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I have been woodworking for a few years now. Mostly working with furniture building, dovetailing, m & t, and various kids of joinery. I have always considered turning to be en entire differing universe requiring completely different tools and set up. However, recently I have been wondering if I have exaggerated this in my own mind. My question is whats the estimated need to get started in turning. I would mostly be making furniture legs and the sort. I don't see myself hollowing out pieces at least to start with. I would obviously need a lathe, but what kind of a tool collection would I need to get started?

I am aware of the absurdity of the question and the potential argument that might ensue, just figured it was the best place to start.
 

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There's the lathe. Then you'll need turning tools. Spindle gouges, roughing gouge, skew, parting tool. Then you need way to hold the wood, which fortunately for spindle turning us not that complicated. You'll need a grinder and a jig for sharpening. You'll need face protection. But once you get turning, you'll almost surely start wanting to do bowls/vessels. Then you'll need bowl gouges and maybe some scrapers. And a chuck ( or 3).

Welcome to the vortex ;-)
 

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+1 with Sawdustfactory.

Also look back at earlier threads. A number of threads where folks ask about starting out. One example.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f6/where-start-53053/

When I purchased my lathe I realised it was the most I had spent on a tool, which I could not use without spending more money.

My table saw was more expensive, but at least I could plug this in and use it.

With a lathe, the tools and accessories add up to a lot more than most folks starting out appreciate.

I recall my wood turning friend mentioning about turning tools being expensive, "$40 each". I said I had not paid so little for one at that time.

You can get away with turning between centres for spindle work, but a scroll chuck can be very handy for the times when even with a spindle project, you need to have one end held in the lathe whilst having access to turn the other end without the tailstock interfering.

Edit, added link for face shield.

The one item you should not skimp on is a decent face shield. Look at NCPaladin's post #14 in this thread. Turns out my Lee Valley faceshield had the higher rating stamp.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f6/faceshields-46857/
 
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