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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been asked to get some 'dings' out of a small (wood lined) boat (galley kitchen and bathroom..no Im not nautical so I dont know the terms ha ha!!!)..and bring the wood 'back to life'!

Now Im still studying (Ive not even seen the job yet).

Raising the 'dings' out the wood is not the problem...but what do I use to bring the wood back to life? Wax? coat of garnet, button etc? yacht varnish? or take the whole lot back and start again?

yacht varnish? or shellac?..does the seaspray effect either

(ok Im a numpty..but Ive not been down this path before):glare:
 

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I wouldn't think polish would be a lot of fun on this sort of thing. I believe tung oil is used often, have you checked into that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wouldn't think polish would be a lot of fun on this sort of thing. I believe tung oil is used often, have you checked into that?
Mmmm a lot of fun maybe...but what if it all goes wrong:huh:

never used tung oil...anyone done this kinda thing before:glare:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You have hit the nail in the head Cabinetman...there seems to be a dearth of polishers in this area.

But how do you know what has been used before? I have had experience of 'reactions' when french polishing. My solution is always strip it back and start again (my lecturer who is fantastic) says..."its not an exact science"..."it's a risk you take"...just thought there might have been someone in here who works specifically in this field:blink:

As you say..if I can get it right..Ive got enough work to last me a lifetime..especially when we have a state of the art marina just a few miles from my home
 

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I was watching one of those documentaries on TV about boat/shipbuilders. The largest area was somewhere in New England, I can't remember where. The biggest problem they had was finding qualified craftsmen, not sales. I fear with all the new technology that we are in a craft that is losing it's traditional roots. I take pride in the handwork of the trade, and to earn a living at it isn't easy but sure is satisfying. All my kids are already in their own line of work other than woodworking, but I do have a few grandkids that I'm workin' on. :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
thank you for your reply. Yes I agree, there are very few people interested in the finer points of the trade...work on your granchildren...maybe in the future people will wake up and smell the coffee.

I myself am passionate about the traditional route of restoration..I would rather put pins in my eyes than use staples, PVA glue, foam, and laquer.

Im all for 'animal glue' 'tacks', 'coia' 'horsehair' and callico in my restotation..plus shellac for any polishing I do... Im hoping one day to be affiliated with BAFRA...british association for furniture restorers...but they are a hard nut to crack..I have nothing but respect for them...they work very hard.

meanwhile..there have not been many replies on polishing boats interiors...is it a secret?

I worked on a cruise ship last November from Rome to Marseilles in France (sounds great but to be honest GOD AWFUL hard work)..We used a certain amount of precat..oil based stains...thinners (aerosals) and wax fillers..it was hard work and to be totally honest..I didnt feel good about any of it in the end. The money was good..but it's not the path I want to go down

I like to think by the time Im qualified..I will be a fine furniture restorer...using all the traditional techniques
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would like to add...that although Im in college in Glasgow, Scotland, surrounded by wonderful history, furniture, architecture....there is no-one in my course..who has half the passion that I have...which makes coffee/lunch breaks...a bit tiresome:blink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I apologise if Ive given out this website without due respect to the founders
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Oh...and they are nothing to to with me....I would love to be a member...still it a very interesting and informative site.
 

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If you have a boat chances are there will be people on this boat. The wine WILL flow...{not fer the skipper though}.
French polish is alcohol based. Wine {surprise} has alcohol in it.
Proprietary solvent.
Spillage WILL occur!!!
Therefore, all you're hard rubbing {ad nauseum} shall be for naught.

Just my .002":thumbsup:
 

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Skelf,

My work is on boats. Electrical not refinishing wood surfaces. From hanging around them, I've found most are finished with oil or varnish. Most owners are probably using a teak oil that has tung oil and other ingredients if their interiors are oiled. I think you should be up front with the customer about what can be expected from a patch job vs. a complete re-finish. I don't know how old the boat is, but if she's a middle aged gal anything you touch with sandpaper is going to be a different color than the surrounding area. Talk to the owner about his goals for the boat. Is he just keeping it for a year or for 30 years. Is he restoring the boat or just freshening it up a bit. If he wants a quick clean up and plans to a better job later, try to talk him into doing less of the boat correctly and doing more later. You will make more money because he will want the rest of the boat to look as good as the part you just did. You will have a better show case for your work when his friends see it. If the owner specifies a shoddy fix, your name and reputation will be associated with the shoddy work when others see the finished result. The boating community is pretty tight and word of mouth is very important. I do not advertise and have more work in season than I can do. When you give your estimate, keep in mind that you'll be reaching and stretching for almost everything and you should probably double your first impression.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you very much for the very informative reply TomD.

It's good to get advice from someone who knows the nature of the job. I will take all your points into consideration when I tackle the job.

;)
 

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Skelf,

There are products like Cetol, Armada etc. While there is nothing like a varnish finish, done properly, these finishes hold up amazingly well and look much closer to varnish than to oil. They build fast and you don't have to sand in between coats. Sanding between coats does give a better finish, but you can also put on three coats and give it one good sanding before the finish coat. The time saved sanding between coats is no small amount and you still get a really decent finish. This is from experience on my own boat. Another option for older boats that look dark from all teak interiors, is to paint out some prominent bulkheads and leave just the moldings natural in color with a gloss finish. This can work well around windows where condensation has stained the veneer. If you have questions, PM me. There's a lot I don't know and I'll gladly share what little I do know. I've painted the outside of a few boats and have a feel for what last and when cost should be a factor in selecting the finish products.


Tom
 

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There are so many ways to skin this cat, so to say. some good advice so far. first how old is the boat? second, when was the last time any finishing was done to her? Third, is it a yacht or schooner or what? fourth, are you planning on steaming the dents out or filling etc?? fifth, is this the only damage on the boat or is the customer just trying to make it cosmetically acceptable? sixth, your saying teak, is the whole interior teak or just that area? Have you ever padded/tampon-ed/rubber-ed/ anything else but shellac? just so you know, you can pad varnish also.

If it is teak, you are dealing with a oily waxy wood. this will have to be neutralized with a 5% solution of phosphoric acid and then immediately wiped with methanol [wood alcohol] But firstly i would repair the damages and then feather out the entire area so that everything will blend in as good as possible. you may even have to use dyes sparingly to match up any loss of oxidation to the wood. get back and will go from here.

Oh, and yes i have 40 years of yacht work behind me and 45 of restoration and conservation of historical and museum quality object's. I am/was a conservator up to 3 years ago when i retired. In-fact the only reason I'm here is because of a friend of mine looking for boat answers also. Carlos bartolini, :boat: You can see his boat pics and progress on his post Mahogany boat finish. just a few post below yours.

Sincerely,

Chemmy/SAM
 
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