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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well went to the flea market today and found a guy wig a bunch of planes I talked to him for a min then worked out a deal on the whole lot of them 40 bucks for a Stanley block plane a sargeant no. 4 I think a craftsman no. 5 and a really old Stanley no. 78 rabbet plane bit it is missing the fence I believe. I am really new to hand tools so any tips or if you know anything special bout these planes is appreciate it. Well here's some pics

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
They are in decent shape I would like some tips on how to fix em up or some good links on it. There is a small amount of rust on the sole of the craftsman.
 

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Good Score! All of those should be good user planes.

I didn't attach a link, but look through the Hand Tools section and you'll find some great plane cleaning and tuning threads by Dave Paine and others.

There are also many different threads on sharpening - best advise I can give is pick a method of sharpening that seems like it will work for you and your budget and stick with it.
 

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There are a lot of threads on sharpening and de-rustifying, so I'm not going to comment on those. The 78 is a good plane, but yours is missing the fence and the depth stop. I can't tell from the photos, but you may also be missing the nicker that lets it work easily across the grain.

Without those, especially the fence, that plane is... well, not useless, but a lot harder to use. It will still work fine for cleaning up tenons and things like that, but using it to actually cut rabbets is going to be a challenge. If you want to try anyway, here's my advice:

1) Clean and sharpen it, and make sure the sole is exactly perpendicular to at least one of the sides.

2) Mark the width and depth of the rabbet with a knife, and, especially if you're going cross grain, score it as deeply as you reasonably can.

3) Start cutting with the plane tipped sideways, so one corner is in the score line. Make a few passes that way.

4) Once a good trough is established (2 or 3 passes in pine, a few more in hardwood), start tilting the plane back to level, letting the trough guide the edge.

5) Once the plane is flat, make sure the shoulder you've established is perpendicular to the surface of the wood (you may need clean it up with the plane tipped on its side), plane down to the depth you marked.

I've done this with an old skewed rabbet plane that had no fence, and it worked fine. It takes some practice, though, so start out working on a piece of wood that doesn't matter.
 

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A good find. I would start with the Sargent, since it looks to be in decent condition and is a useful size. The knob and tote look sound, just need to be sanded and refinished.

FYI, this is a thread on cleaning up my Sargent, which looked a lot worse than yours, but now looks almost new.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/latest-rust-bucket-planes-46494/

I would then work on the Craftsman. The blade looks like it has lost some length due to sharpening.

Good luck and post updates as you go.
 

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amckenzie4 said:
There are a lot of threads on sharpening and de-rustifying, so I'm not going to comment on those. The 78 is a good plane, but yours is missing the fence and the depth stop. I can't tell from the photos, but you may also be missing the nicker that lets it work easily across the grain.

Without those, especially the fence, that plane is... well, not useless, but a lot harder to use. It will still work fine for cleaning up tenons and things like that, but using it to actually cut rabbets is going to be a challenge. If you want to try anyway, here's my advice:

1) Clean and sharpen it, and make sure the sole is exactly perpendicular to at least one of the sides.

2) Mark the width and depth of the rabbet with a knife, and, especially if you're going cross grain, score it as deeply as you reasonably can.

3) Start cutting with the plane tipped sideways, so one corner is in the score line. Make a few passes that way.

4) Once a good trough is established (2 or 3 passes in pine, a few more in hardwood), start tilting the plane back to level, letting the trough guide the edge.

5) Once the plane is flat, make sure the shoulder you've established is perpendicular to the surface of the wood (you may need clean it up with the plane tipped on its side), plane down to the depth you marked.

I've done this with an old skewed rabbet plane that had no fence, and it worked fine. It takes some practice, though, so start out working on a piece of wood that doesn't matter.
You can still get replacement parts from Stanley for the 78. It'll cost almost as much as your entire purchase, but you can get the rod, thumb screw, depth stop and screw and nicker at stanleytoolparts.com.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies with the 78 I didn't really know what it was when I got it. I figured I would use it for cleaning up tennons and such since the blade reaches all the way to the edge. I'm not a hand tool exclusivr guy I usually do rabbets with my router anyway. I
cant wait to get started cleaning em up and will definitley post pics of my progress.
 
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