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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I guess i could buy a nice ash blank on ebay for less than 25 bucks, but i've got some scrap that's a good length but doesn't have the thickness.

does this sound like a bad idea? the grain i know is important, and perhaps the feel would be odd to have 2 woods' weights.

just wondering....
 

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I simply don't know.

I read time and again that a good glue joint is stronger than the wood around it ... and laminated beams can support a greater weight than a simple piece of tree the same dimensions.

:huh:
 

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I really don't know either. I do a lot of glue ups over the years and a good long grain glue joint is stronger than the wood. However I have never looked at the shock value of the same joint. I've never seen a bat made from anything but solid wood unless it's for show so there must be something to that. If it's for a child to use occasionally I wouldn't worry about it. If it's for serious use then I would go with what we know works, solid wood.
 

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Laminated wood has entirely different dynamics that a solid piece of wood.

No. Do not attempt unless it is purely for show.

George
 

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While I agree that glue joints are strong it is still very different dynamics you are dealing with. I made my living for years using and depending on different adhesives along with learning their properties.

Glue joints are going to change the ability of the glued material to absorb and direct applied stresses in a manner that will allow them to not fracture under sudden pressure. Comparing a moving mass (bat) striking a second moving mass (ball) in a very confined area is not the same as a beam that is designed to absorb pressure of a wide area and then send the load to other bearing surfaces.

In short I don't think I would trust it. :blink:
 

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If you've never turned a bat and want some bat making practice I couldn't think of a better way to use your odds and ends being this probably isn't going to the majors.

I made one years ago from ash, the wood of choice, and it would sting the hands something awful from vibration. If I knew where it is I'd probably burn it for stove wood.
 

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I don't see why it wouldn't work with the exception of appearance. I have a woodcarving mallet that is glued up scraps of ash. The head of it was also bored out and filled with lead and it holds up fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
All of these are exactly what went through my head.

No one's said, bah...who cares just try it and if it breaks no biggie. the real ones break all the time.

but i guess it could be dangerous if it was more susceptible to breaking. then i thought about somehow keeping it together with a good athletic tape or something.

i wonder if people have tried different types of woods. maple, hickory, and ash and definitely really hard woods. I'm wondering about weird grains like elm that they use for wheel hubs...or old growth vs new.

etc...

anyhoo...i just started turning this week so maybe the practice would be good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
i'm doing both by the way! thanks for the input!

I'll make a smaller one with the ones together, and if i survive not being impailed with wood, i ordered an ash blank
 

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According to the Louisville Slugger factory, Hickory was tried for the major leagues but it was determined to be too heavy because of the interest in bat swing speed.
 

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A view from another angle:

My guess is that a laminated bat would be considered "illegal" in any kind of league play. If the bat had produced hits or homers during the game, it could lead to a forfeit. Imagine explaining that to the other little league parents!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
ha. i'm probably going to just play pick up games with friends. not even games. more like a sandlot of grown men where we just throw a ball around and hit it.


I doubt anyone is going to pitch more than 50 mph.
 

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ha. i'm probably going to just play pick up games with friends. not even games. more like a sandlot of grown men where we just throw a ball around and hit it.


I doubt anyone is going to pitch more than 50 mph.
I'm sure glad to see someone that can still have fun in life without involving code gods.

You could even make one painted pink for the girls if they would ever care to play. But that might involve code gods where you guys couldn't even look at it much less touch it.:laughing:
 

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I simply don't know.

I read time and again that a good glue joint is stronger than the wood around it ... and laminated beams can support a greater weight than a simple piece of tree the same dimensions.

:huh:
I always hear that too. Funny how glue is touted as stronger than the wood. Yet most breaks I've seen on glued-up panels occur right there at the glue joint. Though the glue itself doesn't shear apart, breaks still occurs at or very near the glue joint a lot more often than would be expected by chance.

Anyone know why that is? What's happening to make the wood a grain or two away from the glue the weakest point? I think it's the fact that the glue on the joint often isn't making as much surface contact as the wood fibers make against themselves. So, suddenly, the glue joint actually DOES become the weakest point. Because there is a line where glue meets wood. And in the midst of that line is air pockets, no matter how well you spread and pack the glue. This increases any forces at the actual wood-glue contact barrier.

My point is that breakage is more likely to occur with a glue joint present, particularly in high shock conditions. I know some may argue against my reasoning. After all, there's all this lore that glue joints are stronger than solid wood. Sure, a given glue line may be stronger than a given weak grain line of a given board. I just don't quite buy that story as an overarching truth. I've SEEN too many breaks AT glue joints to be convinced of this being anything but a myth.

Perhaps the myth - or, at the least, overconfidence - stems from the fact that strengths in one board can compensate for a fault in another if they are bound together (glued or otherwise). In that case, yes, a particular cracked or weak board will be stronger if glued to another board in such a way that the weakness is supported by the one it's glued to.

With all other factors equal, a solid thick blank is going to be stronger than the same thickness created via laminated glue-ups. It has to be.

Sorry if this tangent diverts the thread a little.
 
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