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Today I picked up a Fulton 3710 (Stanley No. 4 equivalent) to restore for a non-woodworker friend who collects "old" things and wanted to have an "old-but-restored" hand plane.

I have not found much information on Fulton planes. If anyone has links, I would appreciate being able to read more information on this series of hand planes.

Here are a couple of as-received pictures.

I have no idea on the date, and since I have not found any Type studies, no further information.

This lateral adjustment lever has a single right angle bend, seen in the second picture. This style is similar to Millers Falls. I have seen other pictures of Fulton planes which have the double bended lateral adjustment lever similar to Sargent planes.

I wonder if this badge was made by other companies.

Plane_Fulton_3710_right_original1440.jpg

The left side of the casting has 3710 lightly stamped in the lower side of the casting. Not visible with the rust. I did hand cleanup of the superficial rust and then the stamping was visible.

The knob is good, just needs to be re-finished. The tote had a break at the top which someone attempted to repair with glue. Seems solid, but the repair is so obvious, I will need to make a new tote.

The lateral adjustment lever is folded over at the blade end to save costs. Stanley have a round piece riveted to the lateral adjustment lever.

Plane_Fulton_3710_components_rear_1443.jpg

This is my first Fulton. It seems to be a lower manufacturing point than the Stanley/Bailey. No frog adjustment. The adjustment wheel is plated steel rather than brass. The blade seems thinner than a normal Stanley blade. The previous owner had sharpened by hand. Not a good job, but not as bad as some of the butcher jobs I have seen.

I have been cleaning up the castings by hand. The rust is very superficial. I put the steel screws and adjustment wheel in oxalic acid. The rust was not bad, but should be easier to cleanup after a dip in the oxalic acid.

I will provide "after" pictures in a later update.

Thanks for looking.
 

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Log dog
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Looks great Dave, and such a kind thing to do for a friend. I'm sure you'll find out more about it and make it shine like a new Penny.
Can't wait to see it finished.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Fulton was a lesser quality plane sold by sears. I think most of them were made by Sargent. They really are not bad, but I agree, they are not normal Stanley quality.
I saw a site where they mentioned Sargent made the planes, and I have seen examples where the lateral adjustment lever had the double bend.

This particular plane has the single bend like Millers Falls. Perhaps Sears contracted with more than one company over time.

I agree this is not a bad plane. I can see the cost savings, for example the thin blade, the lateral adjustment lever being folded over at the end instead of two pieces.

I showed the in-progress plane to my friend and he is happy to be the future owner. The rust was superficial, so everything is cleaning up nicely. The original paint is in very good condition.

I did some test cuts. I can make shavings, but I was surprised to need more force that my Stanley No. 4. I may need to sharpen this more than the Stanley.

For my friends desire to just own an old plane, he will be happy.

I cleaned off the old finish from the knob, and have to make a new tote.

I will post pictures of the final restoration.
 

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Final update

I made the new tote and applied the finish, Tru-Oil is working well for me.

I was not happy with the cutting, so I re-sharpened the blade. Now working much better.

The after restoration picture showing this is now making nice consistent fluffy shavings better than the earlier test cuts.

Front view. I am happy I replaced the tote, it would be a shame to have this restoration with a tote with an obvious crack on the tote.

I sanded the knob and removed as much finish as possible.

Both the knob and tote are stained with the same walnut get stain. The knob came out more red due to the residual old stain in the wood.

The tote is walnut, but was very light sapwood on this side. The walnut stain looks natural.

Plane_Fulton_3710_right_front_after_restoration_1496.jpg

Rear view. Shows the adjustment wheel cleaned up nicely. Steel in this case.

Plane_Fulton_3710_left_rear_after_restoration_1497.jpg

Since my friend is not a wood worker and wanted this for display, I decided to make a little display stand from a scrap piece of cherry.

The display stand.

Plane_Fulton_display_stand_1498.jpg

The display stand with a piece of drawer liner. This is means to have anti-rust properties. I hope so since it is in my steel drawers where I am storing my planes.

Plane_Fulton_display_stand_with_mat_1499.jpg

Finally the restored plane in the display stand, just like it will be seen at my friends.

Plane_Fulton_3710_after_restoration_on_display_stand_1500.jpg

I am happy how this turned out. I think my friend will be happy.

Thanks for looking.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I sent a link to this thread to my friend and he replied he was very happy.

The display base was a surprise. He likes this touch.

Another happy end to a restoration and a good new home for the tool. It will get lots of rest, but it will be appreciated.
 

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Turning Wood Into Art
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nice looking plane Dave. Look ssimilar to mine but not sure what brand it is, I just picked up a #3, Ive been told it dates to 1898 - 1902, will tell you more about it soon
 

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Nice Job!

Could you tell us more about the walnut stain you used?

and what type of wood do they use for the handle and the tote?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Nice Job!

Could you tell us more about the walnut stain you used?

and what type of wood do they use for the handle and the tote?
Thanks. I rarely stain these days so I hate to purchase stain, especially for a small job like this. I looked at the stains I had available and decided to use the Minwax Gel Stain "Walnut 606".

I tried paint stripper and sanding, but the colour from the original finish did not want to come out. I am not sure what wood was originally used. This is the knob after stripping and sanding. Your guess on wood species may be as good as mine. Likely whatever was available for low price. Not a lot of grain showing.

I did not strip the tote, gave it to my friend so he can display be original and the replacement. He was happy I did replace. Likely the same wood.

Plane_knob_Fulton_3710_after_sanding_1454.jpg

I used a piece of walnut for the replacement tote. The piece was a mix of sap wood and heart wood, so part light and part brown.

I was initially going for a darker stain, but after the first coat, I liked how this looked so did not apply another coat.
 
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