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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a new front door, during the staining process I was distracted by a telephone call which allowed the stain to dry in a certain area, once returning to the door with the stain it doubled up on the dry section causing a colour difference. Now it looks terrible and I can't use it as a front door in this condition. I tried to sand it back down with a belt sander and the new stain just clogged up the belt. I would like to know if you have any ideas that might help me to recover this lovely door?

Bret Marshall
 

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what type was the original stain?

Was it a solvent based stain like a Minwax? If so you can load a rag with mineral spirits or lacquer thinner and wash as much of the stain away as possible. Then reapply the stain and blend the area to a uniform color and even value. I have sprayed on Minwax stain with good results to get it an even color.

How about more info and a photo of what you have so far?
 
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I would use an MC based stripper (methylene chloride) to remove as much as possible. Follow the label directions to a "T". The stuff is very toxic. The remainder use lacquer thinner to wipe off. If the door is ready to restain, and you have the ability to spray, use a dye in the color you want to blend in the old with the bare. You can reapply the dye as needed to tone in the color.






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I would never advise one to use a belt sander on a door. The area you sanded will stain different unless you sand the entire door the same.

Pulling the stain out of the wood with solvent on a rag is where I'd start then sand the whole door evenly with a ROS, be carefully because most doors nowadays have just thin veneers on the faces and once you sand through that you've got real problems.

Bret
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Was it a solvent based stain like a Minwax? If so you can load a rag with mineral spirits or lacquer thinner and wash as much of the stain away as possible. Then reapply the stain and blend the area to a uniform color and even value. I have sprayed on Minwax stain with good results to get it an even color.

How about more info and a photo of what you have so far?

Thank you for your reply,

The stain was a water base, will try to get a photo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would never advise one to use a belt sander on a door. The area you sanded will stain different unless you sand the entire door the same.

Pulling the stain out of the wood with solvent on a rag is where I'd start then sand the whole door evenly with a ROS, be carefully because most doors nowadays have just thin veneers on the faces and once you sand through that you've got real problems.

Bret
Thank you for your reply, will try that. If it doesn't work out, would I be able to apply a paint onto the stain and cover the entire door?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·


I would use an MC based stripper (methylene chloride) to remove as much as possible. Follow the label directions to a "T". The stuff is very toxic. The remainder use lacquer thinner to wipe off. If the door is ready to restain, and you have the ability to spray, use a dye in the color you want to blend in the old with the bare. You can reapply the dye as needed to tone in the color.










Thank you for your reply, it was a water based stain. If it doesn't work out could I apply a paint to the door to cover the entire area? If so what would you reccommend. Thanka again.
 
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