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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I've got another "opinion" question. So, I'm building a table top in order to utilize a substantial collection of oak cut-offs. I put them together in an appealing way, glued and nailed brace boards underneath, and trimmed it up. I want to put a frame of 3x3 oak around the whole thing(to break up the monotony of the lateral construction), and my question is this: if it were you, would you miter and lock the corners of the frame, or would you leave them square and dowel them together. It's not a structural decision, so it really is an opinion. I like the clean look of a lock-mitered corner, but I also like the accent potential of a nice dowel pattern. I suppose I could do both, but I feel like it may look a little silly, having the dowels and the miter key. I don't know. It's not super important, and it's just a scrap table anyhow, but I always like to hear what you all have to say. I'm probably going to have some finish questions on this item, too, but I'll place it appropriately. Thanks!

WCT
 

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Hey guys. I've got another "opinion" question. So, I'm building a table top in order to utilize a substantial collection of oak cut-offs. I put them together in an appealing way, glued and nailed brace boards underneath, and trimmed it up.
Could you post a picture or a sketch of the orientation of the wood pieces. Your "gluing and nailing brace boards underneath" may restrict crossgrain movement.






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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll post a picture soon. Right now, it's all covered up(surprise company). The "slats" are oriented such that the grain is running across the width of the table. I think the nails may be too restrictive as well, so I'm thinking screws with slotted holes for the support structure. I did leave gaps in between the individual slats for expansion(Louisville is in a river valley, and the summer humidity can be comparable to the Everglades at times), as the wood is very old and very dry. I initially wanted to use pour-over epoxy to finish the table, but thought that it may restrict cross grain expansion come spring. I don't know a whole lot about epoxy, so that could be way off. The slats are, on average, about 1.5 inches square by two feet long. They're all very dry red oak. I left about 1/32 of an inch on either side of each one for movement, and I used thin, rough pine for the supports, so any movement should force it to crack before the top. Worst case scenario, the thing expands incredibly and destroys itself. It was all scrap wood, and is just going to be an extra table for "whatzit" storage anyhow. I'm treating it as an experiment, to try different things, so if it works out, it's a bonus. I really appreciate having people like you to key me in to things I may have overlooked, forgotten, not known about or handled incorrectly. Makes the whole process much more pleasant.

WCT
 
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