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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I built this about 10 years ago and it starting to fall apart. I could just rebuild it, but don’t want to because i have too much to do as it is.
I have a place for it in my garden and thought if it were possible to glue it along with some long screws, I would keep it. The lattice is plastic and the frame is redwood. I originally used redwood lattice, but it only lasted a year or two and I replaced it with plastic. I primed each individual piece all the way around before assembling it and painting it, but the screws came loose anyway. A few of the screws actually broke and I would use a larger screw this time around.




This is what it looked like 10years

 

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For what you are doing I believe I would use gorilla glue. It's kinda messy but you can trim what swells out with a sharp knive. Be sure to caulk around it good and put some fresh paint on it. The top rail I would probably pre-drill a new hole and put a decking screw in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are those trees always touching it? Wood movement is going to come with the territory if tree leaves are holding onto it I'd think.

I'd absolutely be using deck screws like these.

Curtis
Thanks Curtis, but I did use Deck Screws and they broke. I’m going to use #12 wood screws next. This is why I was considering some kind of 'super weatherproof' glue. :smile:

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Actually now that I’m thinking about it, Maybe I can use 3/8” lag bolts
 

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If the screws broke it sounds like a lot of stress in the joint.

Can you use a bolt and nut? Drill a hole for the nut in the vertical section, square off the top side and then drill into the end grain for the bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If the screws broke it sounds like a lot of stress in the joint.

Can you use a bolt and nut? Drill a hole for the nut in the vertical section, square off the top side and then drill into the end grain for the bolt.
Umm that’s interesting. I don't know why I didn't think of that. :smile:
I have 4 ft x 3/8” all-thread and could run it all the way through the sides. The bottom would not be seen and I could just run it tight up against the bottom piece. I would have to add a piece in the middle with a routed groove to hide the all-thread, but I have to think about the upper horizontal side pieces. That might be a little harder to conceal without rebuilding it. I also have to come up with something to hide the nuts on the front and back.
A glob of strong hardened glue would sure make it easy if it could bond well. :shifty:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'd put a couple of half inch dowels with titebond III in each end. If pegs are good enough for 100 year old bridges it'll do here.
Another good thought, thanks that would make it much easier to conceal the ends.

There is a lot of stress from high winds and I had to fasten it down with 24" Flat Steel Form Stakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok I know what I'm going to do. I'm going to use all-thread on the bottom because that where the most stress and torque is. I'm then going to use the 1/2" dowels in the middle so that I can conceal them and I'm going to use lag screws down from the top.

 

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Whoops, didn't realize it was a deck screw that snapped. Wow!

This does sound like a lot of stress on that joint. I think your plan will work. I'd seriously consider cutting those trees back a tad though and making sure they're not actually connecting with the wood.

Curtis
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
For adhesive, why not take a cue from the boating world and use stuff that stands up in the tough marine environment? Both thickened epoxy and 3M 5200 are tough, waterproof and not too fussy about good fitting joints.
Today I found out that a wood vent cover I made last year completely fell apart that I used some weather proof glue on. I did not use any screws, but I put a couple of coats of primer and then completely coated it with white roof coating. It was covered with snow for about a month and a couple of rains, but I can’t believe it fell apart like it did.
the photo below shows what the original looked like along side the new one. It had nails and i sure wish i would have used screws

I think I’ve given up on glue completely.

Whoops, didn't realize it was a deck screw that snapped. Wow!

This does sound like a lot of stress on that joint. I think your plan will work. I'd seriously consider cutting those trees back a tad though and making sure they're not actually connecting with the wood.

Curtis
The trees aren’t going to be a problem anymore because I’m moving it to a new location. I discovered that raccoons were using it to climb on the roof and I also cut back all the vegetation.
 

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Gorilla glue has a new glue for wood. It dries white and doesn't foam up like the original and is also waterproof.

I saw it yesterday at my local big box store; the blue one.
 
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The wood vent you made, you would have better luck with it if you had used pressure treated plywood. Much of the problems you are having is from a lack of maintenance. Wood expands a lot more on exterior wood and you have to keep it caulked and painted. When a crack develops to where water can seep in it swells more and pulls on the glue joints and fasteners.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
The wood vent you made, you would have better luck with it if you had used pressure treated plywood. Much of the problems you are having is from a lack of maintenance. Wood expands a lot more on exterior wood and you have to keep it caulked and painted. When a crack develops to where water can seep in it swells more and pulls on the glue joints and fasteners.
I have to disagree with you about the lack of maintenance.

The original vent was 30 yrs old with no maintenance whatsoever in all that time. It has withstood 6 ft of snow, extreme sun and rain exposure for all those years. It was only noticed last year when squirrels were entering it. It was poorly made with cheap plywood sides and composite roof shingles spanning 16” without support. The plywood was not sealed, but it did have a very thick amount of White Roof Coating that pretty much held it all together even after the plywood had rotted away.

The new one I built last year would have been still intact if I would have used screws because all the pieces are sound and sealed inside and out with 2 coats of outdoor oil based primer. The glue was the only thing that came apart and had nothing to do with maintenance.
I didn’t have time to take photos of it with the primer because I was on vacation and they were in such a hurry to get it installed they sent someone to my house to pick it up

I did not actually install it and I sent a can of Henry 287 Solarflex White Roof Coating along with it because I did not have a can at the time I built it. If the idiot who I sent to install it had followed my instructions, it might have had a chance without the screws, but I would never do it again without screws.

As far as the Trellis goes, there was no glue except for some decorative pieces on top that came apart after about 8 years and that might not have happened if I had painted it once in a while. There was a lot of force on the top piece because I cut and bent it a little too thick. I would have had to screw a flat piece of steel to keep it intact. The rest of if it was the fact that the deck screws were simply not strong enough and broke which I would not call lack of maintenance. The redwood 2x4 pieces are all still sound.
 
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