Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 20 of 66 Posts

·
Registered
Information Technology
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm brand new here, as I just joined and this is my first post. I'm still getting my tools together to start this project, but I thought I'd share it get some feedback and advice. This post is about both my project and the table saw I purchased for it.

So... hello all! :)

Some Background
I'm a DIY guy and so was my father. I've learned quite a bit from him over the years. He passed away in 2015, so I inherited all of his tools, which includes quite a bit of word-working tools. Table saw, circular saw, chop saw, grinder, nail gun, 33 gallon air compressor, levels and squares, assorted power tools, and a ton of hand tons. I never bothered doing anything with all of these tools until my mother needed to move into a personal care home in 2019. I needed to rent out the home, so from 2019 to March of this year I spent a lot of time preparing for that by dismantling everything in their garage, including old hand-built cabinets, workbenches, and tons of pegboard. I dumped all of his tools into storage bins that line my own deep, 2-car garage and a separate rented storage unit. Now I'm designing and planning to build wrap around work benches and storage shelving to accommodate this influx of tools.

The state of my garage right now is quite messy, but at least somewhat organized. The wife wants to dump all of our seasonal decorations in here, so some storage bins of decorations are mixed in with the bins and bins of tools and supplies from my Dad. This was after spending a weekend cleaning to prepare for this project:

Bicycle Tire Wheel Shelf Building


I've done minor woodworking before, but never for the enjoyment of it. I've cut plenty of boards, assembled many projects, and sanded, stained, and finished more times than I can remember. From recent hand rails to meet code to custom mobile carts to simple cabinets and furniture. I've always done woodworking as a necessity to serve a purpose, and as such I merged my rather amateurish skill with attention to detail to make things that served their purpose and were fairly decent. So I've only really done butt joints for projects, and my level of fancy is 45 degree cuts to make the joints flush with some decent sanding and finishing. If you spent the time reading this, at least you know where I'm coming from in my approach to this project.

If you have any advice to offer for both this project and my pursuits mentioned within this post, I'm all ears (or in this case on a forum, all eyes). I welcome it, especially constructive criticism. I'm no woodworking pro, so I'm trying to be sponge to soak up all the helpful feedback and tips I can. However, feel free to use woodworking jargon and technical names, as I am familiar with most of it and can easily search for the rest.

Project
I'm an IT guy and much more handy with computers and software than I am with woodworking tools, so of course I used CAD software to layout my project. I'm trying to keep the workbenches simple, all butt joints, with a good helping of overbuilding to make up for my limited skills. I want to make these workbenches and storage shelving a permanent addition to my garage, but not to the level of using wood glue or removing drywall.

On that note, my garage is finished with drywall and baseboards, and all of that is painted. It's an attached garage with an insulated garage door, so temperature and humidity swings aren't that bad. I will most likely be cutting the baseboards down to make my project completely flush with the drywall, as I plan to use 8' 2x4s along it for stability and mounting pegboards, as shown in my rendering:

Chair Interior design Flooring Floor Wood


This isn't my latest version, so I did make some changes since I saved this image. In a follow up post I'll update with new images of the design. Notes:
  • The 45 degree support wedges are really supposed to be 2x4s cut with 45 degree ends for support of the shelves. My CAD program doesn't support 45 degree cut studs as a 3D object, but it did support triangles to represent that
  • A 2x4 running along the ceiling, parallel to the middle shelf. I discovered my ceiling's studs run perpendicular to that shelf, so attaching that support to multiple studs would be ideal.
  • The front portions of the front legs of workbenches will be cut down to 2x2s to take up less space. The sides of these legs will still be 2x4s.
  • The right side bench below the open shelves is 30" deep, but in my new design it's 40" deep and slightly taller so that I can roll my new table saw under it for storage.
  • There's about 21 of the vertical 8' 2x4s that run along the walls. You can see them on the right side, but they're mostly covered by peg board everywhere else.
  • If I get a bit more serious with woodworking in the future, I can always build a workbench to place in the middle of that area complete with dog/holdfast holes. For now, I'll do all of my woodworking from these static workbenches or a pre-made portable work bench. I may decide to add a 2x4 along the outside edge of one of the workbenches and mount a vice when I'm done.
Table Saw
I sold my Dad's portable Hitachi table saw a couple years ago to help get rid of things. I could have kept it, but I knew that if I wanted to use a table saw again, I wanted a contractor saw instead. And that's what I did last weekend: found a used table saw that was exactly what I wanted. The ubiquitous Craftsman 10" table saw. An 86 year-old gentlemen was selling it since he could no longer use it. He claims to have only used it a few times and always stored it in his garage. From its condition I believe him. He was asking $225 but I talked him down to $175 after some haggling.

So I found this Emerson-built 113 with a full cast iron top and skeletal cast-iron wings in my local area. It's a 113.298762 model from 1993 in amazing condition with only surface rust on the cast iron and iron nuts & bolts. He even had some spare (though used) 30T and 40T ripping blades included, along with the original manual. This was back when manuals were essential, lol! I also found it online in PDF format, but it was still so nice to have a physical copy around. No scratches on the top either! Heck, even the red-painted metal throat plate is almost like new. The owner had made and installed these big wooden wheels on it, which I quickly removed and let him keep... I did tease him a bit about these Trojan Horse wheels.

Original ad photos from seller:

Automotive tire Wheel Asphalt Hood Line

Automotive tire Gas Auto part Cooking Automotive wheel system

Musical instrument accessory Reel Camera accessory Audio equipment Gramophone record


I'm not going to upgrade anything major on it yet. In the future I might add a fixed splitter (no room for a riving knife) and a new fence. I'm completely tearing down the table saw to clean everything and replace a couple parts before reassembling it. The motor is in great condition and it runs, although not as smooth as I'd like. I bought new bearings for the arbor, new cast iron pulleys/sheaves (which term should I use?) instead of the OEM cast aluminum ones, a new link-style V belt, and of course a brand new saw blade. I got l lowering casters and plan to build a simple wheeled base for it that I can raise up on the wheels to move around. I also bought a GrabberPro push block to use with it when I'm all done.

I soaked all of the metal hardware in Apple Cider Vinegar for at least 24 hours, with some of it soaking for 3 days. Seems to have removed all of the surface rust on the iron parts so far. I only needed to wipe them clean with a paper towel... no scrubbing required. I still have another batch I just starting soaking yesterday. Then I store them in plastic containers where I soak them in WD-40.


Wood Cosmetics Font Gas Office supplies

Automotive tire Blue Motor vehicle Bumper Gas


Taking everything apart:

Wood Flooring Vehicle Automotive design Engineering


I also used WD-40 to clean the table top. A few 3M finishing pads (almost the same as a Scotch-Brite pad) and a lot of elbow grease removed all of the surface rust and most of the stains. The top is looking great! I let WD-40 soak into the top over night after the initial scrubbing, then cleaned it all off. Now my finger just glides along it. That work was very satisfying.

Before, with a single pass of cleaning on the right side of the top (left side in photo):
Wood Rectangle Road surface Automotive exterior Asphalt


I might spend a little more time cleaning the corners of the miter channels, but here's the result so far:
Light Automotive design Output device Bumper Wood


Question: the motor mount has an adjustable rail on the right side of it, near the belt. However, when I got it the motor was slanted a bit, ie: not parallel with the table. Is this normal, or is this adjustable when I reassemble it? Perhaps I might be able to adjust this with the motor mount that has two shafts connecting it to the saw cradle? I guess I can also add another bracket on the left side of the motor if adjustments don't help.

Future Projects
Eventually my next big projects are for the backyard. A new, bigger shed to replace my existing plastic shed, and also a renovation of our existing 30'x11' raised garden. The wife and I skipped gardening this year due to other life events, so this will in my mental queue in the next year or two.
 

·
Registered
Information Technology
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Looks like I accidentally posted this to Design & Plans instead of Project Showcase. Can an admin or mod move this post to that sub forum? Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Information Technology
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I've updated my design to include storing the table saw on the right side and provide limited woodworking functionality on the left side until I decide to do a full workbench later. Height at top of each table: woodworking bench is 36 3/4" high, middle table is 27 3/4" high, and right side tables are 40 3/4" high.
Table Wheel Architecture Interior design Floor




Table saw storage under desk with shelving above to store stains, paint, cleaners, adhesives, and other liquids:
Furniture Property Shelving Shelf Wood



Wood Architecture Building Shade Beam



Woodworking area with a 24" level added to show scale. The dog/holdfast holes are just an example, as I may drill those holes differently one I get a feeling for that work area.
Wood Interior design Flooring Building Rectangle



I'm going to use flat 2x4s underneath a 3/4" plywood top. I plan on being able to easily and cheaply replace the top instead of resurfacing it, which is why I'm using plywood. This isn't a serious woodworking bench, just a casual one to add into my wrap-around work tables. If I made a serious woodworking bench in the future, I would have it free-standing with 2x4s mounted sideways for the top to resurface as needed.
Wood Rectangle Architecture Urban design Material property
 

·
Administrator
David - Machinist in wood
Joined
·
6,230 Posts
free-standing
I would find it difficult to work with a bench up against the wall for most projects I do. I have one but it serves specific purposes, most of my work is accomplished on a bench where I can get around all sides.
 

·
Registered
Information Technology
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would find it difficult to work with a bench up against the wall for most projects I do. I have one but it serves specific purposes, most of my work is accomplished on a bench where I can get around all sides.
Yeah, I have the same reservations. I have one of those old portable Black & Decker work benches with the wedge dogs I can use, but eventually it would be nice to build a free-standing woodworking bench after this project. I need to organize the garage first and incorporate all of my father's old tools, so this takes priority and should get me by for now. Once I build a separate woodworking bench, I can then switch out the plywood top of this one and use it for scraps.
 

·
Premium Member
A cat made me do it.
Joined
·
1,376 Posts
For a free standing bench in a garage that you still want to park in, consider putting wheels on the bench, then have storage shelves that have space under them for the bench. Even locking caster wheels aren't as steady as I'd like for a work bench. So I use non locking swivel casters and then put leveler feet on too. There are a zillion sellers of these feet, they don't look impressive but with 4 of them working together they have been plenty steady and strong enough for me.
I use a cordless drill to raise and lower the feet. You can just get the bench steady, or you can level it, great for garage floors that have a bit of a slope to a drain.
 

·
Registered
Information Technology
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
For a free standing bench in a garage that you still want to park in, consider putting wheels on the bench, then have storage shelves that have space under them for the bench. Even locking caster wheels aren't as steady as I'd like for a work bench. So I use non locking swivel casters and then put leveler feet on too. There are a zillion sellers of these feet, they don't look impressive but with 4 of them working together they have been plenty steady and strong enough for me.
I use a cordless drill to raise and lower the feet. You can just get the bench steady, or you can level it, great for garage floors that have a bit of a slope to a drain.
That's a good idea, thanks!

For the wheeled bottom I'm making for my table saw I'm using these cheap Made in China retractable wheels that seem to work well when testing them: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08CKZN5ZQ

But I saw online some swivel wheels that have brakes which also lock the swivel. Still not perfect, so those levels you linked is a good idea.
 

·
Registered
mechanical engineering
Joined
·
327 Posts
@cipher

these were the ones that had been made for the craftsman tools

Gas Electric blue Metal Machine Auto part


link ebay Sears Craftsman Table Saw Swiveling Step-Up Caster

can be found on ebay. need four

down side the are old and the wheels are a hard plastic and break. i put new wheels on mine.
Table Automotive tire Wood Automotive design Audio equipment


drilled out the pin and used a long shoulder 3/16 bolt for the new wheel axial, with a self locking nut.
old black, new red

Automotive tire Floor Automotive design Flooring Composite material


you will need four leg levelers ebay link Craftsman Table Saw, Adjustable Leveling Feet

Automotive tire Jewellery Personal protective equipment Auto part Concrete


there is a number of them out there
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
MY opinion but beingings you have the saw that far disembled I would purchase a new set of bearings on the spindle. Option for a rubber sealed bearing instead of the steel shields. The shields do not keep dust and particles out of them. Cost difference is minimal.

I think you have a great plan there. Do know if you built it 100 times it would be different EVERY time 😁 😁 . Start small on your projuect and work your way up, If you don't have a tool for a specific job purchase it. Do consider how often you will need that tool (best guess) and spend money accordingly. Everyday use means a higher quality tool should be bought.

Keep us in the loop. Oh! And welcome to the madness... er, I mean forum! haha

Ken
 

·
Registered
Information Technology
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@cipher
these were the ones that had been made for the craftsman tools

link ebay Sears Craftsman Table Saw Swiveling Step-Up Caster

can be found on ebay. need four

down side the are old and the wheels are a hard plastic and break. i put new wheels on mine.

drilled out the pin and used a long shoulder 3/16 bolt for the new wheel axial, with a self locking nut.
old black, new red

you will need four leg levelers ebay link Craftsman Table Saw, Adjustable Leveling Feet

there is a number of them out there
Thanks! Yours looks awesome, I love it. You kept it to the original design.

I found those online as well when I was looking to see what sort of base/wheels I was going to add, The hardware looked quite rusty and it was $12 each in bulk, which means for $48 plus $13 shipping which adds up to way more than the casters I ordered. And worse, I'd have to soak all of that hardware in acid/vinegar to clean off the rust, and then I'm still left with possibly brittle plastic I'd need to replace. Just too much time and money to get original casters. :(

I'm making an attached base of wood and will add leveling bolts to them as well. Going for an "H" design with the long sections parallel to the saw blade and the braces in the middle perpendicular. That way I'll still have plenty of room to step closer to the table saw. And the casters will be mounted to the side which gives even more support for the extra weight of the cast-iron wings.
 

·
Registered
Information Technology
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
MY opinion but beingings you have the saw that far disembled I would purchase a new set of bearings on the spindle. Option for a rubber sealed bearing instead of the steel shields. The shields do not keep dust and particles out of them. Cost difference is minimal.
Yup, I mentioned I'm replacing the bearings. I bought both these and these and may return the one I don't like or just keep them as spares. I'm also replacing the pulleys with these cast iron ones.

I think you have a great plan there. Do know if you built it 100 times it would be different EVERY time 😁 😁 . Start small on your projuect and work your way up, If you don't have a tool for a specific job purchase it. Do consider how often you will need that tool (best guess) and spend money accordingly. Everyday use means a higher quality tool should be bought.

Keep us in the loop. Oh! And welcome to the madness... er, I mean forum! haha

Ken
Thanks! :)

My plan is to build it in sections, so I might start with the right corner, then continue with the left corner, and finally the middle work bench. Still not sure if I'll take a vacation to do it across a week, or just tackle bit by bit on the weekends.

I'm still not sure how I'll handle the logistics of assembling it. For example, I might assemble a work bench on its side with the 8' studs, then turn it right-side up and attach to wall, and then assemble the shelving separately and attach to the studs. But once I'm actually starting it, who knows, might be easier to tackle it differently. Any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Information Technology
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I used wire brushes on my drill and RotoZip to clean off the surface rust on the larger cast-iron parts including the cradle, arbor housing, and underside of the table. For the cradle and arbor housing it then coated them with mineral oil. They eventually oxidized to that nice black, cast iron color. For the table I then sprayed it with rust inhibitor and got it to turn completely black.

What do you think, should I paint the underside of the table or just stop at the rust inhibitor?

Wood Road surface Rectangle Flooring Gas


Motor vehicle Font Bumper Automotive exterior Automotive design


Wood Working animal Automotive tire Personal protective equipment Bumper


Dishware Automotive tire Wood Serveware Electric blue



Also I was finally able to remove the two bearings from the arbor. Those bearings scratched up the nice shiny surface when removing them (the bearings themselves, not me), so I'll be polishing that up a bit just so I feel better about it. I know it won't make any difference. ;) Any ways, I did have to grind down a bit of the end near the pulley side that seems to be either a defect or damaged at some point. It made it impossible to remove the bearing. The pulley should still rest flat on the rest of it.

Wood Ingredient Cuisine Hand tool Table
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
You will know that machine inside and out before you are done!

I will warn you that it is easy to spend all your time building a shop instead of building projects. Based on your level of detail in this post, that seems likely that's not a bad thing if you enjoy it, just be aware
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
31,739 Posts
There seems to be an excessive amount of arbor extending beyond the face of the backing flange. Is the flange in the factory location, or has it moved?

Wood Table Hand tool Ingredient Cuisine
 

·
Administrator
David - Machinist in wood
Joined
·
6,230 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Yup, I mentioned I'm replacing the bearings. I bought both these and these and may return the one I don't like or just keep them as spares. I'm also replacing the pulleys with these cast iron ones.
Personally, I would return both sets of bearings and purchase a set of rubber sealed bearings. Will still be the same bearing number as on the shield (6202) but look for a suffix like "2RS or VV". https://www.astbearings.com/bearing-closures.html

Good choice on using cast iron sheaves (pulleys). I painted the trunion on my saw but did nothing to the underside of the table. Looking very nice. I don't remember if my arbor stuck out that far or not. I know the flange is pressed on very tight. I would hazard a guess it is OK as when you mount a dado blade, the dado will have a lot of extra width that must be accommodated.

Ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
There seems to be an excessive amount of arbor extending beyond the face of the backing washer. It the washer in the factory location, or has it moved?
I agree with @woodnthings, that doesn't look right. I think the arbor flange is usually close to the end of the arbor threads. The way this one looks, I think the nut would bottom out on the threads before it got tight on a regular blade, even with the removeable flange/washer on the nut side. I think the length of the threads allows enough room to mount a molding head or dado set.
 

·
Registered
Information Technology
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Personally, I would return both sets of bearings and purchase a set of rubber sealed bearings. Will still be the same bearing number as on the shield (6202) but look for a suffix like "2RS or VV". https://www.astbearings.com/bearing-closures.html
I think I'll just roll (pun intended) with one of the current bearings. I will most likely dissasemble it and replace them in the future years from now anyways. But if I do replace them again in the future, I'll go the route you recommend. And thanks for the bearing type info... that was very helpful!

I don't remember if my arbor stuck out that far or not.
I agree with @woodnthings, that doesn't look right. I think the arbor flange is usually close to the end of the arbor threads. The way this one looks, I think the nut would bottom out on the threads before it got tight on a regular blade, even with the removeable flange/washer on the nut side. I think the length of the threads allows enough room to mount a molding head or dado set.
Yeah, it looks long in the photo, but that flange doesn't move at all, lol. I know it didn't bottom out. When I reassemble it, I'll double check it.

If I need to, how do I move that flange? It's so tight!
 
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
Top