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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a project that has been stained and had two top coats applied but it is not quite as dark as I wanted it to be. My reading about glazing suggests that I can now again apply a stain to deepen the color and then follow up with top coats after the glaze stain has dried.

Is it really this simple?

Thanks.

Gary
 

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A glaze is more like paint. It is mostly used to bring out the details of moldings or carvings. You would brush it on and wipe off the excess and the pigment would stick in the crevices. It can also be used in wood graining, antiquing or faux finishes where you put a base color on and apply the glaze over the surface with almost dry brush or a fan brush to make simulated grain or pat it with a sponge to give a burl look or faux look. It's not really intended for what you are doing. Since you don't spray I would recommend something like polyshades. I would be inclined to spray an aniline dye because it's more transparent. You might try mail ordering some toners from Mohawk Finishing Products. They come in spray cans so you wouldn’t have to have a sprayer. It would work much the same as the aniline dye except it’s not quite as transparent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A glaze is more like paint. It is mostly used to bring out the details of moldings or carvings. You would brush it on and wipe off the excess and the pigment would stick in the crevices. It can also be used in wood graining, antiquing or faux finishes where you put a base color on and apply the glaze over the surface with almost dry brush or a fan brush to make simulated grain or pat it with a sponge to give a burl look or faux look. It's not really intended for what you are doing. Since you don't spray I would recommend something like polyshades. I would be inclined to spray an aniline dye because it's more transparent. You might try mail ordering some toners from Mohawk Finishing Products. They come in spray cans so you wouldn’t have to have a sprayer. It would work much the same as the aniline dye except it’s not quite as transparent.
Thanks Steve. Glazing from your explanation is surely not what I am after in this situation. I thought that some of my research indicated that I could simply add a coat of stain between top coats to help darken a piece.

I had seen the Mohawk toners in a spray can and likely will add some of those to my supplies for future situations like this.

Gary
 
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