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Discussion Starter #1
does anyone use friction polish?
if so, is it any good?
whats the best way to apply it on the lathe?
thanks
 

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Splinter Cushion
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661 Posts
When I started turning, I used Shellawax liquid friction polish for pens, bottle stoppers, and tops. It put a shiny nice finish on, but I found that it wore off pretty quickly. When I do craft shows, I put a picture frame on my table as a test track for the tops, and I found that after just a couple hours of people trying out the tops, the friction polish wears off the handle.

Again, this was the liquid Shellawax. To apply it, I'd sand my project to 15,000 using micromesh, then put a dab of the friction polish on a paper towel, then turn it onto the project. Keeping the paper towel moving, I would rub back and forth with moderate pressure to get the friction to warm up the polish. It's basically heat activated. It dries quickly and you can build it up in multiple coats.
 

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When I started turning, I used Shellawax liquid friction polish for pens, bottle stoppers, and tops. It put a shiny nice finish on, but I found that it wore off pretty quickly. When I do craft shows, I put a picture frame on my table as a test track for the tops, and I found that after just a couple hours of people trying out the tops, the friction polish wears off the handle.

Again, this was the liquid Shellawax. To apply it, I'd sand my project to 15,000 using micromesh, then put a dab of the friction polish on a paper towel, then turn it onto the project. Keeping the paper towel moving, I would rub back and forth with moderate pressure to get the friction to warm up the polish. It's basically heat activated. It dries quickly and you can build it up in multiple coats.
OK so you just gave us good instructions on how to apply a finish that won't last. How about some info on the polish/finish you now use and like.:laughing: I was much more interested in what you replaced the finish type with since you didn't like it and seemed to be heading in that direction. But you left me hanging there like a movie with a bad ending.:laughing:
 

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Splinter Cushion
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661 Posts
:D

Lately, I've been using lacquer. It goes on more easily, dries just as quickly, and is more durable. I put on a couple coats while the piece is on the lathe, and, depending on what it is and how shiny I want it, I might brush, rub, or spray some more lacquer on after I've parted the piece.

Friction polish seemed like a great idea, and I guess it's a good finish for something that won't take a lot of handling, but for pens and tops, it didn't last for me. Maybe I didn't use it correctly. :p
 
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