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Discussion Starter #1
I have spent the last week in my shop cleaning up, organizing, sharpening tools, throwing stuff out, etc. I had three larger blanks of green wood that I bought in the summer from a local mill that does their own logging and then saws up the wood. I cut them into circles on the bandsaw, then roughed them out and left them about an inch thick. They are 12-13" in diameter. I sealed the top edge with anchorseal and then placed each in it's own paper grocery bag with a few handfuls of shavings. I didn't get picutes of the cherry blank, but the other two are ambrosia maple and figured maple. Fun evening, lots of shavings, and some bowls that should be dry enough to turn in the spring.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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just a dude
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I opened this thread expecting to see what the bowls of the future were going to look like.:laughing: If anyone could do it...


Still looks like a pretty good day at the office.

Rob
 

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4Woodturning
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Those are going to make some great bowls. Be seeing them finished this summer.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
One of the reasons I put these pics on is because I know we have a good number of newer turners on this site that are starting to get into bowls. I wanted to show what to do with those big pieces of wet wood so you don't have to wait 4 or 5 years to turn it dry. Turning the wet wood is a lot more fun, and then the shorter drying time isn't too long too wait. The wet wood is also a lot easier on the tools.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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Mike -- thanks for illustrating your process with photos.

Am I right in thinking that you shape the outside first (with it attached to a faceplate)? What's the method you used to get it turned around so you can shape the inside?
 

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Mike Looks like your having too much fun. I quit using the shavings a long time ago. I anchorseal the end grain and sometimes the whole lip and maybe the tenon. Then I put them in paper sacks for a month or so. Sometimes I'll stack 3 or 4 together and put them in a box and just fold the lid over.
You may be the only person I know who actually uses the factory guard. :) We had a discussion about them one time and everyone decided it made a decent barbecue grill.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
John,
I'm laughing as I am typing this. The shavings I do as sort of a sacrifice to the wood gods. I don't know if it does anything, but I figure if I don't, that would be the blank that will crack. I try to make it a habit to use the guard when roughing out the large pieces. We had a couple pieces come off our lathe at our turning club last year during a demo and luckily no one was hurt. I write our newsletter for the club and last year I started including an article each month called "Safety First". These articles are based on mishaps or near mishaps our club members have had, so we are trying to stress safety while turning. The guard really isn't that bad once you get used to it. Here's a link to our club website for anybody that wants to read our newsletters and see what we do:
http://northcoastwoodturners.org/Home.aspx

Duncsuss,
Yes, I start out with a faceplate and shape the outside of the bowl and form a dovetail tenon that fits the jaws of my chuck. Then I take off the faceplate and put the chuck back on and fasten the bowl by the tenon. On larger blanks I will bring up the tailstock with a cone-shaped live center and leave it in place while I remove most of the inside of the bowl. Once most of it is gone, then I will back off the tailstock and remove what's left in the center. I usually do this on green wood only.
Mike Hawkins;)
 
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