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Discussion Starter · #61 · (Edited)
I completed most of the cart on Saturday. It turned out pretty well. And although I drilled ahead of all of my screws, I had one small split when screwing parallel to the grain. That was due to a weak spot in the wood next to a knot, so I resolved it by drilling and putting a screw perpendicular to the split.

I cut down two of my spare 8 foot 2x4s leftover from when I made sliders to help move large containers up/down stairs. These had a few steel plate claw marks and nail/screw holes, but generally in decent shape...

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My spare 6' piece of plywood was next, leftover from extra garage shelving that I took apart years ago. My fence was too high for the circular saw, so I just used a long straight edge...

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Cuts were acceptable for that miter saw with an old blade and circular saw with an old blade that had low tooth count. Very mild burning at the grain, but not too much. I'll be sanding the edges of everything any ways...

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For the screws to attach each 2x4, I used up various random types/sizes from my spare and recycled parts. It's quite a hodgepodge of different threads, alloys, etc...

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When I mounted the plywood, I had to dig into one my assortments of new screws. Cheaper zinc plated was fine for this...

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I over-countersunk all of the screws that were entered from the bottom, as I'll be filling those holes with wood filler. I don't want any exposed metal of various, unknown alloys exposed. The cart will be a permanent structure, and the plywood shelf is the only easily replaced component.

All assembled, aside from the casters and levelers, and with the legs positioned...

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The casters came we really cheap screws that I wouldn't trust to hold up over time. I stripped the heads of two out of three with my driver, and that was after pre-drilling screw holes in soft wood. It was so bad that I had to back out the screws with a pair of vice grip pliers. So I'll need to go buy some quality stainless steel screws to replace them. But here's what they'll look like at each corner (and yes the caster clears the leveler when spun around 360 degrees):

Wood Machine tool Workbench Hardwood Machine




I'll be cutting down the edges of the outside 2x4s to match the leg angle, probably with a jig saw. Then I'll hand plane and sand the rest of it.

Once that's all done, do you think I should stain/seal or paint it?
 

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Looks nice!

I don't think I've read all the posts in this thread, so hopefully I'm not repeating something.

Those Craftsman legs/stands really twisted and bounced around when they were raised up with the casters Sears sold. It made it tough to move the tool around even on a fairly smooth floor (the same basic stands were sold for RASs, jointers, etc.). The good side was the rubber feet that touched the floor when the wheels were retracted held the legs pretty steady when you were working. We tied all of the legs together with 1x3s about 8" up from the bottom which made moving the tools much easier. I think it also improved the strength of the legs when they were down on the rubber feet. I don't think you will have a problem with your design, but you might want to think about removing the rubber feet/bolt if you haven't already (I can't tell from the pictures) and bolt the bottom of the legs to your cart.

You probably thought of this: your cart is going to fill up with saw dust. When we first added the supports to ours, we also had a plywood bottom. We thought it would be a good place to store things (miter gauge, wrenches, etc.). We never though of the saw dust coming down from the saw. Eventually we removed it and just left the 1x3s between the legs. I guess it was a matter of whether or not we wanted the saw dust on the floor or the "shelf" and we picked the floor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Looks nice!
Thanks. :)

I don't think I've read all the posts in this thread, so hopefully I'm not repeating something.

Those Craftsman legs/stands really twisted and bounced around when they were raised up with the casters Sears sold. It made it tough to move the tool around even on a fairly smooth floor (the same basic stands were sold for RASs, jointers, etc.). The good side was the rubber feet that touched the floor when the wheels were retracted held the legs pretty steady when you were working. We tied all of the legs together with 1x3s about 8" up from the bottom which made moving the tools much easier. I think it also improved the strength of the legs when they were down on the rubber feet. I don't think you will have a problem with your design, but you might want to think about removing the rubber feet/bolt if you haven't already (I can't tell from the pictures) and bolt the bottom of the legs to your cart.
Yup, they're gone. The seller only had three of them anyways, and I wasn't interested in trying to track down a set of them online since I wanted it mounted on a cart. Also, I have to use those holes to mount the legs to the stand with one bolt in each leg/corner.

You probably thought of this: your cart is going to fill up with saw dust. When we first added the supports to ours, we also had a plywood bottom. We thought it would be a good place to store things (miter gauge, wrenches, etc.). We never though of the saw dust coming down from the saw. Eventually we removed it and just left the 1x3s between the legs. I guess it was a matter of whether or not we wanted the saw dust on the floor or the "shelf" and we picked the floor.
Indeed, that's part of the plan. I expect to use that cart as both sawdust collection and a place to throw cut off scraps. :)

I originally explored the idea of sawdust collection, but sadly for this model the only feasible way would be to seal off the cabinet and add a port to attach to a shop vacuum. And that leaves the parts inside susceptible to saw dust build up over time. So I decided to leave it in its original, open configuration, and just use an air compressor to clean it out once in a while.
 

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So I decided to leave it in its original, open configuration, and just use an air compressor to clean it out once in a while.
Pretty much what I do. I saw a picture years ago where the person put plywood partly up the legs to make it like a bin to catch as much sawdust as possible. He had a door he would open to suck out the sawdust with a shop vac.
 

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Once that's all done, do you think I should stain/seal or paint it?
I leave my shop projects bare wood, hasn't been a problem in my garage-shop that is big temp and humidity changes.

And [email protected], when I looked at your CAD plans I thought you were replacing the saw's legs, that's why I asked if you were using 2x2s for them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
I leave my shop projects bare wood, hasn't been a problem in my garage-shop that is big temp and humidity changes.
Thanks. Yeah, my current workbench and shelving is just bare wood in the garage. It was built by the previous owner of my house, so I'd guess that it's about a decade old and still fine. I did modify it quite a bit over the years. It makes a big difference having a finished, attached garage. Even if it's not temperature/humidity controlled, it still gets protected from big temperature swings since it's attached.

I'm leaning to just stain and finish since that will give it a bit of protection. And I'm a little reluctant to paint soft wood since any ding or chip will look bad. Yet I'm still open to suggestions.

And [email protected], when I looked at your CAD plans I thought you were replacing the saw's legs, that's why I asked if you were using 2x2s for them.
Haha! No worries, I was wondering why you mentioned that. Now it makes sense. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
I'm was able to get back to these projects a little last weekend. They have been put on delay for a while thanks to other weekend work.

In getting some of my dad's old tools out of storage bins to do the power sanding, I have two orbital sanders (not sure why he had two?) and one detail sander for corners...
Bag Personal protective equipment Glove Luggage and bags Electric blue





I hand planed the top a bit to line up joins, then sanded everything. It looks like the miter saw did not burn the wood, as sanding did not remove it. It's just the grain in this wood is very dark...
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I opted to stain instead of paint it. I used some leftover Minwax oil-based Provincial stain to apply a few coats for its darkest effect. I wanted it dark so that I can easily see sawdust...
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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
Over the past couple of weekends I had a little time here and there to work on the table saw. One of the last steps before reassembling it was to clean and polish most of the little hardware parts, including the bolts, washers, spacers, and lift & tilt screws. And do that quickly, I needed to get my Dad's old Delta 8" bench-top grinder cleaned up and working well. I also bought a few wire brush and polishing wheels.

Condition of the grinder right out of storage with many years of dust, dirt, and cigarette smoke (my Mother smoked in the garage)...

Automotive tire Automotive design Shelf Gas Engineering


It seems to be a ~2001 or later model...

Product Automotive tire Kitchen utensil Gas Audio equipment




I might add a dimmer knob to it later so that I can control the speed. The grinder states 120 volts at 3.0 amps, so it should draw 360 watts (120V x 3A). I can get a simple light dimmer that's rated for 600W which should be good even for spike wattage right when you power it on. If I move the power switch and make my own plate for the controls, I should have enough room inside the base for both. But that's a future project.

In the process of cleaning this grinder, I had to take off the safety covers. And to do that I needed to remove both flanges, but the problem is that the inside flanges have a groove where they rest and can't easily be pulled off the auger. I'm not sure if those groves are from wear and tear or by design. Either way, I had to use one of my gear pullers to remove it. I wasn't worried about bending it since it only needed a little bit of force...

Saw Abrasive saw Automotive tire Mitre saws Concrete saw




Removing the base revealed what looks like a repair job done on it in the past. Note the orange wire nut which isn't standard. And the wires have been vibrating again the base plate, making wear marks...

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The rubber feet aren't too bad, but still I soaked the feet in ArmorAll to keep them from cracking or drying out more...

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Base of the grinder all cleaned up, so now on to the lamp...

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I noticed that the plastic wire loom on the lamp is nasty, even after cleaning. It was caked with cigarette smoke, so I'm replacing it with a nice silver-gray braid that should fit...

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It's a tight fit, but I did get it installed, and will melt the ends to keep it from fraying...

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Bulb socket for the lamp is rated for 40W, but that's 40W of electricity and heat from an incandescent bulb. I'm putting in a 6W or 12W LED bulb later...

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Putting the lamp back together, and redoing the wiring connections...

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(continued...)
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 · (Edited)
Since this grinder can generate a lot of vibrations, I'm wrapping the connections in weather stripping. That should also help keep the wires from resting on the base directly. I placed a piece of flat sticky foam on the bottom plate as well, from 9x6" sheets I cut to size (not shown)...

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Grinder is running and lamp is working well with a 6 watt LED bulb...

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I think the silver-gray braid looks better than the original black plastic loom...

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Grinder is now thoroughly cleaned and reassembled with a wire brush and polishing wheel. I would normally use a polish wheel spindle, but that Amazon order hasn't arrived yet. Fortunately if I keep the flanges tight enough and don't apply too much pressure while polishing, the wheel doesn't slip.

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-----------------> Back to the table saw restoration! :D

Wire brush work on the tilt screw to take off the metal on the surface that oxidized from its vinegar bath...

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I then polished all of the larger hardware parts, including all of the bolts. I used a fairly course polish compound stick (it's a reddish-brown color), as I'm doing this for functionality more than anything else. It was messy, so I performed this at the edge of my garage for easy cleanup. The wheel and grinder after a lot of polishing work...

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These polished parts came out pretty good and should be a little more resistant to rust and corrosion now. The long, skinny motor mount bolt on the left will need to go back to wire-brushing again since it has some pitting, but others fared well. I didn't take a photo of all of the hardware, just a sampling to show the difference...

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Final comparison of the lift screw through the stages of restoration...

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Wow - I don't think I've ever seen anyone go that far in restoring or cleaning up a bench motor like that.
Well done young feller, well done indeed. All of your projects are coming alone quite nicely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 · (Edited)
It's been a couple months since I've been able to work on these projects, let alone update here. Life's priorities have a way of trumping our hobbies. ;) Sorry it took so long to update this thread.

A month ago I completed the cart's assembly of the retractable casters and leveling feet. And then last weekend I disassembled the table saw's steel legs/base in preparation to clean and paint. I'll include more photos of the cart later, but for now I'll share my painting of the legs/base.

I matched the paint color with the help of a Napa store in the next town, as my local Napa didn't paint match. They matched the paint very well and filled up two spray cans for me, along with some extra in small cans to touchup any scratches with a brush in the future. It turned out pretty well for a rattle can paint job!

The original model and serial number tag was mounted rather haphazardly. Since I was repainting, I decided now's the time to remove it and then mount it properly after it's painted...

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I expected it to be more difficult to remove, but it came off fairly well with no creases or damage to the foil label:

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Model/serial label area prepped:

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Hood Output device Peripheral Table Automotive design




Only the table legs had some areas of rust, which I treated with scouring/finishing pads and WD40. But the rest of the surface that was rust free I deep cleaned with scouring/finishing pads and window cleaner, which only took up a little bit of gray from the painted surfaces. That prepped it really well. Suds from scouring the surface:

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Rectangle Wood Floor Flooring Wall





I left the large Sears/Craftsman metal label in place and just taped it up before painting. I also removed the angle guide:

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My paint-matched supplies...

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Parts ready for painting...

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The painting is done!...

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Time to remove the painter's masking tape...

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The base pieces and legs turned out really well too!

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Now I can start reassembling my refurbished table saw. I should have a lot of free time during my two weeks off from work around Christmas. :)
 

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@cipher
based on the tag it is 1990s machine. printing is dots. it is not the blue gray of the old years. late 60s to mid 90s
from my own travels. from the tag it is 93 for a while the next 3 number was the day number.
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still it makes a good looking saw

good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
@cipher
based on the tag it is 1990s machine. printing is dots. it is not the blue gray of the old years. late 60s to mid 90s
from my own travels. from the tag it is 93 for a while the next 3 number was the day number.
View attachment 445191

still it makes a good looking saw

good luck
@Biotec, thanks for confirming that. From the looks of the saw, I did think it was a 93, but wasn't 100% positive. Now you've confirmed that for me. Looks like it was built on January 20th of 1993 if those are indeed days into the year?
 

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also the older blue gray was from Krylon Industrial Tough Coat 03290 Machinery Blue Gray Gloss Acrylic Enamel Paint - 16 oz Aerosol Can - 12 oz Net Weight - 90329 can NOT be found.
the color was dead on. at least to my old eyes.

can you share the paint number that Nappa used
 
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