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Hi All!


I'm new and very much a beginning hobbyist. My father is the woodworker, and he and I are looking to build some floating shelves in my kitchen utilizing the following method:


http://houseupdated.com/diy-heavy-duty-bracket-free-floating-kitchen-shelves/


Essentially, for the tldr, driving 5/8" threaded rods into studs and mounting 2x12s onto the rods. In the blog she just does a couple. The plans for my kitchen are a bit more aggressive. There would be three to four levels per stud and it would wrap around the wall of the kitchen. I can get into more detail if necessary. We had planned on using brackets before finding this tutorial. I hope this is the right place to ask questions about a project like this. It seems like the site may be geared towards more refined woodworking, so I appreciate any input you may have. That being said my query is:


My father is concerned about removing that much material from each stud, whether that would ill-effect the structural integrity of the studs too much, and he asked me to ask around. Not knowing any professional wood workers personally, I figured a forum would be a great place to start. Again I appreciate any input!


Cheers,
Chad
 

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I would recommend getting some kind of drill guide like this to drill the holes. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Wolfcra...gclsrc=aw.ds&dclid=CPecqMmfi94CFVW_TwodbiIPSQ The holes need to be straight and level, not like the link where some of them are angled down. A doweling jig would also help getting the holes in the shelf straight too. Everything needs to be very accurate and the more rods you use the more accurate it will need to be or you will have a knife fight trying to get the shelves over the rods.

I wouldn't worry about weakening the wall. Electricians and plumbers drill multiple holes in framing every day and you don't see houses falling down because of it.
 

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Floating shelves ... not for the timid

As experienced as I am in remodeling, construction and woodworking I would be somewhat intimidated making floating shelves. As stated in the article, the location and angle of the holes is crucial. I would probably make a drill template the length of the shelves after drilling into the studs. The template would have identically located holes as the wall. It could be made of 1/8" hardboard or Masonite. I would test it by inserting short dowels in the holes and make certain it slides easily onto them. Each shelf would have it's own template.

Getting the holes at 90 degrees in 2 axis is a different issue than getting their exact location. Once the holes are properly drilled, the next issue is duplicating them exactly in the edge of the shelves, no easy task without a drill press. I have no solutions at this point and would have to seriously think about it to offer any suggestions. :|
 

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I share your fathers concern about the integrity of the rods in the stud. It would be important to get the rod right in the middle. If it was me I’d hammer some little nails in to make sure I knew where the edges of the studs were. Nothing magic about 5/8” rod, you may be able to go with 1/2” or less. It’s more of a stiffness issue than strength, I would imagine. You could put a pencil to it. Instead of true floating shelves you could drill all the way thru, use longer rods threaded on the end and draw them against the wall with a nut. That way they wouldn’t deflect as much but more work. Ain’t it great.
 

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In my last office I used Ikea floating shelves to display my steam engines, I cut away the sheet rock and fastened their brackets directly to the studs, then plastered over the bracket before putting the shelf on, I was worried about the sheet rock crumbling and the shelf tilting. The shelf is fastened to the peg with a screw so it won't slide off, I had to redrill that.

For what it is worth I have never been a big fan of open shelves in a kitchen, with all the steam from cooking and dishwashing things tend to get rather grungy sitting there for a while.
 

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Just use long screws ...?

There are long screws made for joining wood joists to the rafter plates that do not require pre-drilling. Done in this manner, there's no need to align 2 holes and slide the shelf over a rod. You would just drill a pilot from the front right on the stud centerline stopping after piercing the drywall. Then drive the screw into the stud with the special bit. A counterbore could hide the head of the screw if desired. They come in lengths up to 10":
https://www.amazon.com/FastenMaster-FMTLOK10-12-TimberLOK-Heavy-Duty-12-Count/dp/B001E4VPDW
 

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I cant place why, but something in my gut doesnt like the look of those. I dont think thered be a material issue, it just a weird something thats sticking in my head. A hole that size in the narrow side of a stud would be taking out about 1/3" of the material, you could probably do 1 shelf like that but multiple i feel would take away way too much of the stud. Not too sold on the method of anchoring the threaded rod, screwing into wood like that usually holds, but i dont think id trust it.

Floating shelves in general im not huge on, TBH. Something about them just seems like theyre built to fail. No big reason for it, not that i can articulate anyway, but i try to stay away, especially for functional stuff
 

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Given the level of difficulty getting the rods and holes in the shelf accurate enough, a simpler method would be to take the rock off the walls and put some 2x4 blocking between the studs to support and fasten the shelf to. Make the shelf insert all the way through to the back side of the wall. Then once the shelf is installed re-install the sheetrock.
 

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I like the idea of cutting away the sheetrock to expose the studs. If you carefully cut away a thin strip of the sheetrock, you can expose the studs and do whatever you need there. When done, the shelf should hide the cut away portion, or you can re-plaster it first.
 

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Look at related items below ...

Floating shelf hardware might be an answer that resolves all of the issues. Cheap enough on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Floating-Bra...ocphy=9004237&hvtargid=pla-394409792358&psc=1
There are some other good ideas listed below this description. This one seems to make more sense with narrow hole spacing for attaching to the studs. I would be reluctant to drill "mating" holes escpecially into the studs on the narrow edge:
https://www.amazon.com/Solid-Steel-...=B075DTP8RC&psc=1&refRID=ANMX1TF6ZHE9DN3Y78ZR
 

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Looks like those Amazon brackets would require backing behind the rock. Holes are too far apart for a stud. Toggles?
In commercial work we use concealed standards that just show a narrow slot on the face. (Would require drywall work.) Then standard brackets that fit the slot. Shelves are made hollow where needed and simply slide over the brackets. It allows shelves to be set in different locations as the need arises. A way to avoid the drywall work would be to overlay it with some sort of sheet material (veneered panels?) after the standards are installed on the stud locations.
For shallow, lightly loaded shelves you can just screw a piece of 1.5 x 1.5 wood to the wall and make shelves that snuggly fit over it. Put a couple of screws in to hold shelf in place.
For what its worth , I'm not a fan of open shelves in a kitchen either.
 

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I'm pretty sure that the Amazon sourced floating brackets intend that the plate be held vertically and the two screws to be one above the other and not sideways. It would be much stronger if it were placed one above the other.

I mounted some floating shelves using steel rod. I pre-drilled the holes in the shelf and used dowel markers to locate the holes to drill in the wall. See link below.

https://ae01.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1r_XW...rker-Align-Transfer-Plugs-6-8.jpg_640x640.jpg

If you are worried about sagging then buy some 3/8" diameter drill rod (water hardening) from Grainger. About $7.00 for a 36" length. Cut to size. Heat to cherry red and quench. That will make the rod so hard that it will be brittle. So you then heat it to a lighter color and allow it to cool. That tempering will result in spring temper. Even if it bends it will return to its original shape once the stress is removed.

You don't need to heat treat the entire rod. You only need to heat treat about 4" (2" into the wall and 2" into the shelf). The rest you can leave untreated.

You can find videos on heat treating online.
 
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