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Just figuring it out
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Discussion Starter #1
If you were building a frame into which a mirror with a 1-1/2" bevel was going, would you cut the rabbet with the angle of the bevel, or just square as usual?

I don't have the mirror yet, so it could be difficult to actually find the bevel angle. I could so some math though and make a better guess than "zero".
 

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Dave - 1-1/2" bevel is pretty big; what size will the mirror be ?
how will it be used when the project is done ? (wall hanger or in a piece of furniture).
I will be building my grandson a "valet" and making the mirror myself and it will have
a 3/4 - 1" bevel and the rabbet will be standard, like for a piece of plywood.
leave plenty of room for movement. if the glass is loose, I will be using mirror mastic
to hold it in place with small shims.
others may have a different approach, but that is my intentions.
 
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The Nut in the Cellar
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I made a mirror twenty years ago with a beveled glass. The bevel is 1" wide and was the bevel chosen by the glass shop I had make the mirror. The mirror sits in a 1/4" by 3/4" dado that holds the mirror, 1/4" back cover board, and 1/4" thick retaining strips. I shimmed the space between the mirror and the back cover with sheets of acid free sheets of paper so the mirror was held securely.
 

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Just figuring it out
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
It'll be a full-length mirror, the glass around 5ft x 18in, and the bevel will match other mirrors in the bath. It's just a frame hanging on the wall, though I may do some sort of cleat for support.

Thanks for the idea about Mirror Mastic, I had to look that up. If you were making a frame this size, how much space would you leave for movement? I would be not happy if the mirror cracked because the frame shrunk!

Thanks
Dave
 

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Just figuring it out
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
That's real nice Jim - you've been at this hobby a while! Thanks for the tips.
Dave
 

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Dave - I doubt very seriously that wood shrinkage would crack the glass.
but, it could make your joints open up. (which is pretty aggravating).
being in the bathroom - you need to take into consideration of the possible
extreme moisture levels and build accordingly. how thick will the glass be ??
looking forward to seeing your project !!

.
 

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Just figuring it out
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
John, I'm planning on 1/4" glass for the mirror. Jatoba frame with bridle joints with a square ebony peg through the joint front to back.

Is the finish relevant, like an oil finish versus a poly, in terms of the wood being affected more or less by the moisture in the room? Given the hardness of those woods, I'm thinking they shouldn't move much, or is that just wishful thinking? Frankly I hadn't even thought about the dampness in the bathroom until this moment...
 

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Dave - I build very little projects that are stained or clear coated.
I prime and paint. (unless it is boat related; then it is varnished).
many people here build wood projects for the bath - but not many
have come back a year or so later with an update.
maybe someone will chime in with "real" experience and not just a "you might try this".
1/4" glass that size will have some weight to it - plan accordingly for the mounting.

.
 
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The Nut in the Cellar
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The mirror I made was originally for above the vanity in a small bathroom. After many years there, it now hangs on a wall in the foyer of our new home. The mirror frame hangs on a French cleat built into the upper back of the frame. The frame joinery is butterfly keys in the back of the frame and shelf. FWIW, the finish is 1# shellac sealer, water based brown analine dye, Watco Danish oil, and wipe on polyurethane, rubbed out with a white non-woven abrasive pad and wax.
 
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