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The last time I glued up a large panel (top for a dresser) I had access to a 30" planer, I glued up 4/4 stock then planed to 3/4 thickness.

I no longer have access to a planer that wide. What do most of you use if your gluing up a wide panel (wider than a planer you have).

I want to know if you plane all boards to your desired thickness then glue them up using biscuits to make sure they are flush?

What is the process you use when gluing up wide panels.

Sorry I didn't search this before posting so if this has been covered before I apologize.
 

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Scotty D
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Glue up whatever width your planer will handle.

Plane those to just above desired thickness.

Glue up multiples to achieve desired width.

Finally... Let the sanding begin. :yes:

The better your glue up.... the less sanding.
 

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Or you can use the a router sled time consuming but accurate. Also a jointer plane works. There are a few different ways. Head to you tube or google and weed them out one will work for you.
 

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I used to be spoiled, too, with large equipment and a wide belt. Now that I'm in a small shop without those things, I had to start thinking differently. Now, I plane to thickness before glue up, use cauls to keep things flat and aligned, don't make a mess with glue, then hit it with a beltsander. I don't use biscuits.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Clever!

I used to be spoiled, too, with large equipment and a wide belt. Now that I'm in a small shop without those things, I had to start thinking differently. Now, I plane to thickness before glue up, use cauls to keep things flat and aligned, don't make a mess with glue, then hit it with a beltsander. I don't use biscuits.
Clever use of that insulating foam to keep the clamps off the wood and prevent staining! :thumbsup: bill

This idea using Redibolts, available up to 36" long, maybe longer, with a little deeper frame could be used for wider panels and avoid the cost of clamps at up to $20.00 including pipe. The threads can be covered with thinwall EMT or painters tape.
 

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I have a 13" planer. If I am making a panel larger than that, I will make multiple panels up to 13". Then glue them together and sand the seem really good with my ROS.

David
 

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What do most of you use if your gluing up a wide panel (wider than a planer you have).

I want to know if you plane all boards to your desired thickness then glue them up using biscuits to make sure they are flush?
I have a 20" planer. If I need a 30" wide board I will glue up 2 separate sections of around 15" each, plane them slightly thicker than I need then edge glue the boards. I will now only have one joint to deal with. I have a Porter Cable 4X24 belt sander. It is a beast and will make quick work of that one joint. Then sand the whole table. I never use biscuits. I have better luck just edge gluing and lining up the edges as I clamp.
 

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a couple of times here people have said that they don't use biscuits, is it just a personal choice or is there another reason.
I've used biscuits on panels with good luck, I always figured it would give it a little extra strenght.
I know glue is strong, but the butt joints have always made me want it a little stronger
 

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Someday-flying furniture
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a couple of times here people have said that they don't use biscuits, is it just a personal choice or is there another reason.
I've used biscuits on panels with good luck, I always figured it would give it a little extra strenght.
I know glue is strong, but the butt joints have always made me want it a little stronger
I like biscuts too (for alignment reasons), but it is more work on the joint. Most panels have more than enough edge surface area to form a strong glued joint.

So I would guess that is the reason, it's just more work.
 

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biscuts??

I have read that their may be some swelling at the biscuit's I guess this could happen if you were not in the middle of the board? Maybe like 75% to the top ? I have used biscuits and no problum, like you said a little more work. Also i have just edge glued and no problum their eather? One main thing is have good edge's like no daylite when looking thro the seem's i guess your choice
 

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Old School
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a couple of times here people have said that they don't use biscuits, is it just a personal choice or is there another reason.
I've used biscuits on panels with good luck, I always figured it would give it a little extra strenght.
I know glue is strong, but the butt joints have always made me want it a little stronger
I don't use biscuits for edge glue ups. They don't insure alignment...that's what cauls and clamps are for. Biscuits can actually weaken a glue up. If anything I would use a full spline, that's close fitting.










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+1 on the cauls and clamps....that's what I do as well. I don't use biscuits....just edge glue.......I joint and plane all my boards and leave them a little thicker than final thickness......once I take everything out of the clamps i take the entire panel over to a local lumber mill and have them run it through their 36 inch sander to get it to the thickness I want and to get rid of any glue residue. Come out nice and flat and clean. I just had them do a 24 X 35 inch panel for me. I think it cost about 1.60. I get it back, do some finish sanding and it's ready for finishing
 

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I don't use biscuits for edge glue ups. They don't insure alignment...that's what cauls and clamps are for. Biscuits can actually weaken a glue up. If anything I would use a full spline, that's close fitting.













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+1 for me
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Wow thanks for the many replies, lots of good ideas to try and see what works best for me.
Thanks
 

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a couple of times here people have said that they don't use biscuits, is it just a personal choice or is there another reason.
I've used biscuits on panels with good luck, I always figured it would give it a little extra strenght.
I know glue is strong, but the butt joints have always made me want it a little stronger
I'm leery about biscuits, especially when a lot of faces are involved. I find that they can to be off just a little and with several faces involved, you won't get the flat surface that you are looking for. I agree with cabinetman in that clamps and cauls are the way to go.
 

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Newbie questions here....

What is the order of gluing/clamping? Do you edge clamp the boads together so as to get and remove the glue squeeze out BEFORE you put the cauls on, or do you put the cauls on and then edge clamp? I don't see how the cauls can do their job unless they're in place before any clamping...but then how do you keep the caul from being a permanent fixture from glue squeezing out?

Is the goal with glue just to completely cover the surface, but be a thin coating?

For gluing up large panels, do you put glue on both edges to be joined?
 

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I agree with no biscuits. I do a lot of teak counter tops we Just do edge glue on these tops. Some of these tops are massive
2 1/4" thick 50" x 12' granted I am fortunate to have a wide belt sander. But prep and the glue up is key
 

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In History is the Future
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I don't use biscuits for edge glue ups. They don't insure alignment...that's what cauls and clamps are for. Biscuits can actually weaken a glue up. If anything I would use a full spline, that's close fitting.










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Full splines for me too... especially on a thicker piece like a table top... adds a bit of extra detail too...

I don't run tight "perfect" splines though... can make it a lot tougher to get good edge alignment. I look at it as mainly extra surface area for my glue to grab a hold of.

I make a snug fitting spline then run a #6 or 7 plane lightly over 2 sides... works well ~
 
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