Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
General International 50-220 buying advice

I got the model number backwards on the main thread topic. Could a mod fix that by any chance? Should be 50-220. Thanks!
---

Hi. I'm new and this is my first post - please forgive me for skipping an introductory post and diving right into a question. (I can introduce myself later but I'm not that interesting anyway, honestly) :smile:

I have an opportunity to purchase a General International 50-220 hybrid table saw, and all I know about it is what I've found around the web in the last couple hours, which isn't that much.

It was made in 2006, is in excellent condition (so I'm told), has the Canadian version of the Bies fence, and the asking price is $375. From my research it seems that it sold for around $850+ new back in 2005.

This would be my first table saw. I frankly never expected to get anything better than a used contractor saw, but this seems like a pretty good deal. I may well be wrong but my impression is that getting a 4yo hybrid saw in great shape for under $400 is an opportunity that doesn't come around too often.

Should I buy it, and if not why not? If anyone knows anything good or bad about this saw, I'd really appreciate your advice. I've read mostly good stuff so far.

Also, and this might seem funny, but if I do buy it I don't know how I'll get it out of my truck, due to the weight and my complete lack of friends (I'm newish to my city). Even my neighbors aren't really an option. And I'm reluctant to ask my pregnant wife!

So... I'm hoping I could remove the table and take it out in parts: wings, table, cabinet. Even so, can one guy do that? I'm of average strength. I'm not sure how the weight of each piece breaks down. Are there other major pieces I can separate? And is removing the table difficult? I may be getting in over my head here!

Thanks very much for any advice!

Murray
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,445 Posts
From what I know of this saw, $375 is a pretty slick deal. The fence is excellent. The drive system uses a dual stage drive that's said to give more torque. It has reviewed well historically, and gets mainly favorable reports from owners. The Sunhill, Craftex (Canadian), and Woodtek saws use the same basic guts, and were made in the same Taiwanese factory by Geetech...it's the accessories and bolt on stuff that's different. The biggest knock I can recall is that the inserts are difficult to find and not the easiest to make on your own....they should be easier to find by now.

General International is a very reputable company, and that's a nice deal...hard to lose much financially on that deal. Heck, you might even get it for less. The fence alone is worth quite a bit.

It's not hard to remove the fence, and wings. The motor could also come out, but might be bit more of a challenge. The main top should come off too, but will also have the trunnions attached, so that portion will be pretty heavy. If you remove the fence and wings, it should be hard to lay on it's side get it off the truck yourself....you don't need to lift the entire weight yourself. You could always give a strapping teen $10 to help if necessary.

 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
29,921 Posts
knotscott has the tech stuff

I can help with moving. I bought a Craftsman 22124 saw recently from the store, fully assembled and was puzzling over how to get it in my pick up truck with a capper.
I decides as the 5 store employees were watching that it would ride best inverted with the weight of the table on a piece of cardboard on the bed.
Turning it over is easy because of all the surfaces and grip points. The cardboard acted as a slippery skid plate so once an edge got on the tail gate (we) could just dead lift it into the bed and push it forwared.
Your problem will be the reverse, it will want to come sliding down/out pretty fast. I recommend parking in a gully or backing up to a stack of blocks or pile of dirt to raise the distance it needs to drop. A ramp of 3/4" plywood will help, but caution the foot of the ramp will want to slide backwards, dropping everything to the ground.
I don't recommend doing this by yourself.
If you are ingenious and cautious it's possible using ropes and other stopping methods...cleats on the ramp ETC. An engine hoist borrowed or rented would make this a whole lot easier.

I know this from experience of moving heavy things all my life, usually alone. Now I have a 15 yr old son who is stronger than I am, but not as savvy. I use chainfalls and tractors with forks lately, much easier. Another thought would be to use a trailer, since the bed is considerably lower both to get it up on and then to lower it. A hand truck or dolly will be useful rather than lifting it and carrying it. :thumbsup: bill
 
  • Like
Reactions: murray

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both for the info and the great suggestions, some of which I'll definitely use.

I think the only negatives I've heard about it are: horrible user manual, all metric measurements, difficult to make custom inserts. I think I also read that the motor isn't standard so it can't be replaced easily. None of those concern me too much, though difficulty in replacing parts could be a hassle.

Is there anything you can tell me that I should check when I inspect it before deciding to buy? I have no experience here. Should I take a straight edge to check table flatness?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,445 Posts
Table flatness is worth checking, but depending on where it's located and in what direction, it'd typically take a really big deviation to goof up the cuts....it's just not something I get too anal about. The wings are easily shimmed level with the table.

The overall condition is a good indicator of how it was cared for. Most things are adjustable and/or fairly easily replaceable (except for the motor as your noted, but it could easily be rebuilt) Run it and listen for smooth operation...it shouldn't make any grinding or screaching noises. Don't worry if the fence doesn't slide smoothly or isnt' square, it can be waxed and adjusted. It's nice if the hand wheels move smoothly, but those are easily cleaned and waxed if they're hard to move. Check the gears underneath for obvious signs of gauling, cracks, or chips. Check the belt for wear, and check it for any other obvious issues. Good alignment and blade selection are the keys to good performance. The manual might be online now.

This sounds like a nice deal to me, and it likely won't hang around very long....is it even still available?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for that advice. I was concerned it would be snapped up, but I've been in contact with the seller and it's still available. I'd have looked at it over the weekend, but it's an hour drive away, and I don't want to make multiple trips. I think I'm going to pull the trigger though, if nobody beats me to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
I can help with moving. I bought a Craftsman 22124 saw recently from the store, fully assembled and was puzzling over how to get it in my pick up truck with a capper.
Reading your account of moving your 22124, reminds me of my recent purchase of Craftsman 221140 fully assembled, and loading the beast into my Ranger pickup. The former owner of the saw, his driveway sloped down toward his house and where we had to load the saw the height of the ground to the tailgate added at least 10" due to the odd slope. Plus my Ranger has extra rise like a 4x4. So how does an old overweight guy pushing 60 (me), and young 30s guy load it. Fortunately looking in his shed I found 2 2x6x8 or 10'. We put on top of each other and the young guy and I walked the saw up. With me on the bottom, and the young former guy on top side we would lift and move about 12" at a time. The weight of the saw when set down dug into the wood and didn't slide down plus me holding it in place. It went pretty smooth, a lot could have easily gone wrong, and one of us seriously hurt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Is that the one that was for sale down in Salem, OR? I was going to snag it but decided I couldn't afford to put out the cash right now. Looked like a great saw.
Yep. I was all ready to go pick it up, and the seller told me it was sold. I'm so bummed... that was a sweet deal, and a pretty rare one I suspect.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top