Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,455 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A friend of mine who lives in Arizona recently asked me to make her an end grain cutting board. I live in northeast Pa. Board is black walnut and hard maple, 10 x 12 x 1" thick. Here's a picture, just because


image-948252470.jpg


For the geographically challenged, Pa and Az are separated by 2000 or so miles and have drastic climactic differences, the most concerning of which is the average relative humidity.

I've seasoned the board with 6 coats of mineral oil and beeswax.

Is this thing going to freak out when it hits super dry Arizona air?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
Just spit-balling here: What if you wrapped it up real well with plastic wrap to seal it somewhat. Once it was in AZ, let it set a week or two before unwrapping. That might slow any 'drying' taking place.

Bill
 

·
Log dog
Joined
·
7,935 Posts
I doubt there's anything you can do to control that issue. If its gonna move, it's gonna move.
BTW Brian it looks really nice.
 

·
SS user
Joined
·
2,689 Posts
Depends on what part of AZ.
Tucson area...probably no problems. Up north, the same. But the PHX area is problematic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,455 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Gilbert. About 5 miles SE of Phoenix. I guess I'll just have to cross my fingers. If nothing else it'll be an interesting experiment ;-) Its been sitting inside a cardboard box packed in shredded newspaper, hoping that will draw out any excess moisture slowly before I ship it.
Thanks for the input guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
One big factor is going to be the "treatment" it receives by the end user. If it's washed repeatedly and left wet, run through the dishwasher, etc, it's gonna suffer. If its washed and dried by hand and re-oiled occasionally, different story. I made a bunch last fall, and the recipients received a jar of mineral oil and instructions with the board..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I think it will be fine as long as the wood was in the same environment long enough to stabilize before gluing up.
I have never made a cutting board like that.
-Did you glue it up all at once or did you glue it up in sections?
-How did you clamp it?
-Was it difficult keeping all the corners of the individual pieces aligned?
-What type of glue did you use?
Hope this isn't to many questions to answer.
 

·
Wood Snob
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
Well done BZ on building the board correctly by going end grain up. I'm not sure why the choice on two different woods and colors. I would be more concerned over the choice of glue than the life it will have in AZ. My sister kept a Steinway from losing its tone in AZ and I'm sure it's not the first cutting board to cross the AZ line.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,455 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
handymanrichard said:
I think it will be fine as long as the wood was in the same environment long enough to stabilize before gluing up.
I have never made a cutting board like that.
-Did you glue it up all at once or did you glue it up in sections?
-How did you clamp it?
-Was it difficult keeping all the corners of the individual pieces aligned?
-What type of glue did you use?
Hope this isn't to many questions to answer.
Here goes:
- glued it up in 2 separate laminations. First like this:

image-4208421378.jpg


Then crosscut & flipped every other piece end over end, like this:

image-2593630418.jpg



image-171122294.jpg



Clamping was done using cauls for alignment, like this:


image-1530121876.jpg

The side cauls keep the rows straight, the top & bottom cauls keep the lamination flat. It really helps to have an extra set of hands when clamping. Also your strips have to be nice and square and exactly the same width, otherwise your squares won't line up.

Glue used was Titebond III. Waterproof and food safe, with a longer open time than TB II (which is also acceptable).

Search the project showcase section for Kenbo's tutorial, it was a great step-by-step for how to make one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
+1 for recommending Kenbo's tutorial on it. That's what stepped me through the process when I made my first 5 (all at the same time).

Btw, I moved from Tucson to central PA. BEST...DECISION...EVER. I pity your cutting board. :laughing:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Thanks BZawat,

Its great you took a picture record of the project.

I am moving my shop witch is now on the other side of the city and shoehorning it into my 20x20 garage.
This should take about a month after witch I know what one of my first fun projects will be.

:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,455 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I take a lot of pictures of just about everything new that I do in the shop. This way I have reference for later on if I need it, and it makes it easier to explain the process to someone else if necessary.

The eventual goal I had in mind when I made my first end grain cutting board is a full-size freestanding butcher block. I figured I would start small, and work out the kinks that way. The butcher block will be a freestanding Island in my kitchen. It will be composed of 3 x 3 maple boards, at a thickness of about 12 inches. Each 3 x 3 corner will extend all the way to the floor as a leg, and there will be a shelf below. I can't wait to start it, but I'm just too busy right now. Will probably have to wait until the winter.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top