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Discussion Starter #1
I have my dad's Planer which is designed for a 220 outlet, which I can not make happen, not having any more room in my small 60amp house panel. Is there any chance I could change the motor or something and make it work on 110?
Otherwise, would selling it make me enough to buy a benchtop 110v planer for my small hobby shop?
 

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What is the brand, model, condition etc of the planer? I haven't done it, but some tools are made for simple conversion between 220v and 110v. If yours wasn't made to be convertible it might be easier to put in a 110v motor.
 

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You can free up a 220 circuit if you install a couple of tandem circuit breakers on 2 110 legs. You will have to see if your panel will accept the breakers before buying them.

What this does is allow you to double up for 110 in the same space as the regular 110 single pole breaker. The tandem breaker is the same size as a regular 110 breaker but it will accept two separate runs. By installing two of these, it will free up a space for a double pole 220 breaker. If you aren't familiar with electricity you probably should have someone that is do this.

I had one those molder/planers but don't remember if it can be changed to a 110. It will cost you more running it on a 110 than a 220 as that machine does draw some pretty good amps.
 

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Unless you're keeping it for sentimental reasons or really need the molder capabilities of this planer then I would get a lunchbox planer that runs on 120v. I had the DeWalt 733 for about 20 years and when the motor finally quit I upgraded to the 735 and that's an impressive planer. There's also the 734 and that is a good planer, as well.

David
 

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I have my dad's Planer which is designed for a 220 outlet, which I can not make happen, not having any more room in my small 60amp house panel. Is there any chance I could change the motor or something and make it work on 110?
Otherwise, would selling it make me enough to buy a benchtop 110v planer for my small hobby shop?
There should be a plate on the motor that says what voltage it can be wired to. It may be marked 110/220 where it list voltage. If it does say that it can be wired to 110v. Let us know the make and model of the motor. It may not be the original motor and each company has a different schematic on how to make the change.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I have that same planer, but mine's a Craftsman badged model made by Foley Belsaw. It has a 12.5" or 13" width capacity and I run a 3 HP 240 volt motor on it. It is a real workhorse and will plane up to 7" or 8" thick stock. I would do alI could to keep it it, even though I do have two other planers, a 13" Ryobi "lunch box" and a 15" Jet 3 HP. As Big Jim suggested you can replace a single 120 v breaker with a "doubler" and I have done exactly that. That will open up only one slot on the main panel, but you need two open slots. An Electrican will be able to do this wiring at about 1 hour's labor.
The advantage to this older planer are the rubber drive rollers which in good condition will drive better with less down pressure than stell ribbed ones, at least that's my experience with it. It's my "go to" thickness planer even though it sounds like a freight train when it's running with all the chain drives whirring around, I still use it. It has straight blades which I have learned how to remove and sharpen. A newer planer will cost agreat deal more than you can get for this, in my opinion, so it's worth putting a little money in electrical wiring and other odd parts.
A photo of the motor name plate would be helpful in determining the horse power and amperage requirements.
Chances are if it is presently wired for 240 volts, it has a 3 HP motor and that will not run on 120 Volts, so you are stuck running it on 240 volts.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What is the brand, model, condition etc of the planer? I haven't done it, but some tools are made for simple conversion between 220v and 110v. If yours wasn't made to be convertible it might be easier to put in a 110v motor.
It's a Foley-Belsaw 984, hasn't been used for over 25years, for the last 8 it was in outbuilding storage. I know it needs complete restoration, so a good time to replace the motor. How many hp does it need?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You can free up a 220 circuit if you install a couple of tandem circuit breakers on 2 110 legs. You will have to see if your panel will accept the breakers before buying them.

What this does is allow you to double up for 110 in the same space as the regular 110 single pole breaker. The tandem breaker is the same size as a regular 110 breaker but it will accept two separate runs. By installing two of these, it will free up a space for a double pole 220 breaker. If you aren't familiar with electricity you probably should have someone that is do this.

I had one those molder/planers but don't remember if it can be changed to a 110. It will cost you more running it on a 110 than a 220 as that machine does draw some pretty good amps.
I'm pretty sure I don't have any room on the panel at all. I went through electrical issues early on the renovation here. I had an electrician come in and he wouldn't touch the meter, so now I can't do anything new until the trailer park replaces them, which they are probably not in any hurry to do.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I'm pretty sure I don't have any room on the panel at all. I went through electrical issues early on the renovation here. I had an electrician come in and he wouldn't touch the meter, so now I can't do anything new until the trailer park replaces them, which they are probably not in any hurry to do.
The suggestion from Big Jim and myself will make room on the panel. No need to touch the meter at all. It all depends on the type of breaker panels you have and whether they make a "doubler single pole" breaker. Mine is a Square D type "O" and that's what I used to double up two 120 volt circuits in a single panel slot/opening.
Here what several of them look like along the bottom with two single ones on the left side above:
20210227_172020.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter #10
..." A newer planer will cost a great deal more than you can get for this, in my opinion, so it's worth putting a little money in electrical wiring and other odd parts.
A photo of the motor nameplate would be helpful in determining the horsepower and amperage requirements.
Chances are if it is presently wired for 240 volts, it has a 3 HP motor and that will not run on 120 Volts, so you are stuck running it on 240 volts.
As I responded before, I can't increase any of my electrical until the landlord replaces my meter, but if that happens, I'll be on it like white on rice! As it is, I can barely run one power tool and my small shop vac, or a fan or the lights at the same time.
The planer at my brother's house now (half an hour away), he was going to have it restored just before the pandemic, it's still sitting there, so I don't have access right now to the nameplate, but I'll check it out when I can get up there. How can I know if I can use a smaller motor on it, one that can run on 110v?
 

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Do you have a 220v electric dryer? If so you might draw power from there. You just couldn't run the machine and the dryer at the same time. Might give you a temporary solution until it can properly be wired.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The suggestion from Big Jim and myself will make room on the panel. No need to touch the meter at all. It all depends on the type of breaker panels you have and whether they make a "doubler single pole" breaker. Mine is a Square D type "O" and that's what I used to double up two 120 volt circuits in a single panel slot/opening.
Here what several of them look like along the bottom with two single ones on the left side above:
View attachment 424731
424732
424733
Here is my panel and the legend for it. The top two areas that look empty are useless due to the spacing of the main. The dryer is about twenty feet from the workshop outside. The water heater is 5 ft closer but is hardwired.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Do you have a 220v electric dryer? If so you might draw power from there. You just couldn't run the machine and the dryer at the same time. Might give you a temporary solution until it can properly be wired.
The dryer is 20 ft away from the workshop and the plug is behind it and hard to get at.
 

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where's my table saw?
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As I responded before, I can't increase any of my electrical until the landlord replaces my meter, but if that happens, I'll be on it like white on rice! As it is, I can barely run one power tool and my small shop vac, or a fan or the lights at the same time.
The planer at my brother's house now (half an hour away), he was going to have it restored just before the pandemic, it's still sitting there, so I don't have access right now to the nameplate, but I'll check it out when I can get up there. How can I know if I can use a smaller motor on it, one that can run on 110v?
Motors have common bolt pattern mounting frames, like FEMA frame 56 being the most common. It has slots for the mounting bolts so it will work on many types of machines.
The smallest motor that work well on that planer and will run on 120 v is 1.5 HP, and that will draw 18 AMPS and need it's own circuit. A 1 HP motor will draw 12 AMPs and would "work" on a circuit with other devices, but you just can't run them while using the planer. The 60 AMP panel is the absolute minimum size there is to run a house or a shop. Upgrading the electrical would be your best bet, safest and most efficient. Running extension cords to power heavy duty motors is not efficient and may in some cases be unsafe. OK, I'm a good example of having too much electrical power. I have 400 AMPs running to the meter, then running to a 225 AMP main panel for the house and a 150 AMP main panel on the shop. I have 100 AMP sub panels off the mains as well which gives me more breakers. My house was originally designed to be heated by electric, but that proved way too costly, although I use 240 Volt heaters in the wood shop, the metal shop and the garage. I keep them just below 50 F all winter but that is still expensive.

I will tell you that even though your main panel has a 60 AMP "main" breaker, which should "trip" if the load on it totals 60 AMPs or greater, you may have other additional circuit breakers that when totaled up exceed the 60 AMPs. The reason you can do this is simply that not all of the devices come on or run at the same time. If they did, or any combination thereof that exceeds 60 AMPs, it would trip the 60 AMP breaker.
 

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I can't make out the brand of the breaker box. Some of them sell a thin breaker that will put two breakers in the slot where you have a single now. Then you may be able to have someone move the load on some of them to give you space for a 220V breaker. Circuit Breaker, Amps 20 A, Circuit Breaker Type Tandem, Number of Poles 1 You would just need a electrician to insure you don't overload the panel.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I can't make out the brand of the breaker box. Some of them sell a thin breaker that will put two breakers in the slot where you have a single now. Then you may be able to have someone move the load on some of them to give you space for a 220V breaker. Circuit Breaker, Amps 20 A, Circuit Breaker Type Tandem, Number of Poles 1 You would just need an electrician to ensure you don't overload the panel.
Thanks for that info. The electrician that came to look said he won't add anything to this panel. If I could get the landlord to replace the meter, he would put in a 100 amp box for $200. So I guess I just have to wait
 

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There are at least three brands of breakers in that panel: Bryant is the 60 amp main, Cutler-Hammer, and Eaton. It looks like the Bryant (main) is a type “BAR”. The other two are type “BR”. There is a type “MP-T” breaker labeled as the water heater. The Bryant dryer breaker is type BR. The labels on the other breakers are covered.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
There are at least three brands of breakers in that panel: Bryant is the 60 amp main, Cutler-Hammer, and Eaton. It looks like the Bryant (main) is a type “BAR”. The other two are type “BR”. There is a type “MP-T” breaker labeled as the water heater. The Bryant dryer breaker is type BR. The labels on the other breakers are covered.
I'll look at them in the morning and see if I can find the other names.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Unless you're keeping it for sentimental reasons or really need the molder capabilities of this planer then I would get a lunchbox planer that runs on 120v. I had the DeWalt 733 for about 20 years and when the motor finally quit I upgraded to the 735 and that's an impressive planer. There's also the 734 and that is a good planer, as well.

David
A little bit sentimental, but the biggest reason is the price of new ones. If I can make this one work it will be worth keeping. To buy a replacement, I'd have to get something really cheap or do without. I do have a hand plane or two. :cautious:
 
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