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Discussion Starter #1
After 3 consecutive unsuccessful glue ups I was beginning to think that cutting a few pieces of wood, slapping some glue on them and clamping them together was just beyond my skill level. I ended up with hairline or even bigger gaps in at least one joint on each one. I found that the problem is with my table saw. After cutting angles the blade isn't returning to 90* (or zero?) even though I crank it till it stops. I'm assuming there is sawdust built up somewhere in the mechanism/arbor that's keeping it from returning all the way. I don't have an electronic angle finder but that would be nice to have right now. As soon as I warm up some more I have to get started with this.....28* in the building where my saw is right now...This should be something I can remedy with a brush and air hose without taking anything apart and therefore changing any other settings right? It's a Sears 10" contractors saw. The bottom is open to access. Thanks
 

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puffessional Scrabbleist
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clamps

A sign in my shop states a woodworker is only as good as his or her clamps. It's one of the only real universal laws about WW'ing. I clamp everything but never try to force a joint unless planned.

An electronic meter isn't needed (but so nice). I just bought one. But, all you have to do is grab a small plastic triangle and keep it atop the fence of your saw(if possible). If you do it right you will see daylight if off either way. A bigger square or triangle should be used if it's off but to rough it at the start a small one works fine.

There are few things WW'er's do that cannot be done several ways. Find the method you like and trust. Good luck. I'd advise keeping the mind-set that there are many things you don't know...yet. If you take things one step at a time this is the most satisfying hobby around. Many don't even mess with measuring but just blow the saw out really well before changing tasks.

TonyM
 

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Sawdust Creator
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It could be just saw dust built up, but it could also be the stops need adjusting.

I'd go the plastic drafting triangle route....the electronic gauge is nice, but most only have an accuracy of .1 degree...probably enough for most uses, but it would be nice to know you were dead on for the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Tony I use plenty enough clamping power to bring the pieces together, if anything, I may be over clamping and squeezing too much glue out.
ryan Yes, good point, won't know for sure until I get to take a close look at it.

I'm not sure it will get done today but my plan is first a clean up of everything inside the housing which never hurts any machine. Then, take a look at the stop and see if it's out of adjustment. I've got my squares ready to go and I even did a RTFM just to make sure I was on the right track with where the adjustment is. It's cold today 15* and going to stay cold for a few more days but I will do as much as I can and then come inside to get warmed up and then do some more. I'll try to get before and after pictures. Thanks guys for your thought.
 

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newer 113 series c-man TSs have stop screws set into the table top on either side of the insert. there are flat spots on the trunion that meet the set screws and stop the movement of the trunion. my ridgid TS (built by emerson electric for ridgid) is the same as a newer c-man 113. sawdust can accumulate on those flat spots and prevent the trunion from returning to 90°. older c-man 113s have stop collars on the bevel adjustment rod within the cabinet.

i back the set screws in the table top all the way out so they do not contact the trunion and use a drafting square or a digital angle cube to set angles. always accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
FrankC Good stuff and I will try that tomorrow. Thanks

toolguy1000 The manual I have is for a 315.228310 but when I went out to do how it said to adjust the stops, it wasn't like that. I did however notice two holes on either side of the insert toward the front of the saw. I didn't blow the sawdust out of these because I didn't know that they might be the set screws you speak of. I'll start in again tomorrow and get the number off the saw plate and make sure I have the correct manual. Thank You for the information.
 
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