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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys,

I posted a question on here a few months ago, looking for some tips on building a giant jenga game for my kids. I got some great feedback from the forum, and have built a few games which turned out well. I used a Miter Saw, a stationary belt sander from harbor freight for all of the sanding, and the 2x4's came from Home Depot.

I've since received a bit of interest from friends/family to build a few more, however the process i've been using with the tools mentioned is pretty time consuming. The belt sander takes up the most time to get the wood down to a nice smooth finish.

What would you guys recommend I do to make these games faster?

Thanks!
 

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How about some photos?! I would square up the 2x4s on a jointer and the table saw. Then likely ease the edges on a router. I would probably work with the lumber in 4' sections and then use a stop block at the miter saw to cut everything to uniform size at the end.
 

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My son and I actually made a few sets and sold them on E-Bay a couple years back.
We used 2x6's , 3 rips on the table saw would yield 2 pieces per width .
Jointer for 2 sides then the other 2 sides on the planer.
Crosscut them on the miter to length then dust the surfaces and break the edges on the stationery sander.
Finish size was 1.375 x 2.45 x 9.45
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the feedback.

I dont yet have a router or planer. I understand what a planer does but have not used one before. Would the planer get the surface of the wood smooth enough where i wouldnt need to hit it with the stationary belt sander?
 

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Yes, the planer will get it as smooth as good store bought wood---only fine finish sanding might be needed.

A router mounted in a home made table---fixed with a round over bit--and you are ready to play.
 

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So, I made a giant Jenga set a few years back. Planed, jointed...every piece was perfect. Too perfect, in fact. We set it up and began playing, and we discovered that the pieces all fit together so well that when you tried to pull one out, it created a vacuum and pulled other pieces with it. It ended up being impossible to play without roughing it up a little. Who'd have thought?
 
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