal with water based stain and polyurethane so I do not want any glue to interfere with the uniformity of the stain. Also, the glue will be the sole holding force in the joint so I need sufficient coverage so it holds well. I would appreciate any suggestions on applying and spreading the glue to get good coverage up to or at least near to the edge without any excessive amount being squeezed out. Should I use the glue full strength or thin it? What is best for spreading it, brush (foam or bristle), roller of some type, or what? Any special techniques that would help?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

Paul A.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I never said I wasn't going to sand. But glue penetrates the grain and I do not want to have to sand too deep.

Re: other answers

I have both standard size and detail size biscuit cutters and biscuits. I use and love them. But I don't think that I am skilled enough to use any of them on a trim strip that is only 1/4" deep. Likewise for cutting a tongue or groove on them. The strips are already made, I just bought them. I did say simple shelves, didn't I?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Been away from this project for a week or so. But I finished cutting the plywood into widths yesterday. I was cutting in the driveway, outside of my overcrowded garage and yesterday was a nice, slightly cool day. So I hope to start gluing the edge strips today.

I carefully read all the above comments. I did consider iron on veneer: I have used it before with good results. But the local lumber yards have only a small amount in stock. I need a bunch for this because I am building four shelf units and I have been burned before by depending on them to restock an item. Waited a year once and they never got any more. And they lie about it. I guess I could have purchased it on line. But I also want a more durable edge.

As for the clamping problems, I do plan on using a 1x2 or an aluminum bar to spread the clamping force evenly. This is one reason why I feel the wire nails are needed. I have a bunch of 12" clamps so I should be able to glue two edge strips at once. I'll see how it works on the first one.

Anyway, thanks for all the comments. I'll let you know how it works out.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
After all the good discussion and advise, I wanted to show the results. Here is the first board with the edging strip being glued to it.



As you can see, I did go with the 1/4" x 3/4" oak strips and I did use the cut-off nails. In spite of the fact that I inspected each trim strip in the store for any curves, I found that this one did have some significant ones. So it did need to be straightened as I glued it. I found that the nails do help keep it in place, but they also did allow some room to move it a bit. What I did not expect was that they will go deeper into the laminations of the plywood as the trim strip is clamped down. They started out protruding about 1/16" when I trimmed them with the cutters and wound up at 1/32" or less. This is probably why I was able to slightly reposition the strip while clamping.

I wound up spreading the glue with a 6" cotton swab: I keep packs of them in the shop for all kinds of uses and they were handy. And you just throw it away: no cleaning. What surprised me is I got no squeeze out. Not a single drop. I was really surprised.

I am using some inexpensive clamps (HF) as I knew I needed a lot of them. I had to remove the pins from the end of the bars to allow them to have a bit more capacity. I may drill new holes closer to the ends when I put them back. That is a 1/4" x 1" aluminum bar that I used to even out the clamping pressure. I needed more clamps than I first thought so it was a good thing that I bought a dozen of them. I bought about 10 more of a better quality and another aluminum bar so I can glue two boards at once.

One down and about 18 to go. With all the other demands on my time, I still will need some time to glue all of them.

Anyway, it appears to be well underway. Thanks again to all.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top