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I don't have a working lathe right now, but I have a friend & neighbor who's getting one. However, It does have a groove already for the retaining clip. Are you saying that moving the flange will ruin that groove?
I don't want to answer for @Biotec but here's what I think he is saying. I'm looking forward to his answer based on his experience.

I think he is saying that the groove the retaining clip goes into could have been damaged. That could cause the clip to not stay in, and pop out. When you put pressure on the clip in the direction of the curved edge, the clip wants to pop off. I've seen this fixed by the groove being machined to accept a thicker clip or to use two clips (each method assumes there is enough room to do this).

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
I don't want to answer for @Biotec but here's what I think he is saying. I'm looking forward to his answer based on his experience.

I think he is saying that the groove the retaining clip goes into could have been damaged. That could cause the clip to not stay in, and pop out. When you put pressure on the clip in the direction of the curved edge, the clip wants to pop off. I've seen this fixed by the groove being machined to accept a thicker clip or to use two clips (each method assumes there is enough room to do this).

View attachment 440870
Thank you, makes sense. I will double check with a scope after I move the flange. If it's rounded on the sides, I can get my friend's help to make it square again and add a retaining clip to match the new size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
SUCCESS!

I started the weekend a little early this evening with my work on this. I was able to move the flange back into place with a 6" gear puller. The 3 arms gripped the smaller portion of the flange just fine, so no need for a separate giant nut or washer.

Bicycle Bicycle tire Bicycle handlebar Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Tire




Stupid me however didn't think to put anything between the gear puller point and the shaft, so now I have a little dimple in it. Oh well, it's not a big deal since I had it centered:

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I now have all of the parts of the arbor ready to reassemble, including the cast iron pulleys and new bearings. Only question is which retaining ring goes on which side? There's two different sizes, and I can't remember where each goes. The manual doesn't distinguish where the smaller or larger one goes. The E-clip goes in the middle, where there's a deeper groove, and then both retaining rings go to the left of the bearings in this photo:

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Any ways, at least the one retaining ring groove in which I had to move the flange over is still good. It has sharp edges to hold the clip, so no need to re-tool that.

I completed soaking the rest of the hardware with vinegar to remove rust and corrosion. I had to leave it there for a few days. I took out the last batch, wiped everything down, and have the smaller parts soaking in WD40 now:

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Question: what's the easiest way to clean the old grease off of the threads on these height and tilt adjustment bolts? Then what's the easiest way to clean off any rust from those same threads?

Almost everything in these old table saws is metal. That's awesome. The only plastic/rubber parts for the table saw (aside from what's required for the motor, switch and wiring) are the adjustment wheels, table "EXACT-I-CUT" insert, a nylon washer, and two rubber seals:

Automotive tire Wood Audio equipment Font Material property




So I'll be painting the arbor housing, saw cradle, and bottom of table this weekend. In the mean time, the other supplies I purchase for this table saw...

Push Block and Raise/Lower Casters for the base I'll make:

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New link-style V-belt and new combination blade:

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NICE WORK! I use the same 50 tooth Diablo on my saw. You'll like it.
You might try a diamond finger nail file from a drug store to clean up the grooves for the E clips.
Nothing else I know will be thin enough other then a Dremel disc.
 
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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
NICE WORK! I use the same 50 tooth Diablo on my saw. You'll like it.
You might try a diamond finger nail file from a drug store to clean up the grooves for the E clips.
Nothing else I know will be thin enough other then a Dremel disc.
Thanks! And good advice, I might try my Dremel or Rotozip with a polishing disk to clean up the retaining clip grooves.

Also, my vinegar bath did a great job at removing rust and corrosion. But it also did a great job at dulling the steel, lol. So I polished the two big adjustment shafts. Here's one as an example:

Office supplies Writing implement Pen Ball pen Stationery



Original, post vinegar bath, and polished below. I could polish it all the way to the original stainless steel look, but that's just too much work for a part I'll probably never see again.

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
This is the most in depth restoration I've ever followed btw
Thanks! :) It motivates me to take my time and do it well. I'll keep sharing my progress.

I used a wire wheel on my bench grinder to clean up the threads on the tilt and depth screws.
Good advice, thanks! I have an old bench grinder (one of my father's tools, I think it's a Delta, not sure), but it's in one of my storage bins. I might dig it out and then buy a wire brush wheel for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
I completed most of the prepping, masking, priming, and painting today. In the future I still have the wings to paint, but sometime this coming week I need to turn the cradle and arbor housing over to paint the bottom. The paint I used takes 2-4 hours to tack, 5-9 hours to handle it, and 24 hours to cure. It's so long, lol! My self-etching primer only took 30 minutes until I could handle it and paint my color coats.

Before I painted them, I had to prep the cradle and arbor housing since I used mineral oil on them to protect after my wire brushing. So this means I had to strip the oil and clean the surface before I painted. I used Klean Strip Concrete & Metal Prep, which can also remove rust. For rust the recommend full strength and spray or brush on and soak overnight, and for paint prepping they recommend 3:1 water to solution ratio and waiting 15 minutes. I used 1:1 and waited about 20 minutes before washing it off with a hose.

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It worked great. I created the chalky white residue that easily was srcubbed and wire-brushed off to prep the surface. After wire-brushing again:

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I only used two different wire brushes out of my pack of 7 or so different sizes. They certainly got abused during this process...

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Time to mask off all of the flat & polished portions of each part that are used to make contact with another part. For the places that were hard to stick to, such as the arbor housing for the bearings, I used duct tape to mask it.

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I also used duct tape around most of the edges of my table top to make sure it sticks (thought you can't really see it well in the photo). I then cut down two drywall anchors and placed them to mask off the two screws for the 0 and 45 degree stops.

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The self-etching primer I have on hand. I'll be using the Dupli-color cans since one of them is about 1/3 full. I prefer Dupli-Color over Rust-Oleum, but Rust-Oleum is still better than that Krylon crap (sorry to any Krylon fans). Dupli-Color is always my go-to brand for paint when I'm not in a rush to get it, as Home Depot and Lowes don't carry that brand. It's more of an automotive brand.

Liquid Bottle Cosmetics Fluid Automotive tire




My table top has a treatment of rust converter on it, which bonded to the metal, so I didn't need to do any more to prep the surface except to blow it off with my air compressor. The green self-etching primer coats:

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Unfortunately I had no light gray paint on hand, so I had to run to the store to grab some. It's Rust-Oleum Smoke Gray, so a very light gray color:

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The table top is all done, so I removed the masking and duct tape. It looks great. I have just a little over-spray towards the back, in the middle that looks like a rough area in the photo. I'll clean that up after this paint cures (24 hours).

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Thanks! :) It motivates me to take my time and do it well. I'll keep sharing my progress.
The only warning I have is it's really easy to accumulate projects like this, and if you have the space and patience then it's zero issue if you have several lined up.

With my personality, I really value completing furniture or creative projects over restoring tools, and the backlog of tools I needed to locate and restore made the process less enjoyable for me. I was stressed out thinking all the things I "needed to do"

I now just buy most of my tools at whatever price point is within my budget, and I spend more time working things I enjoy and less time cruising flies markets. You may be different, but this was me.
 
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@cipher

I've had three good results using evapo-rust on Cast Iron and Steel parts.

I buy by the gallon and all on use 3-gallons so far in last 4 years. and still have gallon used left.

Naval gel product and others like above do leave whitescale that needs to be cleaned off

after use. they are an acid-base products and must be handled with care.

evapo-rust is environmentally friendly you can get it on your with no side effects.

also does not pit or take good metal away

on cast iron depending on the amount of carbon content in may turn a little bit black.

most of it will rinse off with water and use of a green scrubby we'll get the rest of it off.


gel 8oz . ...........................1 gal reg
amazon $11.00..................$23.00 same price @ homedept
amazon free ship generally next day
 

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@cipher

I personally enjoy rebuilding antique, old equipment. was doing so fairly regularly for others as a side Hobby work up till 2020. in about April brought home my father's radial arm saw (RAS) and the 6 inch jointer planer and 12 inch swing lathe all early 1980 all Craftsman tools.

all have been restored and are running well. later that year I was at an estate sale for some small hand tools and found Craftsman 12in band saw 6 inch large free standing sander, small 3-inch sander, lathe parts that replaced the missing parts for my father's lathe. also a 6 in benchtop grinder.

most of those tools also were from the early 1980s. Replaced all the bearings in all the tools.

after taking the time build all these tools I would not recommend doing this unless, they, the new owner are mechanically inclined and good at doing it. also having a good electrical understanding for some of the power tools is helpful some cases flat-out necessary.

there are some of us who enjoy restoring old tools and using them. there has to be balanced and what you're doing. as another poster had commented he rather do woodworking than buy a tool have to repaired / restore it and then get to use it. I believe another poster had on another thread said he like buying used tools don't care how ratty they look as long as they work well.


I like the appearance to look good and run well.

I believe the original poster ( @cipher ) has gotten past the easy part. the cleanup painting. to prepare to reassemble.
I believe celebration and realignment it will take nearly as long as the teardown and clean up.



sorry about the long trivia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Looks like a good and thorough job on all these parts.
Thanks! :)

The only warning I have is it's really easy to accumulate projects like this, and if you have the space and patience then it's zero issue if you have several lined up.

With my personality, I really value completing furniture or creative projects over restoring tools, and the backlog of tools I needed to locate and restore made the process less enjoyable for me. I was stressed out thinking all the things I "needed to do"

I now just buy most of my tools at whatever price point is within my budget, and I spend more time working things I enjoy and less time cruising flies markets. You may be different, but this was me.
I have a ton of patience... I'm a married guy. ;)

Any ways, I'm more of a hobbyist and DIY person than a woodworking guy, since woodworking is just one of my interests. Still, I'm more handy with wood than I am an engine. So all of my projects bring me some joy, especially when I complete them. From replacing the drain pump in our washing machine to making a nightstand, I enjoy it all.

The wife thinks I'll never finish the table saw, but that's an important component for renovating my garage, so I'm motivated. I'll be holding off on any other projects until the table saw and garage workbenches/shelving is complete.

I've had three good results using evapo-rust on Cast Iron and Steel parts ... evapo-rust is environmentally friendly you can get it on your with no side effects ... also does not pit or take good metal away
Good to know. When I used up my current stuff, I'll keep it in mind.

I personally enjoy rebuilding antique, old equipment. was doing so fairly regularly for others as a side Hobby work up till 2020. in about April brought home my father's radial arm saw (RAS) and the 6 inch jointer planer and 12 inch swing lathe all early 1980 all Craftsman tools.

all have been restored and are running well. later that year I was at an estate sale for some small hand tools and found Craftsman 12in band saw 6 inch large free standing sander, small 3-inch sander, lathe parts that replaced the missing parts for my father's lathe. also a 6 in benchtop grinder.

most of those tools also were from the early 1980s. Replaced all the bearings in all the tools.

after taking the time build all these tools I would not recommend doing this unless, they, the new owner are mechanically inclined and good at doing it. also having a good electrical understanding for some of the power tools is helpful some cases flat-out necessary.

there are some of us who enjoy restoring old tools and using them. there has to be balanced and what you're doing. as another poster had commented he rather do woodworking than buy a tool have to repaired / restore it and then get to use it. I believe another poster had on another thread said he like buying used tools don't care how ratty they look as long as they work well.
I inherited a lot of tools from my Dad after his passing in 2015. I didn't do anything with them for a long time, as I kept them in storage. But now I'm using some of them and will be organizing them and determining what I want to keep or sell.

The most valuable to me was his air compressor, miter saw, circular saw, and grinder. I also received a ton of hand tools, small power tools, and plenty of extra hardware and supplies. The only issue is that he kept them in a garage where my mother smoked for decades. Stuff that was kept in containers/cases was fine, but stuff out in the open got the worst accumulation of smoke.

I cleaned up all his air compressor (2009 model), even the oil-less electric engine, and it's working well. Drained it, treated it, and it holds its max rated pressure just fine. But I need to install a new pressure regulator since it slowly leaks:

Wheel Tire Photograph Vehicle Motor vehicle




I haven't bothered cleaning up his miter saw yet. but it doesn't need much cleaning still it was stored away in a cabinet. I've used it many times so far. Not sure the age, but my guess is late 90s? And don't worry, I don't store it with the cord touching the blade like it's doing in this photo, as it got jostled when moving it for the photo:

Automotive lighting Cookware and bakeware Gas Automotive tire Home appliance




To give you an idea of the smoke damage in the garage where these tools were kept, this was the wall from where she smoked. There was even a hood near it to exhaust the smoke. The first photo is AFTER I cleaned what I could and then patching holes, and the second is when the painting was done. It was a mess, but so much better now, and had to be done to get the place ready to rent out earlier this year:

Property Building Wood Floor Flooring




I like the appearance to look good and run well. I believe the original poster ( @cipher ) has gotten past the easy part. the cleanup painting. to prepare to reassemble. I believe celebration and realignment it will take nearly as long as the teardown and clean up.
Thanks. Yeah, calibrating the saw will take a little bit of work, but shouldn't be too tough. Setting the 0 and 45 degree stops is easy, aligning the wings is easy, and aligning the splitter is easy. Aligning the motor mount can be a little more challenging, especially if I need to get creative since this table saw only has a fastener on one side. And grinding to make the flange true will be a challenge for me.

sorry about the long trivia.
No worries, it's good stuff! :giggle: I enjoy reading about that kind of stuff and other people's experiences.
 

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@cipher

Good day:

you are correct when you say setting angle stops is easy that is not the part I was referring to.

before you put the cabinet back on put the trunnion assembly back in place lightly tighten the 4 bolts.

now the fun and hard part. I find it easier to suspend the top between two table tops so I can get you the four bolts easily. the blade must be parallel and dead on to your miter slots.

now put on a known good blade back on. it must not wobble any amount.
or buy a new one and still check it.

my guess you probably do not have a dial indicator.

rotate blade and make sure it does not drag just barely touches as you rotate all the way around.

there many good videos on how to do this. watch the videos then read and try the next part.

I took a piece of three-quarter inch would that would just fit in the miter saw about 8 inches long by about 3" high. use a 2 x 4 x 8" or 2 x 6 x 8" drill a quarter inch or 5/16 hole through it where you can run a pencil not sharpen. drill a hole in top outboard over your through Hole let's tread a machine screw into the hole this will allow you to bind the pencell where it won't move back and forth easily.
I found some videos showing how to do this.


saw alignment 1

saw alignment 2

saw alignment 3

good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
@cipher

Good day:

you are correct when you say setting angle stops is easy that is not the part I was referring to.

before you put the cabinet back on put the trunnion assembly back in place lightly tighten...

I found some videos showing how to do this.

saw alignment 2

good luck
Thanks! Video 2 looks a bit more useful than the first since I wouldn't rely on wood for measurements.

That's not too bad. Should be easy to adjust the trunnions provided the 0 and 45 degree angles are off by similar amounts. It only gets tricky if I'd need to add shims to correct the 45 degree blade placememt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
I've mocked up the cart I'll make for this saw in my CAD software. I tried to keep it simple. It's all 2x4s and one piece of 1/2" plywood. Simple butt joints with heavy screws, and four bolts to join the table to the cart.

The casters and levelers are just representative and not accurate. For the actual flip up/down casters I'll be using, scroll up to one of my previous posts.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Plank


This cart can catch some saw dust, but it's really to serve as a temporary place to throw cut off scraps.

I plan to add long wood screws from the bottom, and recess them slightly to attach all of the 2x4s, and shorter ones to attach the plywood. Then I'll use two long wood screws at each corner to attach the sides to the cross beams. The cross beams are also screwed to the 2x4 under it. The table legs are right around 2x2 inches, so I think this design will work well. And I could use an extra 1 1/2" of height (plus a little when leveling) on the saw since I'm 6' tall.

Screws from bottom and then from sides:

Wood Font Wood stain Rectangle Hardwood


The force exerted from the levelers and wheels should press inward, towards each other in this orientation. Since I don't have my table saw back together yet, I'll just be using my miter saw for the 2x4s and circular saw with a fence to cut the plywood. I have plenty of spare 2x4s, plywood, and wood screws in my garage.

Questions...

Do you think this is a good design?

Should I paint it the same light gray color as my arbor housing and cradle, or should I stain and finish it?


As for the other parts, they turned out pretty good. I'll be sanding and polishing all of the smooth surfaces and shaft holes before putting it back together. I'll probably keep the motor mount holes painted, since you position the motor mount once and let it in place (one less area to rust over time).

I forgot to remove the tape on one smooth section in the foreground for the cradle photo...

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Wood Tool Tin can Aluminum can Metal


Watch Bicycle part Auto part Gear Metal


Bicycle part Bicycle drivetrain part Auto part Wood Household hardware




The stand itself is in really good condition. I'm not sure if I want to paint it or not. After cleaning it, I did use rust inhibitor to treat any exposed metal near the bottom where the previous owner drilled holes for wheels, and where things rubbed against it. I also treated the bolts. Thoughts on painting it or not?

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The casters and levelers are just representative and not accurate. For the actual flip up/down casters I'll be using, scroll up to one of my previous posts.
Those lifting casters stick out a lot, but you have them going out under the wings, so they are out of the way of your feet, good.

Most of the lateral loads in use are fore/aft, maybe increase the base of the leveler feet in that direction? Moving the rear feet to the rear instead of the rear of the sides shouldn't be a problem, bring the front ones all the way to the front if they won't be toe catchers.

Are those legs 2x4s ripped in half? I'd leave them full 2x4, to be sure. The legs will have some anti racking strength from the tops and bottoms, but I'd still use bracing. You could use plywood triangles, I'd probably use rectangles, at least one full side and the full rear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
Bob, thanks for the good feedback...

Those lifting casters stick out a lot, but you have them going out under the wings, so they are out of the way of your feet, good.
Yup, they do stick out quite a bit due to their design, so I intentionally oriented them to the sides.

Most of the lateral loads in use are fore/aft, maybe increase the base of the leveler feet in that direction? Moving the rear feet to the rear instead of the rear of the sides shouldn't be a problem, bring the front ones all the way to the front if they won't be toe catchers.
I thought about that, but then having them mounted to the front and back of this cart would have them screwed into the wood parallel to the grain. I thought that might be a weak point, so I oriented them to the sides, but as far to the edges as possible. I could also make the cart deeper, but then as you mentioned above, it would get in the way of where I place my feet when using the table saw.

Are those legs 2x4s ripped in half? I'd leave them full 2x4, to be sure. The legs will have some anti racking strength from the tops and bottoms, but I'd still use bracing. You could use plywood triangles, I'd probably use rectangles, at least one full side and the full rear.
Everything is a full 2x4 except for the plywood tray that rests on top. The sides are two 2x4s joined lengthwise. I thought about adding metal brackets to reinforce, but I think this design should be sturdy enough to last a long, long time. If I'm not happy with its strength, I can always add metal brackets later. Most of the weight will be distributed along the 2x4 box structure along its greater dimension of 3.5 inches.

I'll certainly post photos when it's assembled and will update here if I run into any issues or concerns.

Thanks! :giggle:
 
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