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I don't if anybody has seen this, but I thought it was interesting about Gorila glue compaired with yellow glue

 

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I would not waste my time watching that video. Obviously the video maker does not like gorilla glue and went about proving it was no good.

George
 

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Most glues suck at filling gaps. I agree with George- non info!!!
 

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Gorilla glue has it's uses. Worked great to seal a crack in a bird bath.
Of course the next time I wanted to use some, it had all gone off in the bottle. And that was a quart bottle, someone had given me!

Tightbond is my go to glue, and sometimes use Plastic resin glue, or epoxy.

I think Gorilla glue joints have to be tight, with thin glue line, in order to be strong. It hardens to a foam.
 

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Gorilla was the winner for for strength on board flat against board test. His test was right on IMHO. I have seen the pros and cons first hand at my inlaws farm. I have seen it used to glue trim back on the farm truck,a brick on the patio and even glue a leg zipper on my father inlaws overalls. It looks like crap but holds like iron. I don't care for the foamy expansion and no shelf life.
 

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Gorilla Glue responded to the video in the comment section.

Gorilla Glue is not a gap-filling glue - that isn't a claim that we make. Because it is a polyurethane glue, Gorilla Glue expands 3-4 times the application amount into the surfaces to create a superior bond. However, if those surfaces are not tightly fitted together and then clamped, the expanding glue will not create a strong bond - as you saw in the video, the "foam" on its own is not strong enough to hold the pressure when the two surfaces are not tightly fitted. As you saw, Gorilla Glue does perform very well when the surfaces are tightly fitted - in fact, it is stronger than the other glues you tried. In the future, we recommend Gorilla Epoxy for gap filling applications, as it fills voids and bonds uneven and vertical surfaces. We hope this information is helpful! ?
 

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When GG first came out I did a whole bunch of playing around with it. If you thin it a touch with Xzlene it foams much much less.

I wanted to try it for glue lams but wanted it thinner so I spoke to the tech guys and they said that the Xzlene was the only thing they recommended thinning it with but that thinning was not "recommended." It's been yrs and that lam is still solid even after thinning to around 50%.
 
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