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My project is a poker chip carrier made with laminated walnut and white oak. 9" x 6" x 4". I will cut out the poker chip holes from the completed solid block. Any special techniques to gluing 7 alternating strips, 3/8 inches thick? Need to alternate grains akin to plywood? All ideas welcome, Thanks
 

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David
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Welcome to the forum! I would just arrange them for their figure and grain patterns. You probably won't have to worry about anything warping or bowing in something like that. Just glue it up and leave alone overnight to make sure all the glue is cured/dry.

David
 

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Welcome to the forum! I would just arrange them for their figure and grain patterns. You probably won't have to worry about anything warping or bowing in something like that. Just glue it up and leave alone overnight to make sure all the glue is cured/dry.

David
David- Thanks for the prompt reply. I'm a 78 year old "semi-newbie" just trying to keep active during all this Covid mess. I agree to let my Titebond-III sit up for 24 hours. Any thoughts about another wood to contrast with the walnut? Maple? Ash? Poplar? If I get a new enough 40mm bit it should be a good project. Thanks- Crady
 

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My project is a poker chip carrier made with laminated walnut and white oak. 9" x 6" x 4". I will cut out the poker chip holes from the completed solid block. Any special techniques to gluing 7 alternating strips, 3/8 inches thick? Need to alternate grains akin to plywood? All ideas welcome, Thanks
If I am imagining this right it is going to be cube like? If so I would make two plates, anything rigid will do. What you want to do is apply even pressure across. Double layers of 3/4 MDF would be cheap, flat, and rigid. Place your glue up between the two plates, making sure you wax the inside faces of the plates so they do not glue up to your project. Apply equal clamping pressure to the 4 corners of the plates.
 

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If I am imagining this right it is going to be cube like? If so I would make two plates, anything rigid will do. What you want to do is apply even pressure across. Double layers of 3/4 MDF would be cheap, flat, and rigid. Place your glue up between the two plates, making sure you wax the inside faces of the plates so they do not glue up to your project. Apply equal clamping pressure to the 4 corners of the plates.
Thanks for your reply. What I had in mind was seven layers between 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" thick to make up a solid block 6" x 9". I'm using walnut for a couple of the layers and either maple, white oak, ash, beech or poplar for contrast. Not sure what you suggest about applying wax. Could you please elaborate? Any thoughts regarding the wood selections? Thanks
 

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Thanks for your reply. What I had in mind was seven layers between 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" thick to make up a solid block 6" x 9". I'm using walnut for a couple of the layers and either maple, white oak, ash, beech or poplar for contrast. Not sure what you suggest about applying wax. Could you please elaborate? Any thoughts regarding the wood selections? Thanks
The plates that you make up to apply the even pressure, picture it like a sandwich. Any time I do glue ups I wax anything I do not want glued with butchers wax, including my work bench. You would be surprised how easy it is to glue something you do not want glued, such as cauls, and how dumb I feel when I do it.
 
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