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Discussion Starter #21
For the open spans, I would guess prefabricated trusses are required instead of building rafters.

I think if you finish the pole barn on the inside and with the same materials on the outside, it becomes about the same costs as the conventional framing. If you do not finish a pole barn on the inside, then it becomes the less expensive option.

I wonder if I could just use a monolithic slab for the foundation of the walls instead of a separate foundation and then slab.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I have only built in extreme climates.

If there is any danger of frost movement, I would deffinetly have footers and walls.

If no frost, you can trench and pour a slab.
I would go with a normal footer where I live.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I am looking at a 30 x 50 building with a hip roof to match the house, so I think trusses would be better.

Mark
 

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Scotty D
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I am looking at a 30 x 50 building with a hip roof to match the house, so I think trusses would be better.

Mark
I "HATE" prefab trusses!

I Have landed 1000's of them.

You would be much better off building your own.

That being said...You could buy prefab for less then it would cost you to have me stick build your roof.

Realize....You wont get the straight lines.........But it will keep the rain out.



Look at any prefab trussed roof... and if you can live with that...go truss.
 

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Has anyone used pole construction for their garage/workshop? I am curious how well you guys like it versus traditional framing.

Also, is there a need to keep a shop heated or cooled when not occupied to protect cast iron tops? I would have heating in it for when it is occupied.

I don't plan to put water in the building so I don't have keep it heated. I would just keep a gallon of water for the few times I might want to use my bench grider.

I am just looking for recommendations for when I decide to build, or have build, the garage/workshop.

How are you guys doing electrical hookups? I was thinking of a 200 amp breaker box with several 220 volt circuits that would be dedicated to certain equipment. I would use 10 gauge wire on all of them, so that any could be converted to 30 amps if needed later on by just changing the breaker and the outlet. I would have 110 V 20 amp outlets around the building.

I am looking at a 30x36 building. The garage part would only be housing our tractor and a low profile trailer. The rest of the building would be workshop.

Comments?

Mark
Mark,
There is nothing wrong with a wood shop built with poles, they are just as sturdy and you can finish them off on the exterior as you would any other shop. Just a suggestion, you may consider a gambrel instead of a hip type roof, it will give you additional storage above for not much more cost. You can build the trusses yourself. The interior walls can be studded 2ft OC to eleminate exposed poles, this will also enable you to run wiring and also insulate the structure. You can also extend off of one side 10 feet or so with a shed roof, i did this to my old wood shop, the shed roof makes a nice place to roll a project under to do sanding. My old shop was located in southeastern Ohio so it had to be insulated. Just my opinion.
 

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Bingo! I got the idea of what to build now!

.

Depending on what is the best cost method, I might replace the internal roll up door with a double entry door. I tend to think the rollup door might be more costs effective. I don't believe I will put an entry door from the workshop to the garage since the rollup door can be used for entry.


Mark
I think you may find you will be going from one side of your building to the other more frequently than you think. The roll up door will be great for moving larger stuff back and forth, but it could be a pita for just going back and forth yourself. I would be inclined to also put in a standard door for that purpose. The double entry door idea would also work.

Gerry
 

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Dean
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Just a comment on rust. I live in a humid climate and had a problem with the TS etc. rusting. When I put my shop to bed I cover all the tops with a piece of thin fiberboard. Solved the rust problem. Don't leave wet sawdust under it.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Just a comment on rust. I live in a humid climate and had a problem with the TS etc. rusting. When I put my shop to bed I cover all the tops with a piece of thin fiberboard. Solved the rust problem. Don't leave wet sawdust under it.
I don't have a rust problem with my current TS in our attached garage. The shop will have better heating and cooling than my current garage.

I have also heard of people putting cloth sheets over their tools even when waxed.
 

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Good afternoon. I have a 30x65 shop and love it. It was built by Cleary Buildings (I believe they are national) and I couldn't be happier. They know what they are doing. I built it a little longer so I could have a 20x10 spray both at the far end with an exhaust fan...love it. Heat the thing! I live in Nebraska and we only have ten decent days a year, the rest of the year it is too cold, too hot, too windy etc. If you plan on using any glue you are going to need to keep it from freezing. I also have a restroom with hot/cold water sink..love it. I keep the heat at 40 (as low as the thermostat will go) and I have no problems. I used 1/2 inch osb (fiber board, oxboard) for my interior walls over the insulation instead of drywall. That way you can put anything on the wall anywhere you want and not have any problems finding a stud. I priced out the cost from my local lumber supply center and it only cost me about $1,000 more to have Cleary do it in 2-1/2 days and they really know what they are doing. I buiilt a new house three years ago and the shop went up first so I could build all the cabinets and make the moulding for the house; I'm retireing in a couple years and I can't wait to use that place even more. You can't make it too big, or have enough clamps or too big a dust collection system.

Bandman
 

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Discussion Starter #34
You can't make it too big, or have enough clamps or too big a dust collection system.
It is only too big if it knocks SHMBO out of room on that land for a garden.

I do plan to heat it. I won't have water though due to having to put in a septic tank. The house septic system is probably 500 feet from where the shop would go. I was going to do my walls with OSB too for the same reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Based on my findings and recommendations by others in this thread, I have the following companies I will contact to get quotes and compare them to building it myself the conventional way:

Lester Buildings
Blitzbuilders
Morton Buildings
Hansen Pole Buildings
FetterVille Sales
Barn Pros
Cleary Building Corp

I will also contact my excavator, concrete companies (one owned by a friend and the other managed by a friend), framer, electrician friend and roofing friend to see how it compares with me being the general contractor.

Through it all, the winner will be bases on the best product and best price, so the lowest price doesn't necessarily win.

Mark
 

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Conventional-Pole Hybrid shop-barn

I combined elements of conventional framing and pole construction for my shop/barn/storage building.

The shop part is conventionally framed on a regular concrete foundation using 2 x 6 wall framing. The floor is an isolated and insulated slab which doubles as a thermal mass and helps keep the temperature even. It's 24' x 40' and has it's own bathroom and 200 amp panel. The walls and ceiling are well insulate and sheet-rocked. I heat it with a 4500 watt 220v ceiling mounted forced air heater and a small baseboard in the bathroom. It's very energy efficient. I built the insulated big door and opens 4', 8' or 12' by 8' high. The shop cieling is 10 feet.

I used "attic" trusses to create a huge loft the runs the entire 64' length of the building and 12' wide with a separate stair access. This space is unfinished and uninsulated but makes a great storage area for my wood and excess junk. I put doors on one end with a beam that extends out and will eventually have a small gantry crane hoist attached to it.

The rest of the building is "pole" construction using 6 x 6 treated poles with 2 x 6 Girts running horizontally with metal panels screwed to them. I did set the poles on concrete pilasters with footings. The covered storage for farm equipment is 12' x 40' and the barn area is 36 x 24 and will eventually have a tack room and two stalls, hay storage and room for one vehicle.

This building works great and is truley a dream come true for us.

Bret
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Thanks to everyone with all the ideas. Now I can do detail planning of where exactly to put it and figure the best dimensions to fit my needs and the area where I will build it. Since being unemployed for 15 months (very soon to end :smile:), it will be a while before I actually build. By the time I build, I will have every detail determined right down to the Duct Collection piping and power outlets. I really hope to start building it by summer 2011. I will post a new thread when I start building it and post pictures like Smitty1967 did on his workshop. In a lot of ways, I feel as if I am experiencing the same thing as Smitty 1967 in that I work from a lot of bench tools and am working toward my workshop and filling it with all new machines.
The time is nearing and I am possibly on schedule to start building it by summer 2011. I believe we will stick build it and I am looking at bricking it to match the house if it is not much more than vinyl siding. Looking to make it around 900 square feet and will insulate under the concrete floor. The perfect place to set it is just screaming for a building. Planning on making it deeper than wide rather than making it a perfect square. Maybe 24 x 36 (or 40). After it is built, I will have a Unisaw in it and my current tools, but will need to save up for the rest of the floor model power tools.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Brick may be a lil' more than vinyl...:smile:

That is for sure! It is worth pricing though. I am wondering which of the following will be the most economical:

1. Brick or vinyl siding building with hip roof.

2. Same size building with gambel roof made to look like a barn, which would also fit since we are in the country.

I am having both priced, so I will have the answer.

It will be a couple of months before we could build due to the wet season. The location where it is going needs some drainage work done to protect the building and that can't really take place until the area is dry due to the fact you can sink in the mud. :eek:

I will start a thread with pictures if / when we start building. It is a dream I have had for 15 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Brick is about 1.75 times more than vinyl according to the contractor. By my calculations, it would add maybe $4500 to the overall costs based on 4 solid walls, which isn't the case due to windows and doors.
 
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