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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm using my new framing nailer for the first time, and I'm having some issues getting it to fire. It cycles and impacts (leaving a dent in the wood piece), but doesn't sink a nail (usually - it works maybe 10% of the time).

This is a NuMax SFR2190, and I'm working at ~110-115 psi (range is 70-115).
I tried two different banks of nails (2 and 3.5in) with the same result.
My brad nailer works fine off the compressor. The compressor seems to have a little trouble keeping up with the framer, but it stays at pressure for at least a few shots before it has to cycle back on.
I cleared a couple jams, but mostly the magazine was fine.
Disconnecting it from the air, I found that sometimes (but not all the time), the safety latch wouldn't push in all the way.

One potential problem is that we have 22 degree nails, and it's a 21 degree spec nailer. Is that enough to cause frequent misfiring? I see a lot of articles saying that a degree or two doesn't really make a difference.

Thanks for any advice.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0032JTDPO
 

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I think I can help you if I can get a little more information.
I am familiar with the Max brand of nailer, but not a NuMax.
Are you sure it's NuMax or could it be a new Max?
Next, how are your nails collated? Paper tape, hard plastic or wire-weld?
If you bought the tool new, you should have the operating manual. The OM should state exactly which brands of nails will work in your tool. Not all nails work in all nailers.
Give me a few answers and let's get you nailing.
 

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The wrong degree nails are the issue. I've heard the same wives tales about some folks getting them to work but it's just that, a tale.

If you look at the 'magazines' on framing nailers it's obvious the varying angles of the designs. It's makes complete sense that you would need to use the appropriate designated nail clips for the particular nailer. Also, generally your nailer in the 20* range uses different types of clip designs as well as being centered full head nails. Nailers in the 30* range use yet a different design and run offset nails, whether clipped or full headed.


Try the correct nails and report back.
 

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I used to have that problem with my old Paslode framing nailer. In my case the problem was the size of the air line. Even though I had sufficient pressure I did not have sufficient volume. I increased from a 1/4" line to a 3/8" line and it worked great, can't remember it miss firing after that. Try that and see if that is the problem, if not there might be an issue with the gun.

Personally, I don't think it is the nails for just the 1 degree. My current nailer is a cheap Porter Cable model and it works fine with a 2 degree difference in the nails, as long as they are the required clipped head.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks for all the advice. Some updates:
  • I went out and got 21 degree nails - it works a little better, maybe, I think? Still not even 50% success though (photo below).
  • It's definitely a NuMax, same as in this link.
  • The nails are hard plastic collated, round-head, as indicated by the manual. The manual calls for "Hitachi, DeWalt, Porter Cable, Duo-Fast, Senco, & Generic Brand Plastic Collated 21deg Full Head Framing Nails."
  • Interesting point on the air line size - but wouldn't that be limited by the tool inlet (1/4 NPT) anyways?
  • I've been oiling the tool before each use.

Thanks again all.

 

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Thanks for all the advice. Some updates:
  • I went out and got 21 degree nails - it works a little better, maybe, I think? Still not even 50% success though (photo below).
  • It's definitely a NuMax, same as in this link.
  • The nails are hard plastic collated, round-head, as indicated by the manual. The manual calls for "Hitachi, DeWalt, Porter Cable, Duo-Fast, Senco, & Generic Brand Plastic Collated 21deg Full Head Framing Nails."
  • Interesting point on the air line size - but wouldn't that be limited by the tool inlet (1/4 NPT) anyways?

Thanks again all.


Tessie,
Thanks for the added information.
There are two different things going on with your air supply.
1. The PSI needs to be at 100 lbs or more for this tool.
Most small compressors will pump up to 110 or more and turn off, but then they allow the pressure to drop to 80-85 lbs before they come on again. Your tool might shoot two nails fine. Burying the first nail, leaving the 2nd nail flush, the 3rd nail standing and then blank firing (no nails).
2. The CFM needs to be high enough to recover from the first and 2nd shots. If you have a small tank or no tank, you have very little CFM.
Changing your hose from 1/4" to 3/8" will actually add CFM to your system because the added dimension of the hose adds more air storage. But I don't think an air hose change will totally fix your problem.

Small compressors can handle finish nailers and smaller staplers just fine but they can't always carry the load for a framing nailer.
I suggest you try your tool on a larger compressor. I bet it will work just fine. I think the problem is with your compressor. I think it's too small for the framing nailer. This is a common problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for your reply Toolman.
That was my suspicion as well, although that's not the pattern I'm seeing. On a fully charged compressor, the first shot might shoot a blank, but maybe the third will work. It seems to be random, and when it does shoot a nail, it goes fully in. The pressure definitely does droop, but I've got the tool up to 115 psi for the first shot, and over 100 for at least a few.
Compressor is this one, 3 gallon tank 2.0 SCFM @ 90 PSI 135 Max PSI.
That said, I'll try it with a bigger compressor later this week and see if that helps.
Thanks again!
 

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By checking it out with a larger compressor, it will at least help identify the problem. If the tool works fine, you know it's your compressor.
If the tool still malfunctions, you will know it's the tool itself and it should be returned or repaired.
Never use more pressure than 120. And Never hook a tool up to an oxygen bottle.
Good luck to you.
 

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Two common problems causing misfire in framing guns are the driver not fully retracting or the strip follower not having enough force to push the nails up.
 
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