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Not sure about Aqueous Ammonia. I used Anhydrous Ammonia.
When you consider that Anhydrous Ammonia has all the water removed and household ammonia is only 5% to 10% ammonia (90 to 95% water), it would seem that it may not work at all.
 

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Gene Howe said:
Not sure about Aqueous Ammonia. I used Anhydrous Ammonia. When you consider that Anhydrous Ammonia has all the water removed and household ammonia is only 5% to 10% ammonia (90 to 95% water), it would seem that it may not work at all.
Where did you get you ammonia?
 

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I'm on my phone, so I don't know how to post old threads. I made a build thread called
Craftsman style sidetable, in it I explained how I did my fuming. It might be of some
use to you.
 

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I've done a few small pieces (shoebox size) and had good results with fuming. I was able to put the item inside a Rubbermaid container on some blocks and poured ammonia in the bottom. It worked well for me, but I have no idea if you'd be able to get the same results with such a larger piece.

Edit: Forgot to add the word "household" in front of ammonia. ;)
 

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I've used regular Parson's Ammonia before and it worked just fine.

Andy, fuming is done on oak to darken it. The ammonia fumes react with the tannin in oak and causes a browner color. Originally discovered when oak beams in barns were darkened by the fumes from horse urine.
 

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http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f13/craftsman-style-sidetable-46992/

I did a test run using household ammonia at 10% before I ended up getting a stronger solution of 28%. This was using scrap pieces.

First off I'm no expert but I have done a lot of research on the matter and have had done it so this is what I found. Take it or leave, up to you.

The ammonia does interact with the tannins in the wood and that is what causes the color change. There is no way knowing how much tannins are present in your particular wood, the less amount present in the wood will bring out less of a color change and depth of penetration if you are using a weaker solution.
I found using the 28% ammonium hydroxide was the best. It still took 18 hours to achieve my desired color, but that was because it was cold and temperature does affect it. I had almost 3/8" depth of color change to the wood.
I am by no means saying that household ammonia won't work, just my findings and what I use. Good luck!
 

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I've used regular Parson's Ammonia before and it worked just fine.

Andy, fuming is done on oak to darken it. The ammonia fumes react with the tannin in oak and causes a browner color. Originally discovered when oak beams in barns were darkened by the fumes from horse urine.
To add, fuming was originally used on mission and craftsman furniture. It tended to color white oak and red oak more consistently. It was abandoned as a commercial coloring process in the 1920's or 30' because of the danger to workers. The fumes from high strength ammonia were very dangerous as was the ammonia itself. Professional and commercial finishers now use dyes to get the colors they want on oak.
 

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What about diesel exhaust fluid??? 32.5% ammonia and 67.5 % water. Not sure what type of ammonia it is, I know when spilt it will crystalize. I am new to fuming always wanted to try it. But I am a tech and got lots of access to DEF. When I get a chance I will look at the msds and see what type of ammonia it is, might worth a shot
 

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Not sure, might be wrong and it may not work. Urea is made from ammonia and carbon dioxide, then it goes through more processes than ammonia. Compound make up: CH4N2O+H2O
 

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Ahhh crap. What temp were you trying it at? Going to be in the teens and single digits at night
I don't remember exactly, but it was cold. Not your kind of cold though! that's freezing cold.

I think the lower temp affects the ammonia more than the wood, I read an article about how in days gone by the craftsman would put the ammonia in a metal dish and then put a candle under it , but don't put ammonia in a foil pan! I used an old Tupperware dish.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I went with a stain since its goong to be very cold for a few months. Im giving the table to my sister for christmas. I will try this when it is warmer.
 
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