Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys can any one please advise me on the best method of gluing Formica to mdf tried contact adhesive with very poor results. many thanks carl.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
Hi guys can any one please advise me on the best method of gluing Formica to mdf tried contact adhesive with very poor results. many thanks carl.
You could use a brush, roller, a spreader, or in a spray cup and gun. I use solvent base contact cement. The laminate should only take one application, and the MDF may take two. It's difficult to get the second application applied unless you're spraying. If brushing or rolling, the dried cement wants to stick to the applicator. I usually allow at least ¼" oversize for the laminate. Make sure there are no chips or debris on each piece before or after gluing.

Allow about 15 - 30 minutes for it to "flash" dry. It will feel just a bit tacky when ready. If it's for a countertop, I'll use ½" dowel rods about 10" apart to keep the laminate off the glued top, and to position it. Once in position, I'll slowly slide out the center dowel, and touch the laminate down to position it. Once that's done, I work from the center out...sliding out the dowels, and pressing down. Ultimately, use a "J" roller, or the edge of a block of wood and press out the air from the center out to the edges. Then rout off the overhang with a flush trim bit.






.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,984 Posts
Hi guys can any one please advise me on the best method of gluing Formica to mdf tried contact adhesive with very poor results. many thanks carl.
Contact is a very common way to glue formica. Did you use the water based or flammable liquid cement? The flammable type will works better. I like the Weldwood original contact cement. I have some laminate I glued 40 years ago that is still stuck well. It also works better if the cement is sprayed but can be rolled with a texture roller. The glue really needs a texture to it and the texture roller will pull at the glue giving it a texture. It's possible you didn't get enough cement on or you didn't let the cement dry long enough before you stuck it. You should roll a liberal amount of glue on both the mdf and the formica and let it dry to the point you can touch it and it feels like rubber but nothing transfers to your fingers. Then lay some sticks of wood or dowels across the work to lay the laminate so you can align it in position to stick it. You can also use wood glue on smaller pieces or a resin glue on larger sheets. On larger pieces wood glue tends to glue around the edges and stay wet in the middle. The resin glue will dry all the way across the sheet.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
You can also use wood glue on smaller pieces or a resin glue on larger sheets. On larger pieces wood glue tends to glue around the edges and stay wet in the middle. The resin glue will dry all the way across the sheet.
I wouldn't recommend using wood glue or resin type glues, as the laminate backing isn't porous enough for a good bond. I'm guessing that someone will chime in saying they used those glues 30 years ago and have had no problems, and the laminate is still stuck down good. We'll wait and see.:laughing:






.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,984 Posts
I wouldn't recommend using wood glue or resin type glues, as the laminate backing isn't porous enough for a good bond. I'm guessing that someone will chime in saying they used those glues 30 years ago and have had no problems, and the laminate is still stuck down good. We'll wait and see.:laughing:










.
Actually wood glue and resin glue is a better adhesive for laminate than contact cement. It's just too time consuming to use in commercial shops that don't have a wood welder. Most of the commercial shops in the Dallas area only warranty laminate to stay on for five years done with contact cement.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top