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We recently purchased a new house in Plainview, NY. The house has a large den which was carpeted. Since we prefer a wood floor, we shopped around and finally decided on a wood laminate (Gunstock Oak) which we found at Lowes. So we contracted with Lowes for their installer to lay the new floor.
The problem can be seen about. The den floor abuts ceramic tile at the entryway. The curve is about five feet long at a gentle 90 degree curve.
The 1st Lowes contractor refused the job stating that the transition could not be made.
The 2nd contractor (Gemini) said it would be no problem.
Gemini laid the floor which came out beautifully. However, the installers did not have the right flexible transition molding for the curve.
We called Gemini who said the molding was backordered.
About a week later another Gemini installer came and installed an 1 ½ “ Wide x ½” High flexible molding. He was a “fast talker” and bragged about the professional hot glue (put down with a glue gun) that he was using to install the molding. No clumping or taping!
Within a day we noticed that the molding showed signs of coming up. After a week it came off.
We contacted Lowes and Master Card, and are awaiting an answer.
Meanwhile, I searched the Internet form information about flexible transition molding. The best site I found was Flexitions (WWW.flexitions.com). There website shows many transitions just like ours. There instruction sheet indicates that the molding should be installed with “premium urethane construction adhesive” and advise taping with blue painter’s tape until the glue sets.
My Question – Does anyone here have experience with flexible transition molding?
 

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So are you looking to reinstall what came up? Can you take a picture of the area? I've never used the products you are talking about, but have made my own.
 

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cabinetman said:
A good product that solves a problem. You would think installers would be familiar with proper methods recommended for the product. .
Until I sold it in 2000 I owned a flooring company that employed 30 hourly employees and 20 to 40 subcontractors daily. I assure you I would not presume that they would know how to install any new product. I also can't speak for every area but in my area the installers that work for the big box stores typically can't find work elsewhere.
 
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