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To me it looks like spots where linseed oil in the stain prevented the finish from adhering. Sometimes that happens if the stain was not allowed enough drying time before the finish was applied, especially if it was lacquer.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Damnit Steve, I knew you were gonna say that... Well not necessarily YOU, but someone. Your exactly right. Thats what I suspected, but I hoped that was just my "expecting the worst" attitude. This blows, I dont know if this thing can handle another stripping!! After the week or so it took to strip it, I BLO'd it, let dry for a month, put a good 4 or 5 coats of dewaxed shellac. But then I guess I sanded through in a few spots. One day I hope to not suck quite this bad. Heres a pic of what it looked like before the sanding of the shellac, i thought i was on my way. So now I ask you, will I lose some of that deep color in the wood by stripping again? If so, is there a dye/type of dye that will help bring it back? That stripper stuff is just so intense, I cant see it not just eating away at the wood.
 

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OK your saying the finish is shellac? If you wait a couple weeks for the linseed oil to cure under the finish you should be able to soak the finish with alcohol and re-wet the finish where it would bond to the wood. You would have to soak it enough to completely liquidify the finish again. Then you could procede with the finish then. There wouldn't be a need to strip it. If it was lacquer you could soak it with lacquer thinner. If it was polyurethane than stripper would be needed.

As far as dyes I use NGR stains from Mohawk Finishing Products. The stain is available in powder form you can mix with alcohol yourself. There is also Transtint dyes which I haven't used but sound like a better product to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
no , theres the gen. fin. high performance on top of the shellac. In that 3rd pic i put up it was just shellac'd, I was just showing the color. So I guess stripping it is. Thanks a ton Steve.
 

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Hey steve, I was curious... What if I were to apply a couple coats of dewaxed shellac over the BLO, and then a coat of the amber regular shellac, then another coat or 2 of the dewaxed, then the WB poly...? Sounds a little nutty, I know, but I was wondering if the amber tinted shellac might add a little subtle depth to the mohogany??? I kinda opted away from using any dyes, Ive never used them before and I dont really wanna start practicing on such a big project. anyway, then of course id have to cover that with the seal coat to apply the poly. Cause WB poly shouldnt go over waxed shellac correct? Trust me, if it werent a desk top, id skip the poly all together. Just a thought...
 

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When you apply shellac to shellac, the following coats dissolves and blends with the previous coat. Since that's the case, it doesn't work very well to apply dewaxed over waxy shellac and not have the 2 mix, possibly bringing some of the wax to the surface. The waterbornes might have problems adhering to this...though I have read some folks swear it's not a problem the GF product. Maybe that one doesn't have any urethane resins iin it, that's what usually causes the adhesion problems.
 

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Hey steve, I was curious... What if I were to apply a couple coats of dewaxed shellac over the BLO, and then a coat of the amber regular shellac, then another coat or 2 of the dewaxed, then the WB poly...? Sounds a little nutty, I know, but I was wondering if the amber tinted shellac might add a little subtle depth to the mohogany??? I kinda opted away from using any dyes, Ive never used them before and I dont really wanna start practicing on such a big project. anyway, then of course id have to cover that with the seal coat to apply the poly. Cause WB poly shouldnt go over waxed shellac correct? Trust me, if it werent a desk top, id skip the poly all together. Just a thought...
What you have planned is to put 4 or 5 coats of shellac and then start putting poly on it. I think that's too many coats. I think you would be better off with one coat of amber,one coat of sealcoat and 2 or 3 coats of water based poly. The amber kind of has a cloudy appearance to it so it would be best to put it on first instead of putting clear under it.

You are correct in that you shouldn't put either water based or oil based polyurethane over standard shellac because of the wax content. The sealcoat is shellac that has had the wax filtered out.
 
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